Posts Tagged ‘ Waterfalls ’

Wilbour Woods – Little Compton

Wilbour Woods
Swamp Road, Little Compton, RI
Trailhead: 41°29’15.03″N, 71°10’26.89″W
Last Time Hiked: April 19, 2014
 
 
Approximate distance hiked: 1.3 miles
Easy.

 

Wilbour Woods would be our third short hike of the day. I really had very little knowledge of what we would find here as I did not research it too much. Nonetheless, I found Wilbour Woods very peaceful and serene. We started this hike from a small parking area along the loop road. You can start from any point along the loop road. We then followed the loop road in its entirety counter clockwise. The loop road follows the shore of Dundery Brook as it passes through the property. We came across a trail head along the way and followed it into the woods. It was a short “lollipop” trail. We did come across some evidence of geocaching along this trail. After returning to the loop road we came across a small pond with a rather large stone and small waterfall. We saw some snails here. It seemed we were followed by butterflies that looked surprisingly similar to the ones we saw on our previous hike. We then continued along the loop road passing some signs posted on trees. One was a quote of Roger Williams. After some post hike research, I found that this area was a site of a Native American winter camp. We also came across some stone formations. One was a large slab that look as if it were to be some sort of monument. There are no inscriptions on it. There were some stone tables and benches here as well.

 

I did not find a trail map online.

Dundery Brook Through Wilbour Woods

Dundery Brook Through Wilbour Woods

Small Waterfall

Small Waterfall

Carbuncle Pond – Coventry

Carbuncle Pond – Nicholas Farm State Management Area
Plainfield Pike, Coventry, RI
Trailhead: 41°41’56.91″N, 71°46’19.02″W
Last Time Hiked: April 16, 2014
 
 
Approximate distance hiked: 3.5 miles
Easy with some elevation.

 

Spring in New England… I woke early this morning to the sound of a driving rain and sleet against the window. When I left the house the roads were wet with water. By the time I got to Western Coventry the precipitation had stopped but the roads were covered with a layer of snow. Did I mention it’s mid-April? I arrived at Carbuncle Pond before sunrise and the skies to the west were just clearing. Right place at the right time again, as I found myself watching the nearly full moon setting over the pond before I embarked on my morning hike. Following, for the most part, the hike described in Ken Weber’s “Weekend Walks in Rhode Island” I started this hike from the parking area at the dock and followed the road to the second parking area. From here I followed the edge of the pond to another area that looks like it might be used for parking. At the end of this area (opposite the end of a guardrail) a path opens up to the left. I followed this path to its end as it passed a marsh to the right before climbing up an embankment to an old railroad bed. At the top of the hill I turned right and followed it to an area where there was enough clearance to get a good overlook of the ponds below. I then turned around passing the trail that I came in on and a second trail to the left (I would use after retracing my steps) continuing straight along the old railroad bed until I reached a trestle bridge. This bridge spans the Moosup River and there are plans in the future to connect this area with the Coventry Greenway. At the trestle I turned around and retraced my steps and then turned right at the trail that was marked with blue blazes (this is a segment of the North-South Trail). I then followed the blue blazed trail through areas of pine groves and fields. The skies were now just about completely clearing up and the morning sun was casting long shadows through the trees along this stretch. I could only think of a few more beautiful moments. As the blue trail came out a section of woods I came to an intersection in a clearing. There was a pole with a blue blaze labeled “North South Trail”. Keep this pole in mind for the return part of this hike. At this pole I turned right continuing to follow the blue blazed trail as it descended to Spencer Rock. This is where the Moosup River cascades over a rock formation making for a waterfall. I was here last year, but on the other side, on the much lesser known Perry Farm hike. Today the water was rushing through here much faster than I’ve seen it before mainly due to the amount of rain the area had last night. There were actually flood advisories in the area overnight. After lingering for a bit I continued along the blue blazed trail through thick pines and into another field. At this field there is a very faint trail. In the event it is not visible the trail continues at the opposite end and the left of the field. There is a pole marked with a blue blaze there. The trail continues through more pines and the path narrows quite a bit for a small stretch. As the path descends downhill start looking for a field on the left. The blue blazed trail continues straight to the road. At this field I left the trail and followed the left tree line of the field up to a dirt road. At the dirt road I turned left and followed it to its end. I missed the turn described in the Weber book, however, with a good sense of direction and checking with the GPS I found an alternate route easily. At the end of the dirt road I had noticed the blue blazed North South Trail marker pole I mentioned earlier. If I were to go straight, I would end up back at the railroad bed. If I were to go left, I would end up back at Spencer Rock. So I went right for a few hundred feet before the path split into a three way fork. I followed the path to the right straight down to the road between the first and second parking area. I turned right at the road and followed it to the car. I did not come across much wildlife here other than many birds of all sizes. I did see deer and possibly fox tracks here.

