Archive for the ‘ ~CRANSTON RI~ ’ Category

Fields Point – Providence/Cranston

  • Fields Point
  • Save The Bay Drive, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°47’10.43″N, 71°22’52.11″W
  • First Time Hiked: June 6, 2013
  • Last Time Hiked: February 10, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.5 miles
  • Easy.

This walk is actually two separate paths on adjacent properties. One is on the Save The Bay property and the other is on Johnson and Wales property at the south end of Fields Point. Both are part of the Urban Coastal Greenway system. Starting from the parking lot at the Save The Bay building I crossed a wooden bridge to the stone path which runs along the extreme northern part of Narragansett Bay (technically the Providence River at this location). At the boathouse I followed the path to the right of the building to the entrance road. Leaving the Save The Bay property there is a stone parking area to the left and the beginning of the second path. I followed this path to the end as it crosses into Cranston and then retraced my steps back to the car. From here there is a newly added section of pathways that lead to the southeasterly tip of Fields Points. A short walk indeed with great views of the upper bay. From this area you can see Sabins Point, Conimicut Point, and Pawtuxet. You can also see the Pomham Rocks lighthouse as well the Conimicut Light all to the south and over the water. To the north you can see the downtown Providence skyline as well as the massive wind turbines at the Port of Providence. If you get a chance, check out the floor in the lobby of the Save The Bay Center. It is a map of the entire bay and surrounding area.

Looking South Towards The Bay

Looking South Towards The Bay

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Pawtuxet River – Cranston/Warwick

This trail is a perfect example of where nature meets modern urbanization. Starting at the parking lot by the locally well known banquet facility Rhodes On The Pawtuxet, I followed the trail along the north side of the river making my way to Warwick Avenue. The trail pretty much follows the shore of the river and is heavily wooded. At the end of the section of the trail you must follow a narrow trail between a fence and the river and make your way to the bridge to cross the river. I stopped to take a look at the river here and noticed a family of geese with four goslings. This is where there is some confusion to where the trail goes next. After crossing the bridge into Warwick, you need to make your way toward the back of the Shaw’s supermarket. From a distance it does not appear to be much of anything, but as you get closer a very narrow trail appears. I followed this trail behind the supermarket (There is another entrance to this trail from the supermarket parking lot if you are not comfortable walking behind the building). The trail has been marked orange and again follows the bank of the river. There is a split ahead with the orange trail going to the right and a green marked trail going to the left following the riverbank. I opted for the green trail. From this trail you can see the Rhodes On The Pawtuxet across the river. Eventually this trail merges again with the orange trail. The trail then comes into a grass clearing near an old manufacturing building before turning back into the final stretch of the wooded trail. The trail ends at Post Road where I turned left and followed it to Pawtuxet Village. As you approach the village you will see some of the oldest houses in the area, some dating back to the 1700’s. In the village, there are few restaurants, ice cream shop, and a pub among other little businesses. The bridge over the river in the village overlooks a series of small waterfalls. After crossing the bridge back into Cranston I made my way to Rhodes Place, turned left, and made my way to the car.

Trail map can be found at: Pawtuxet River

Pawtuxet River

Pawtuxet River

Curran Reservoir – Cranston

  • Curran Reservoir
  • Laten Knight Road, Cranston, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°45’3.62″N, 71°32’26.95″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 13, 2013
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.2 miles
  • Easy, however trails not marked.

 

I had a trail map with me that I had copied from a book that was over twenty years old. The entrance on this map was at  Seven Mile Road.  All was good until about 100 feet into the hike. At the spillway there was suppose to be a bridge. No bridge and no obvious way of crossing. So, the surveyor in me kicked in.  I went back to the car and followed the perimeter of the property until I found another entrance on Laten Knight Rd. The trail-head is at a bend in the road where there is a small area to park.  I had followed this path straight in until I reached an area that was on the map that I had with me.  I was at an intersection.  I continued straight for a bit along a dam to take some pictures of the Upper Reservoir. I then retraced my steps back to the intersection and turned right onto a path in a southerly direction.  This path led me through some areas of pines before coming out to some power lines.  Be very aware of where this path comes out.  Fortunately someone had previously put flagging at this point to retrace the way out.  At the power lines I turned right and followed them for a short bit until I came to a path on the left.  It quickly came to a split. Following the map to the right, I came across a second missing bridge.  I was not able to continue on the path that loops the Lower Reservoir (also known as Spring Lake).  I then returned to the last intersection and took the path I hadn’t used yet. This took me to the shore of the reservoir where I took some pictures.  I could not tell where the path(s) went from there.  I then retraced my steps all the way back to the first intersection near the dam of the Upper Reservoir.  From there I went straight in a northerly direction.  I came across some horseshoe tracks before reaching the edge of the reservoir for yet another photo opportunity. Again I retraced my steps back to the intersection, then turning left and following the path I came in on back to the car. It was well worth looking for another entrance.  This was a nice late afternoon walk on state owned property along the Cranston/Scituate line. I ran into only a few kids on dirt-bikes but other than that it was quiet. The late afternoon sun through the trees made for many great shadows and pictures of the reservoirs.

This area is open to hunting. You should check hunting season schedules before hiking here.

I could not find a trail map on-line, however a D.E.M. map does show the property and some features: Curran Reservoir

Losing Daylight

Losing Daylight

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