Archive for the ‘ ~CUMBERLAND RI~ ’ Category

Mercy Woods – Cumberland

 

The Town of Cumberland recently purchased 229 of the 243 acres of the Sisters of Mercy property for conservation and passive recreation. With the help of the Cumberland Land Trust, the Rhode Island Land Trust Council, and volunteers, Mercy Woods has become not only one of the newest trail systems, but handily one of the most beautiful in Rhode Island. The nearly six miles of trails are well blazed and mapped. For this hike, I led a group, following the Perimeter Walk, from the Sumner Brown Road parking area just off of Route 121. We crossed the road to follow the yellow blazed Mercy Loop. After crossing a field and passing a gate we were onto the trail. The trail winds pass the red blaze trail and turns to the east where it intersects with the blue blazed Ridge Trail. Look towards the right here just before the blue trail. Up on the hill is a pile of rocks, possibly a cairn or an impressive “balance artwork”. Following the blue blazes of the aptly named Ridge Trail for the next two miles leads you up and down some impressive hills, crossing a few streams, passing several stone walls, winding by large boulders and outcrops, along a ridge, and through a forest floor of ferns. The trail intersects with four red blazed trails (Stone Wall, Fisher, Fern, and Fiske) and crosses Sumner Brown Road. For this hike, we followed the blue blazes to their terminus at the Mercy Loop. The Warner Trail also joins the Ridge Trail for a bit. You will see a few white circle blazes along the way marking the long distance trail. When we reached the yellow blazes once again we turned left. Keep an eye out for the blazes as there are two trails to the left (one being not blazed). The remainder of the hike winds through the woods at the southern end of the property, passing through an open field, by power lines, then crosses Highland View Road before the final stretch that leads you back to the parking area.

 

Map can be found at: Mercy Woods.

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Along The Mercy Loop

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Franklin Farm – Cumberland

  • Historic Metcalf Franklin Farm
  • Abbott Run Valley Road, Cumberland, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°57’59.58″N, 71°23’38.37″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 3, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.4 miles
  • Easy with some small hills.

 

In the rolling hills of Northeast Rhode Island is Franklin Farm. The 65 acre town owned property was once a dairy farm now used for community gardening and historic preservation. The farm consists of an old 19th century farm house (currently under restoration) and a turn of the century dairy barn. On each side of Abbott Run Valley Road are large fields with farm trails that are open to the public. The fields are separated from the winding road by century old New England stone walls. Parking is available at the dairy barn. For this walk, first cross the street to get to the East Field. The entrance to the east field is marked with a sign at an opening in the stone wall. Use caution while crossing as there is a significant blind spot for approaching traffic. Once entering the East Field turn to the left and you will see a post with the number 1 on it. The farm trail follows the perimeter of the field and there are 10 numbered posts all the way. From the front of the field looking to the east offers a great wide open view of the sky. Sunrises can be spectacular here. When you are on the backside of the field you can catch glimpses of Rawson Pond down the bottom of the hill. After completing the loop cross back over to the West Field. Going up the driveway and right around the dairy barn back towards the old chain link fence you will find a post with the number 1 on it. The farm trail is again marked by numbered posts that leads you partly along the perimeter and partly across the farm fields. There is a small pond along the way that is a small haven for birds offering cover of shrubs and a small tree. I came across an owl here who seemed quite interested in my presence before flying off. The marked farm trail ends at the small gardens and chicken coup at the backside of the farm house. From here turn left to the parking area. The farm is active in the spring and summer months with gardeners and children at programs. The farm trails are open to the public from dawn to dusk. Do keep in mind though to wear proper shoes as the trail is all grass. The frosty farm trail quickly turned in morning dew on this walk.

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Perimeter Path in the East Field

Blackall Preserve – Cumberland

  • Blackall Preserve
  • Old West Wrentham Road, Cumberland, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°59’36.20″N, 71°27’33.89″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 23, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.3 miles
  • Fairly easy.

 

Tucked away along a road less traveled in the northwestern part of Cumberland is this lesser known preserve. The road itself is dotted by historical homes that date back over 200 years and abut the property. The Blackall Preserve offers trails that wind around the property passing impressive stone walls from yesteryear. The canopy above is mostly oak and maple with an occasional beech, pine, and birch. There is a small pond on the western edge of the preserve as well. The trails are easy to follow and are well defined. However, they are not blazed nor is there currently a map for the property. There are three entrances to the property along Old West Wrentham Road. The main entrance is just north of utility pole number 53. An abundance of birds and deer tracks were observed here at the time of this hike.