 

Trail map can be found at: Carbuncle Pond.

 

Full Moon Setting Over Carbuncle Pond

Full Moon Setting Over Carbuncle Pond

Marsh At Carbuncle

Marsh At Carbuncle

Spencer Rock

Spencer Rock

April Snow

April Snow

Village Park – Swansea

Village Park
Main Street, Swansea, MA
Trailhead: 41°44’55.86″N, 71°11’25.02″W
Last Time Hiked: March 19, 2014
 
 
Approximate distance hiked: 2.3 miles
Easy with some elevation. Moderate to difficult climbing is optional.
 
 

Village Park was my after work choice for a hike today. This was strictly a last minute decision and I hadn’t done much research on it. I had originally thought of checking out Anawan Rock in Rehoboth but I was more in a hiking mood than a short exploratory excursion. I have known about Abrams Rock (which is in Village Park) for a while but had never got around to checking it out until today. This property is widely known for off road bicyclists. The trails are rather narrow and there are wider fire roads. I did not have a set route in mind when I arrived but I figured I would at least venture out and look for the landmarks that intrigued me. I started this hike from the parking lot behind the Swansea Town Library. I first walked by a cemetery before the fire road veered to the left. I shortly came upon a gate. Just after the gate I turned left and followed the Lakeside Trail as it passed a soccer field before following the shore of a small lake. I took some pictures here in black and white of the clouds and lake. Near the end of this trail there is a dam and waterfall. I then found my way onto the Rusty Car Trail and ironically enough came across an old rusty car. I then followed some fire roads to Wildcat Rock. The rock is one of three rather large and impressive puddingstone boulders in the park. I decided to climb to the top of the rock and see how things (injuries) felt. The sense of accomplishment made the climb well worth it. However, going up was the easy part as I’m still having great difficulty with downhill climbs. After I scaled down the rock I found myself meandering through the Boulderdash Trail and the Two Guys Trail before reaching Abrams Rock. This rock is the largest in the park towering 40 feet above the trail. So I climbed it. After spending some time at the top and taking in the beauty and lonely solitude of Mother Nature I scaled back down and made my way back to the entrance and back to the car. I did discover a few things today. One, I am in much better shape than I was when I climbed the Hemlock Ledges Overlook last spring, and two, I’m still not completely healed from last summers injuries. As with most painful things in life, this will go away someday.

Trail map can be found at: Village Park.

Clouds Over The Lake (4M)

Clouds Over The Lake

Water Falling Over The Dam

Water Falling Over The Dam

Abrams Rock

Abrams Rock

Looking Down From The Top (Note the trail)

Looking Down From The Top (Note the trail)

Arkwright Riverwalk – Coventry

Arkwright Riverwalk
Hill Street, Coventry, RI
Trailhead: 41°43’39.59″N,  71°32’54.40″W
Last Time Hiked: January 18, 2014
 
 
Approximate distance hiked: 1.6 miles
Easy.
 
 

After a very short walk at the Phenix-Harris Riverwalk I made my way to this walk. It is another rail to trails site. The walk starts at a small parking lot on Hill Street and follows small streams. The path in this area is rather root bound. In a bit the path widens and other paths down the hill appear. I continued straight passing a dam until I reached the end near the ruins of an old New England factory. I then retraced my steps for a while before exploring the lower trails closer to the river. I then made my way back to the main trail and back to the car.

I did not find a trail map on-line.

Arkwright Riverwalk

Arkwright Riverwalk

Dam Near Harris Mill

Dam Near Harris Mill

Stillwater – Smithfield

Stillwater Scenic Trail
Capron Road, Smithfield, RI
Trailhead: 41°54’10.91″N,  71°31’20.93″W
Last Time Hiked: January 12, 2014
 
 
Approximate distance hiked: 2.5 miles
Easy.
 
