Archive for May, 2014

Broad Cove – Dighton

** As of October 2015 MOST OF THIS TRAIL IS CURRENTLY CLOSED**

I decided to do some post-work exploratory hikes this afternoon in the Dighton area. I had not found much information on-line on the hikes in this area except for a couple newspaper articles. So off I went in exploration mode. The first hike in the area I attempted was Broad Cove. The trail which starts from a small parking area on Hart Street is the handy work of a Boy Scout Eagle Project. The trail follows an old railroad bed for a mile passing areas of farms and wetlands to the right and residences to the left. The trail is wide in most places switching back and forth from grass to dirt. The trail ends at a small peninsula overlooking Broad Cove. There are a couple benches here if you choose to linger. I then retraced my steps back to the car. I did come across several species of birds here including robins, red winged blackbirds, ducks, and geese.

 

I did not find a trail map on-line.

Along The Broad Cove Nature Trail

Along The Broad Cove Nature Trail

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Carolina South – Richmond

  • Carolina South – Carolina State Management Area
  • Pine Hill Road, Richmond, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°27’58.82″N,  71°41’20.07″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 4, 2014
  • Approximate distance hiked: 4.1 miles
  • Easy.

This was my first venture of at least three planned hikes into the Carolina Management Area. I opted to call this hike Carolina South based on the fact that I partially used the Ken Weber route of that name, although I relied more so on the Great Swamp Press map of the area. I actually plan on doing a hike in the future that will be further south in this management area by Meadow Brook Pond. I was also joined by some friends for this Sunday morning stroll. We started from the parking area by the hunter check station on Pine Hill Road following the wide and flat lane named Andrews Trail. It meanders mostly straight through areas of tall pines and open fields. At the end of this trail we came to a T intersection and turned left. We followed this open lane until it started to turn right then took a narrower path to the left. We followed this narrow path as it followed the edge of large, sweeping, open field. This path eventually came to a section of the North-South Trail (a good description for now, but nature will have its way… starting looking for the blue blazes of the North-South Trail at the large dead tree at the edge of the field). At the North-South Trail we turned left and followed it back into the woods. We did some exploring on a short trail to the right for a moment to take a look at the Pawcatuck River. Continuing on the North-South Trail for a bit we came to an intersection. The blue blazed North-South Trail veered to the left. We followed the trail to the right. We soon passed a trail to the left (we would use this in our return) and continued to a stone bridge. Here the sounds of frogs were very loud. We lingered for a bit before pushing further down the unmarked trail. After a little bit we decided to retrace our steps to the last intersection as the trail we were on was not on the map and out of the management area property. At the intersection we turned right following a trail that eventually rejoined the North-South Trail. We then continued straight onto the North-South Trail passing a cemetery will graves from the mid 1800’s. At the next intersection we turned left onto the Nicoll Trail. (Ken Weber’s route has you continuing straight on the North-South Trail). At the end of the Nicoll Trail we turned right onto the Andrews Trail and retraced our steps back to the car. This area is open to hunting. Be sure to wear orange during hunting season.

Trail Map could be found at: Carolina South.

Open Fields

Open Fields

Harold B. Clark Town Forest – Foxboro

  • Harold B.Clark TownForest
  • Forest Road, Foxboro, MA
  • Trailhead: 42° 3’56.72″N, 71°16’24.21″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 2, 2014
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.2 miles
  • Easy with some slight elevation.

 

The Upper Dam Pond in Foxboro is surrounded by a town forest that has a series of trails cutting through it. Starting from a cul-de-sac at the end of Forest Road we made our way into the forest for our third hike of the day. There are two trails that lead from the cul-de-sac. We took the one to the right that is gated and labeled “Fire Road”. The trail quickly comes to an intersection to the right. We continued straight until we came to a trail to the right that leads to the shore of the pond. After exploring the shores edge for a bit, we continued on the main trail bearing right at the next intersection. This section is part of the Warner Trail (a trail that runs from Cumberland to Canton). We followed this trail crossing a very active spring brook (as we had plenty of rain the last two days) and ignoring a trail that spurred off to the left. Ahead we came to a sign for the Warner Trail. Here we turned right and followed the ridge of an old dam. To the left was a marshy area and to the right was the pond. We came across turtles hear. After crossing the next bridge we followed the trail bearing to the right as it slowly climbed uphill before returning to the entrance trail. Here we turned left to go back to the car. This is area is also used for off road bicycling.

 

I did not find a trail map on-line for this hike.

The Pond

The Pond

Birchwold Farm – Wrentham

  • Birchwold Farm Conservation Area
  • West Street, Wrentham, MA
  • Trailhead: 42° 1’35.12″N, 71°24’20.06″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 2, 2014
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.9 miles
  • Easy with some slight elevation and some rocky footing.

 

After a short hike at Joe’s Rock we decided to cross the street for hike number two of the afternoon. Birchwold Farm is almost directly across the street from Joe’s Rock. Be cautious when crossing the street here. It is heavily traveled and traffic flows quite fast. After crossing the parking area for Birchwold we came to an sign with a trail map and explanations of the trail markers. There are no specifically blazed trails here, however they are marked with colored arrows. The blue/green arrows lead you further away from the parking area whereas the red/orange arrows lead you back to the parking area. From the trailhead we followed a trail slightly downhill into a large meadow. We came across the first of a few informational signs in this stretch. At the meadow we followed the path to the left and followed it along the meadow before it slowly went back into the woods. At the next intersection we went left crossing a bridge over a stream and area of swamp. The swamp marigold was in full bloom here. After crossing the bridge we went right passing some boulders and a small ledge. We continued following this trail straight pass the power to another ledge formation. Shortly after the ledge we took a narrow path to the left up and around the ledge back to the power lines. We continued straight following a path that would soon come to an intersection marked with an orange arrow. We turned left here following a trail that went up and down over some rock formations before returning to the bridge. There was plenty of birds singing in this stretch. From the bridge we retraced our steps back to the trailhead. There are additional trails here. This hike could easily be made a bit longer if you choose to.

 

I did not find a trail map on-line for this hike.

Trail at Birchwold Farm

Trail at Birchwold Farm

 

Joe’s Rock – Wrentham

  • Joe’s Rock Conservation Area
  • West Street, Wrentham, MA
  • Trailhead: 42° 1’36.36″N, 71°24’19.10″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 2, 2014
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.9 miles
  • Moderate due significant elevation, some rocky footing.

 

Again I decided to do a cluster of shorter hikes and today I chose to hike in an area just north of the Rhode Island border. Joined by a fellow hiker today, Joe’s Rock would be the first of three hikes today in the Wrentham/Foxboro area. We started the hike from the parking area following the trail over a small stream to the first intersection. There we turned left following a trail that followed (for the most part) the shore of the pond crossing a small dam and waterfall. The trail leads through an area of pines and a small picnic area before crossing a stone wall onto private property. At the wall we retraced our steps back to the first intersection. We then turned left here and started the climb up the hill. At the next intersection we went left quickly climbing to the top of Joe’s Rock. The view of the pond below and the hills in the distance are well worth the climb. We then continued on the trail following downhill and to the right through a stretch of rocky footing before returning to the last split. From here we retraced our steps back to the parking area coming across a garter snake before leaving.

 

I did not find a trail map on-line for this hike.

View From The Top Of Joe's Rock

View From The Top Of Joe’s Rock

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