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Snow Covered Trail at Blackall

Blackstone River Byway – Lincoln/Cumberland

  • Blackstone River Byway
  • School Street, Lincoln, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°57’10.51″N, 71°27’9.88″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 6, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

The Blackstone River Byway is a utility road that follows the eastern shore of the Blackstone River in Cumberland just north of Albion Road. Between that road and the river is a short footpath of a trail that climbs up to an impressive outcrop of rocks that overlook the river. The trail is entirely in Cumberland but you must park at the bike path parking area just over the river in Lincoln. From the parking area follow School Street over the bridge that crosses the river. From here you will get a great view of the Albion Dam. Just after the bridge and before the gated road is a narrow footpath that heads north along the river. The path passes the dam before heading uphill to the overlook. This is a great little spot to sit and contemplate. This hike out and back (and for this hike description featuring just about all the highlights) is about a half mile. If you choose to further explore, follow any of the spur trails to the Byway road and head north. The utility road is heavily traveled by ATV’s and not so much utilized by hikers. The road follows a buried petroleum pipeline for a distance before pipeline crosses the river. You will see a clearing on the left with a sign down below warning of the pipeline crossing the river. A hike to this point (and back to the parking area) is just about 2 miles. If you care do a loop of 4 miles, a fellow hiker recently explored this option. You can do so by continuing along the dirt road after it passes the utility clearing on the left. Here is a link to her website with a description and a map.

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Sunset Along The Blackstone From The Overlook.

Lynch Park – Cumberland

  • James H. Lynch Jr. Memorial Park – Cumberland Monastery
  • Diamond Hill Road, Cumberland, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°56’29.30″N, 71°24’7.27″W
  • Last Time Hiked: January 1, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.9 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

The well known Cumberland Monastery has miles of trails that winds through woods and fields. Most do not know that there is another entrance a little further north along Diamond Hill Road at Lynch Park. These lesser visited trails, as well with the rest of the Monastery, has recently been blazed. For this hike we decided to do a short loop of just under of a mile that started at the gate by the parking area. We first followed the yellow blazed trail that follows the power lines. Just before an open field at one of the towers we turned right onto the orange blazed Lynch Trail that winds uphill and to the north before looping back to near the beginning of the hike. There are stone walls and young beeches among the older pines along this trail that towers over the valley below. To add more miles to this hike continue along the yellow blazed trail into the heart of the Monastery property instead of turning onto the orange trail.

Trail maps can be found at: Lynch Park

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Along The Lynch Trail

Lonsdale Marsh – Lincoln/Cumberland

This walk follows the southern most portion of the Blackstone River Bike Path into Cumberland. Starting at the parking area at the old Lonsdale Drive-In I followed the bike path south to John Street. The bike path crosses over the Blackstone River into Cumberland, then crosses Route 123. The remainder of the bike path follows the edge of the marsh and consists of a paved path and an area of boardwalk. After the boardwalk there is a trail to the right. The trail is narrow and overgrown in areas. The trail will bring you to the rivers edge. By walking to the end of the bike path and back and also following the trail you can achieve a little over a mile and a half.

Trail map can be found at: Lonsdale Marsh.

Approaching The Boardwalk

Approaching The Boardwalk

Blackstone River South – Cumberland/Lincoln

  • Blackstone River Bikeway – South
  • Front Street, Cumberland, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°56’17.85″N, 71°25’55.60″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 13, 2015
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.3 miles
  • Easy.

For the third a final leg of the Blackstone River Bikeway walk we completed the southern 3 or so miles. Starting where we left off in May at Front Street in Cumberland we immediately made our way into Lincoln by crossing the Blackstone River. The bike path then turns to the left passing the Kelly House. This stretch of the bike path follows the Blackstone Canal on the right for a couple miles. The river it self is on the left most of the walk. There are several spur trails to the left that lead to the river. Along this stretch we came across many animals and insects such as geese, ducks, chipmunks, squirrels, birds of all sorts, turtles, fish, butterflies, and dragonflies. Soon we were crossing the river again on a bridge that crosses at the Pratt Dam. This would lead us back into Cumberland again briefly before crossing Mendon Road. After crossing the busy road we again crossed a bridge back into Lincoln and into what was once the Lonsdale Drive In. It is now a restored marsh with several wildflowers. We concluded our walk here at the old entrance to the drive-in. The bike path from this point continues south for about a half mile before becoming a bike lane along city streets to Providence.

Trail map can be found at: Blackstone River South.

The Bike Path Following The Canal

The Bike Path Following The Canal

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