 

The Stillwater Scenic Trail is an old railroad line converted into walking trail in Smithfield. I started this walk at a small parking area at Capron Road. The walking trail is fairly wide and is quite level. It runs along the edge of Capron Pond for a bit before you pass the rapids of the Woonasquatucket River. Just before the small dam is the remnants of an old railroad bridge that crosses the river. Continuing pass the dam the trail follows the shore of Stillwater Pond then goes under Route 116 before ending at Farnum Pike. There is parking available at this end as well. At this point I retraced my steps back to Capron Road. At Capron Road I took a short walk to the bridge to take a few photos of the dam at Capron Pond. This walk seemed to be a haven for birds on a very spring feeling morning.

Trail map and additional information can be found at: Stillwater.

Along the Stillwater Scenic Trail.

Along the Stillwater Scenic Trail.

Capron Pond Dam

Capron Pond Dam

West Warwick River Walk – West Warwick

West Warwick River Walk
Factory Street, West Warwick, RI
Trailhead: 41°42’26.02″N,  71°31’8.97″W
Last Time Hiked: December 21, 2013
 
Approximate distance hiked: 1 mile
Easy.
 

Starting at a parking at the West Warwick Youth Center the river walk follows the Pawtuxet River approximately a half mile to the Royal Mills Dam. There use to be a little more to this walk at one time, however, the flood of March 2010 washed away the footbridge that crossed over the river. (click link and forward to 4:21). The walk is easy and fairly level.

I did not find a map on-line.

Royal Mills Dam

Royal Mills Dam

Map

Map

Ten Mile River North – Pawtucket

Ten Mile River Greenway – North
Daggett Avenue, Pawtucket, RI
Trailhead: 41°53’6.22″N,  71°20’41.71″W
Last Time Hiked: December 8, 2013
 
Approximate distance hiked: 2.3 miles
Easy.
 

I’ve done the Ten Mile River Greenway in three sections, first doing the southern section last winter and incorporating a short middle section with a Slater Park walk this past spring. The entire greenway could easily be done as a whole if you wanted to take a longer walk.  The northern section is wedged between the Darlington neighborhood in Pawtucket and the wooded and wetland areas of the Ten Mile River on the other. This is a rather short walk and it is all paved. I did not come across many animals other than a few swans, geese, and ducks. At Armistice Boulevard there is a small man-made waterfall. There is plenty of parking at the extreme northern end of the greenway.

Trail map can be found at: Ten Mile River North

Ten Mile River Greenway at Armistice Boulevard

Ten Mile River Greenway at Armistice Boulevard

Gainer Dam – Scituate

Gainer Memorial Dam
Scituate Avenue, Scituate, RI
Trailhead: 41°45’26.71″N, 71°34’39.89″W
Last Time Hiked: July 14, 2013

Approximate distance hiked: 1.4 miles
Easy.

I came across this location for a walk in Ken Weber’s second edition of “Walks and Rambles in Rhode Island”. The book was printed in 1993 and described a walk that was nearly 3 miles long. Times have changed since then and it seems that most of the areas described in his book may be off limits now. With that said, the walk I’m going to describe is more of a walk for exercise and a chance to get a great photo of the Scituate Reservoir. Just west of where Routes 116 and 12 meet there is a former intersection on the right. There is a road that is now closed and barricaded but there is just enough room to park a few cars. If you park your car here and walk west to the opposite end of the dam, it is 0.7 miles. To your right before the actual dam is a monument to the person the dam was named for. After the monument and to the right is the reservoir. To the left is the earthen dam and access roads below. The spillway is at the end of the dam on the left. Use caution though, as there is no actual sidewalk and only a narrow grass strip. Cars and trucks do pass rather fast along this stretch.

Scituate Reservoir From The Gainer Dam

Scituate Reservoir From The Gainer Dam

No Trespassing

No Trespassing

Turner Reservoir – East Providence/Seekonk

Turner Reservoir
Pleasant Street, East Providence, RI
Trailhead: 41°49’48.68″N, 71°20’39.48″W
Last Time Hiked: June 2, 2013

Approximate distance hiked: 2.7 miles
Easy.

