Archive for the ‘ ~1 Mile or Less~ ’ Category

Gull Cove – Portsmouth

  • Gull Cove Fishing Area
  • Fall River Expressway, Portsmouth, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°38’4.28″N, 71°13’56.86″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 14, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.0 miles
  • Easy beach walk and trails.

 

Gull Cove is best known as a fishing area along the very busy Route 24. There are a handful of trails here, with a beach walk, make for a walk of a mile. This walk is tide dependent however as most of the trail along the shore can be submerged at higher tides. The trail head is not easy to find as well unless you are looking for it. About halfway down the access road is a widening to park vehicles. A trail follows the north shore of a cove before heading into a small wooded area and up a small hill. There are a small network of trails in this wooded area known as Rye Island. At the eastern edge of the woods the trail comes out near the beach area. A path follows the shore between the woods and the sea grass to a point on Long Neck Goose. At the point retrace your steps. The beach areas also offering an abundance of hermit crabs to view.

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View From The Point At Long Neck Goose.

Island Park Beach – Portsmouth

 

In the Island Park neighborhood of Portsmouth there is a small stretch of strand that overlooks the upper reaches of the Sakonnet River. The beach itself is only about four tenths of a mile long which makes for a nice short walk. The beach is also rather quiet most days visited by locals and neighbors. Looking south you can see Tiverton to the left and Portsmouth to the right. Looking straight out into the distance is Fogland. There are also some restaurants nearby that make this spot a nice and quick get away from the city.

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Sakonnet River From Island Park Beach

 

Point Judith – Narragansett

  • Point Judith – Camp Cronin
  • Ocean Road, Narragansett, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°21’44.47″N, 71°29’8.45″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 22, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Rocky beach walk, otherwise easy.

 

Part of the South Shore Management Area on the western tip of Point Judith, this little spot known as Camp Cronin offers a few different terrains. There is a small walkway, by the Point Judith Fishermen’s Memorial, that leads up to a hill that offers a general view of the surrounding area. Then on each side of the breakwater are small beaches. The one to the east, exposed to the ocean, is very rocky and only suitable for walking during lower tides. The beach to the west, inside the safe harbor, is small and sandy. Exploring a little of each will give you a stroll of up to a half mile. The view of the Point Judith Lighthouse is phenomenal here. You are likely to find photographers, fishermen, and beach-goers here on most days.

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Point Judith Lighthouse

 

Riverfront Park – Attleboro

  • Judith H. Robbins Riverfront Park
  • Riverfront Drive, Attleboro, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°56’30.54″N, 71°17’10.90″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 20, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Easy.

 

Attleboro has just opened a new park along the banks of the Ten Mile River, transforming a bleak industrial strip of land into an appealing spot just outside of downtown. The new park, dedicated to former mayor Judith Robbins, offers a short quarter mile bike path/walking path that is flanked by grass and perennial gardens. There are several picnic tables and sitting benches if you care to linger for a bit for lunch, a break from the day, or waiting for a train as the Attleboro MBTA station is just across the street.

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Riverfront Park

Pierce Beach Park – Somerset

  • Pierce Beach Park
  • Simbrom Drive, Somerset, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°45’57.43″N, 71° 8’3.22″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 10, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.8 miles
  • Easy with some slight elevation.

 

This little park along the shores of the Taunton River offers a little of everything. Here are a baseball field, a basketball court, and  a playground. The park offers just under a mile of walking paths that wind through a patch of woods and open fields. There are a couple sets of stairs that descend down to the beach. This strand can be narrow at high tide so it is best to visit at low tide for the beach walk. At the western edge of the beach is the mouth of The Creek. At low tide look for fiddler crabs scrambling across the beach. Because of its location, you will get a good view of the Taunton River to the south.

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Path to the Beach

North Attleboro Fish Hatchery – North Attleborough

  • North Attleboro National Fish Hatchery
  • Bungay Road, North Attleborough, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°59’34.72″N, 71°17’2.27″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 8, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.0 miles
  • Easy with some slight elevation.

 

The North Attleboro Fish Hatchery, a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service facility, helps restore the native fish populations in New England. Opened in 1950, this facility has produced warm, cool, and cold water fish for re-population. Today, the facility is focusing on American Shad for local rivers such as the Charles and Pawtuxet. The facility has several buildings, a viewing pool, and perennial pollinator gardens. The back end of the property offers a nature trail that is just shy of one mile long and follows the shores of the Bungay River. The loop trail is marked with orange blazed trail markers that guides you along a path that weaves under a canopy of tall pines, beech and maple trees. The trail steadily climbs a hill for a bit before coming to a set of approximately 40 steps downhill. Soon the trail turns right crossing over a bridge over the Bungay River. This trail soon bends to the right and crosses over a dirt access road. Continuing straight the trail comes to a second set of stairs, this time approximately 30 uphill. The trail then continues slightly downhill to another bridge that crosses the river to the main entrance of the nature trail. At both bridges there are noteworthy features. The northern bridge crosses over a small area of rapids and the southern bridge crosses at a small dam and overflow. Along the trail there are a couple spots to view the Bungay River where it widens to a small pond. There are a few spur trails but for this hike follow the main loop trail that is marked. Wildlife is abundant here as frogs, salamanders, and turtles, as well as various birds such as blackbirds, woodpeckers, great blue heron, and mallards have been observed here. There are a handful of informative kiosks along trail. The facility is open Monday through Saturday from 8 AM to 4 PM except for holidays. The gate to the nature trail is locked at 3:45 PM.

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Bungay River

Jones Pond – East Providence

 

Tucked away in a suburban neighborhood is a new walking path in a revitalized park. Jones Pond has a long history for a small park. The pond, originally a freshwater kidney shaped pond, is said to be the location of a Native American village according to an old book by The Narragansett Archaeological Society of Rhode Island. A quarry was also nearby in the early 20th century. During the 1930’s the adjacent Pierce Field Stadium was built and Jones Pond was “squared off” to the shape it is today. During World War II, Quonset huts were built and used on the property. For years after that the pond served as a neighborhood spot to ice skate before falling into disarray. Just recently the pond and surrounding park has been given new life as a half mile of walking paths have been built with perennial gardens along them. There are also some rather interesting, artistic bike racks here. The small shrubs and trees serve as a haven for several species of birds.

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Bike Rack at Jones Pond