Posts Tagged ‘ Waterfalls ’

Nathanael Greene Homestead – Coventry

Major General Nathanael Greene Homestead
Taft Street, Coventry, RI
Trailhead: 41°41’38.98″N, 71°32’39.51″W
Last Time Hiked: August 23, 2014
 
 
Approximate distance hiked: 1.5 miles
Easy with slight elevation.

 

On this property behind the homestead there is a small network of trails that run along and near the Pawtuxet River from the Washington Secondary Trail to a small peninsula. There is a spot to view the Anthony Trellis Bridge as well as the Clairiant Falls along the river. The falls are a manmade dam that once served a large mill building across the river. To access the trails follow the driveway to the right of the homestead. There is an opening in the stone wall here. Follow the path to the cemetery. There is an opening in the stone wall to the left of the cemetery. This is the access point to the trails. As for the homestead itself, there is a vast amount of history here. Nathanael Greene was second in command to George Washington during the American Revolution. The homestead, built by Nathanael, dates back to 1770. It remained in the Greene family for several generations. Today it is a museum. There is an admission fee for the museum. Call 401-821-8630 for hours. The cemetery on the property is that of the Greene family. Nathanael, however, is not buried here. The site also hosts a reenactment of an American Revolution battle the weekend after Mothers Day each year.

 

I did not find a trail map on-line.

Nathanael Greene Homestead

Nathanael Greene Homestead

Purgatory Chasm – Sutton

Purgatory Chasm State Reservation
Purgatory Road, Sutton, MA
Trailhead: 42° 7’44.97″N, 71°42’53.44″W
Last Time Hiked: July 26, 2014
 
Approximate distance hiked: 3.5 miles
Various difficulties, the chasm is difficult to strenuous, the remainder of the hike is moderate.
 

Indeed one of the most unique natural spots in Southern New England, the centerpiece of this hike is the granite chasm which in spots is up to 70 feet deep. It features countless boulders and some caves. Climbing the walls of the chasm is prohibited except by permit. Many injuries have occurred here and there are several warning signs throughout the chasm. In fact, I would suggest checking the forecast before heading here. A damp or rainy day could make the scaling over the rocks and boulders outright dangerous. Also the chasm itself is generally closed in the winter months. Starting early and one of the first to arrive I started today’s hike by first tackling the chasm. The chasm entrance is well marked and the Chasm Loop Trail is blazed blue. It took a little time to conquer this first part of the hike for a couple of reasons. First, scaling and maneuvering over and around the quarter mile of boulders. Second, this is a great place for a guy with a camera (that would be me) to capture the sun coming over the chasm walls. And lastly, I found myself spending some time watching the endless amounts of chipmunks in the chasm. Near the end of the chasm I turned left and continued to follow the blue blazed Chasm Loop Trail as it winded uphill. From this trail there are some impressive views of the chasm. Be sure to not get to close to the edges. I came across Fat Man’s Misery (which I choose to just view) and the Devils Corncrib before following the trail back to the chasm entrance. From here I went around the pavilion to the beginning of the trail named Charley’s Loop. It is a yellow blazed trail that winds through the southeast section of the reservation. I came across some early morning dog-walkers along this stretch. When I reached the intersection with the signage I followed the Little Purgatory Trail which was blazed green. When I reached the small chasm with the trickling waterfall I followed a trail to the right looking for the loop. After a bit I realized that there were no longer any blazes and the trail didn’t seem to loop back in the proper direction. So I retraced my steps back down the trail until I got to the “road”. Here I turned left then left again onto the orange blazed Forest Road Trail. This old stone and dirt road seemed endlessly uphill before it broke off right into the woods. At the end of the Forest Road Trail I turned left onto the Old Purgatory Trail, still blazed orange, as it wound up and down through the forest. The trail eventually end at Purgatory Road where I turned right and made my way back to the car. I did not expect to get 3.5 miles of hiking here (and I suspect it had to do with getting a little off track on the Little Purgatory), but I must say, this was a rather challenging hike on a warm summer morning. Well worth the challenge though.

Trail Map can be found at: Purgatory Chasm.