The Ten Mile River Watershed Council hosted their Trails Day Hike this morning at the Turner Reservoir. They had a good turnout and I met a few new people. We started from the parking area on Pleasant Street in East Providence and made our way along the trail on the west side of the Ten Mile River. This trail leads to an open grass area at the Turner Dam. We then continued, following the shore of the reservoir along a grassy area. To the left is Bridgham Farm which is an East Providence Land Conservation Trust property. Continuing along the shore of the reservoir the grassy area turns back into a trail heading into an area of woods. The trail eventually comes out to Newman Avenue (Route 152). Watch for traffic along the next stretch as it is rather heavily travelled roads. Turning right at Newman Avenue, we crossed the reservoir to the right and Central Pond to the left before heading into Seekonk. We then turned right onto Arcade Avenue following it to where the trail begins again. The trail, blazed blue, is just north of utility pole 1416 on Arcade Avenue. It heads into the woods passing an area with lady slippers in bloom. These lady slippers are wild orchids and are considered endangered. It is illegal to remove these flowers per Massachusetts General Laws. The trail then comes to two intersections. We went straight at the first and right at the second. The trail is still blazed blue and you will soon come to a sign that calls the trail the Warrior Trail named after the Seekonk High School Warriors. The trail continues behind the high school and eventually crosses back into East Providence and comes out to the dam. From this point you get a great view of the reservoir. There is a path that follows the top of the dam back to the waterfall. It then makes its way to the bottom of the dam and heads towards the final leg of this hike. We then made our way through the next section which is a series of boardwalks and crushed stone paths that meander through bogs and along the eastern edge of the Ten Mile River. The trail eventually ends at Pleasant Street. We then turned right, crossed the bridge over the river and made it back to the parking area.

I could not find a trail map online, I did take a picture of the information board showing a map of the trail. It is posted below. I have attached a topographical map of the Turner Reservoir.

The Ten Mile River Watershed Council also has a Facebook page. They will be hosting other walks in the near future.

The Dam At The Turner Reservoir

The Dam At The Turner Reservoir

A Trail Along The Turner Reservoir

A Trail Along The Turner Reservoir

Lady Slippers In Bloom

Lady Slippers In Bloom

Turner Reservoir

Turner Reservoir

Boardwalks Over The Bogs

Boardwalks Over The Bogs

Trail Map

Trail Map

Browning Mill Pond/Roaring Brook – Richmond/Exeter

Browning Mill Pond/Roaring Brook – Arcadia Wildlife Management Area
Arcadia Road, Richmond, RI
Trailhead: 41°33’21.40″N, 71°41’6.94″W
Last Time Hiked: May 31, 2013

Approximate distance hiked: 2.4 miles
Easy.

Six days prior to this hike I was wandering around in the rain at Fisherville Brook and it was 48 degrees. This hike, it was a steamy and humid 92 degree day. An example of New England weather at its finest. I started this hike from the parking area and started heading for the beach area. Nearing the beach area I crossed into Exeter. At present no swimming is allowed. I then followed a gravel pathway which led to an abandoned parks building at the street. I crossed the street and followed a gravel road into the Roaring Brook area of the Arcadia Wildlife Management Area. Just before a gate there is a small parking area to the left. Walking through the parking area I came to a boardwalk the followed the edge of the Roaring Brook Pond. I found several species of birds, fish and frogs here. I then followed the boardwalk to the left. (The trail ahead is part of the North South Trail). I followed it straight, turning back into a trail, until I got back to the street. I then crossed the street and followed the access road ahead of me to the pavillion. Just to the right of the pavillion I found the first yellow blaze of the trail that goes around Browning Mill Pond and followed it to the right. The first half of this trail is fairly narrow leading through some heavily wooded area with some rather large stones. There is a section that is fairly muddy but there are boardwalks built in this part. About halfway around the pond the yellow trail goes to the right following a small brook. It then crosses the brook before coming to an intersection. Turn left at this intersection and follow it back to the pond near the waterfall. I then turned right and followed the trail past an area that was once a fish hatchery. I then continued on the trail crossing back into Richmond near a footbridge, before following the yellow blazed trail back to the car.

Trail map can be found at: Browning Mill Pond

Frog Near Roaring Brook Pond

Frog Near Roaring Brook Pond

The Boardwalk At Roaring Brook

The Boardwalk At Roaring Brook

The Trail Around Browning Mill Pond

The Trail Around Browning Mill Pond

Browning Mill Pond

Browning Mill Pond

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