In The Chasm

In The Chasm

Chipmunk

Chipmunk

Forge Pond – Westport

Forge Pond Conservation Area
Forge Road, Westport, MA
Trailhead: 41°37’53.43″N, 71° 3’14.15″W
Last Time Hiked: July 19, 2014
 
Approximate distance hiked: 0.7 miles
Easy with some elevation.
 

Upon our arrival at Forge Pond we were immediately drawn to the dam and waterfall near the parking area. After taking a look at it we ventured into the woods following the yellow blazed trail that runs near the edge of the pond. The trail offered a few areas that came to the shore of the pond. There is a large boulder “outlook” where the Noquochoke River meets Forge Pond. After taking a few photos we continued following the yellow trail for a bit passing an area with several dragonflies before coming across some ruins. We then made our way to the blue blazed trail which climbs up a hill and loops back to the yellow trail. From here we retraced our steps back to the car.

Trail map can be found at: Forge Pond.

Noquochoke River By The Ruins

Noquochoke River By The Ruins

Tri Pond Park – South Kingstown

Tri-Pond Park
Kingstown Road, South Kingstown, RI
Trailhead: 41°27’22.19″N, 71°30’28.64″W
Last Time Hiked: July 11, 2014
 
Approximate distance hiked: 2.9 miles
Easy with slight elevation, rocky footing in areas.
 

The aptly named Tri Pond Park features a series of nature trails that connects three small ponds in the Wakefield section of South Kingstown. The park is also split by the South County Bike Path. I was joined this afternoon by four friends. One from high school, two on their yearly visit from Malaysia, and their friend from Texas. We set out from a small parking area along Route 108 following a yellow blazed trail that follows the edge of the Rocky Brook Reservoir. We then turned right at the first intersection and over a series of boardwalks. The trail, still blazed yellow, meanders through the thick woods. We did come across poison ivy here and the trail in this area is rocky and root bound. You should use caution along this stretch. There is a small babbling brook that runs along a stretch of this trail. The trail eventually turns left just before Asa Pond. We however went straight to the shore of the pond to take in the sights before returning to the turn along the yellow trail. Continuing along the yellow trail again we passed a stone wall and areas of ferns before reaching the stairs that climb upward to the bike path. At the bike path we turned left and walked for a bit looking for the trail on the right. After finding the trail we followed it back into the woods. We came across a four way intersection that is not shown on the map. We went left as the map suggests that we were to take a sharp left. We then came to the next intersection and turned right onto the blue blazed trail. This trail winds through the woods and eventually comes out to California Jim’s Pond. Along the way we came across an old concrete structure as well as a tree with a primitive tree stand. At the next intersection we turned right towards a bridge that crosses the dam with a small waterfall. After the bridge we turned left onto the white blazed trail and followed that back to the bike path. We then turned left and retraced our steps back to the first intersection near Rocky Brook Reservoir. Here we turned right and followed the trail to its end. We then turned around and made our way back to the parking area. We saw several birds here including a family of geese and a swan. We also saw several squirrels, a chipmunk, and a garter snake, as well as many dragonflies and butterflies. The ponds had several lily pads but we did not see any frogs.

Trail map can be found at: Tri-Pond Park.

Trail At Tri Pond Park

Trail At Tri Pond Park

Asa Pond

Asa Pond

Donigian Park – Providence

Donigian Park Bikeway
Valley Street, Providence, RI
Trailhead: 41°49’23.52″N, 71°26’23.60″W
Last Time Hiked: June 13, 2014
 
 
Approximate distance hiked: 0.7 miles
Easy.

 

I came across Donigian Park while scrolling through the blueways section of exploreri.org webpage. When I looked it up in Google Maps I noticed that there was a bike path shown on the map. On the list it went. Today, a very rainy day, I decided to cancel my planned hike down in Arcadia but I still couldn’t resist getting a short walk in nonetheless. Being in the city I decided to stop here and check it out. The bike path itself is rather short and looks very new. It is in the Onleyville section of the city and runs from Valley Street along the Woonasquatucket River to Sonoma Court. There is a bridge that crosses the river and there is a dam and waterfall here. There are also some paved paths that wrap around the park itself. The park features a ball field and playgrounds. The walk along the bike path out and back and a loop around the park is just about 3/4 of a mile. By the way, I got absolutely drenched.

 

I did not find a trail map online.

The Bike Path Along The River (In The Rain)

The Bike Path Along The River (In The Rain)

Hunts Mills – East Providence

Hunt’s Mills
Hunt’s Mills Road, East Providence, RI
Trailhead: 41°49’41.78″N, 71°20’45.16″W
First Hiked: June 8, 2014 
Previous Hikes: Multiple times with Providence County Hiking Club
Last Time Hiked: August 19, 2014
 
 
Approximate distance hiked: 0.9 miles
Easy.

 

First Visit:

For over 250 years Hunt’s Mills has served many purposes. It is probably one of the more historically significant sites in East Providences’ history. In fact this property is home to the East Providence Historical Society. The historical society is at the John Hunt House which is one of the oldest houses in the city. The house was built in the mid 1700’s. This site also has been home to several mills over time dating back to the mid 1600’s including a sawmill and a grist mill. In the late 1800’s a local private company (Rumford Chemical Works) set up a water company here to supply their mills and factories with water. In the mid 1920’s the town would take over the water company, along with the Turner Reservoir, to supply the growing town with water until the town starting receiving its water from the Scituate Reservoir. At the turn of the century there was an amusement park here to help offset the cost of running the water company. And lastly, the fire department used this property as a training grounds for several years. I started this hike from a small parking area adjacent to the picnic area just before the Hunt House. I then walked toward the “backyard” of the house by going to the right of the house over an earthen bridge. In this area and around the house are some gardens. In the large grass area behind the house there is a circle of granite blocks. These blocks represent where the carousel of the amusement park once stood. Across the field and to the left you will see the actual trailhead. It is a red blazed trail that leads into the woods. Shortly the trail splits. I stayed to the left and the trail led through a gate of a chain link fence. This was the area that was once used by the fire department for training. There are some remnants here including the tower they trained on and an old tanker. The trail continues following the bank of the Ten Mile River. There are a few spots where you can get to the shore of the river. The trail eventually leads to a paved road where I turned right following the road to a cul-de-sac. At the cul-de-sac the trail turns left back into the woods and then left again onto the trail I came in on back to the large grass area behind the house. From here I headed to the gate between the house and large stone building. The large stone building was the pump house for the water company. From here I continued to the fence to see the Hunt’s Mills Dam and waterfall. I then made my way back to the car. This hike would make a nice companion to the Turner Reservoir hike. Also, along this hike I came across many birds and a beaver swimming in the river.

Other Visits:

Every other Tuesday afternoon throughout the summer and into the fall of 2014 the Providence County Hiking Club leads hikes for beginners and history lovers at this location. The route that is followed is the same that was described in the first visit.

 

I did not find a trail map online.

Along The Red Trail

Along The Red Trail

A Secluded Section Of The Ten Mile River

A Secluded Section Of The Ten Mile River

The Falls At Hunts Mills

The Falls At Hunts Mills

Cascade Brook – Smithfield

Ken Weber Conservation Area at Cascade Brook
Mapleville Road, Smithfield, RI
Trailhead: 41°52’47.54″N, 71°34’11.54″W
Last Time Hiked: May 11, 2014
 
 
Approximate distance hiked: 1.0 mile
Fairly easy with some significant elevation and climbing.

 

Cascade Brook made for a nice short and scenic Sunday afternoon stroll. Starting from the dead end of Mapleville Road I made my way into the conservation area following the blue blazed trail. It is a loop trail that is just about a mile long and climbs up and down small hills and ledges. The main feature of this hike is a seasonal waterfall. It is suggested to hike here in the spring when the waterfall is most likely to be active. There are also other trails here. I followed one, short that it was, into a nearby apple orchard. The conservation area is dedicated to Ken Weber who was a Smithfield resident and the author of several hiking books that I have used in research.

 

Trail map can be found at: Cascade Brook.

Seasonal Waterfall

Seasonal Waterfall

Along The Blue Trail

Along The Blue Trail

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