Archive for the ‘ ~CUMBERLAND RI~ ’ Category

Blackall Preserve – Cumberland

  • Blackall Preserve
  • Old West Wrentham Road, Cumberland, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°59’36.20″N, 71°27’33.89″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 23, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.3 miles
  • Fairly easy.

 

Tucked away along a road less traveled in the northwestern part of Cumberland is this lesser known preserve. The road itself is dotted by historical homes that date back over 200 years and abut the property. The Blackall Preserve offers trails that wind around the property passing impressive stone walls from yesteryear. The canopy above is mostly oak and maple with an occasional beech, pine, and birch. There is a small pond on the western edge of the preserve as well. The trails are easy to follow and are well defined. However, they are not blazed nor is there currently a map for the property. There are three entrances to the property along Old West Wrentham Road. The main entrance is just north of utility pole number 53. An abundance of birds and deer tracks were observed here at the time of this hike.

TWRI-Blackall

Snow Covered Trail at Blackall

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Blackstone River Byway – Lincoln/Cumberland

  • Blackstone River Byway
  • School Street, Lincoln, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°57’10.51″N, 71°27’9.88″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 6, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

The Blackstone River Byway is a utility road that follows the eastern shore of the Blackstone River in Cumberland just north of Albion Road. Between that road and the river is a short footpath of a trail that climbs up to an impressive outcrop of rocks that overlook the river. The trail is entirely in Cumberland but you must park at the bike path parking area just over the river in Lincoln. From the parking area follow School Street over the bridge that crosses the river. From here you will get a great view of the Albion Dam. Just after the bridge and before the gated road is a narrow footpath that heads north along the river. The path passes the dam before heading uphill to the overlook. This is a great little spot to sit and contemplate. This hike out and back (and for this hike description featuring just about all the highlights) is about a half mile. If you choose to further explore, follow any of the spur trails to the Byway road and head north. The utility road is heavily traveled by ATV’s and not so much utilized by hikers. The road follows a buried petroleum pipeline for a distance before pipeline crosses the river. You will see a clearing on the left with a sign down below warning of the pipeline crossing the river. A hike to this point (and back to the parking area) is just about 2 miles. If you care do a loop of 4 miles, a fellow hiker recently explored this option. You can do so by continuing along the dirt road after it passes the utility clearing on the left. Here is a link to her website with a description and a map.

TWRI-Byway

Sunset Along The Blackstone From The Overlook.

Lynch Park – Cumberland

  • James H. Lynch Jr. Memorial Park – Cumberland Monastery
  • Diamond Hill Road, Cumberland, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°56’29.30″N, 71°24’7.27″W
  • Last Time Hiked: January 1, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.9 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

The well known Cumberland Monastery has miles of trails that winds through woods and fields. Most do not know that there is another entrance a little further north along Diamond Hill Road at Lynch Park. These lesser visited trails, as well with the rest of the Monastery, has recently been blazed. For this hike we decided to do a short loop of just under of a mile that started at the gate by the parking area. We first followed the yellow blazed trail that follows the power lines. Just before an open field at one of the towers we turned right onto the orange blazed Lynch Trail that winds uphill and to the north before looping back to near the beginning of the hike. There are stone walls and young beeches among the older pines along this trail that towers over the valley below. To add more miles to this hike continue along the yellow blazed trail into the heart of the Monastery property instead of turning onto the orange trail.

Trail maps can be found at: Lynch Park

twri-lynch

Along The Lynch Trail

Lonsdale Marsh – Lincoln/Cumberland

This walk follows the southern most portion of the Blackstone River Bike Path into Cumberland. Starting at the parking area at the old Lonsdale Drive-In I followed the bike path south to John Street. The bike path crosses over the Blackstone River into Cumberland, then crosses Route 123. The remainder of the bike path follows the edge of the marsh and consists of a paved path and an area of boardwalk. After the boardwalk there is a trail to the right. The trail is narrow and overgrown in areas. The trail will bring you to the rivers edge. By walking to the end of the bike path and back and also following the trail you can achieve a little over a mile and a half.

Trail map can be found at: Lonsdale Marsh.

Approaching The Boardwalk

Approaching The Boardwalk

Blackstone River South – Cumberland/Lincoln

  • Blackstone River Bikeway – South
  • Front Street, Cumberland, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°56’17.85″N, 71°25’55.60″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 13, 2015
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.3 miles
  • Easy.

For the third a final leg of the Blackstone River Bikeway walk we completed the southern 3 or so miles. Starting where we left off in May at Front Street in Cumberland we immediately made our way into Lincoln by crossing the Blackstone River. The bike path then turns to the left passing the Kelly House. This stretch of the bike path follows the Blackstone Canal on the right for a couple miles. The river it self is on the left most of the walk. There are several spur trails to the left that lead to the river. Along this stretch we came across many animals and insects such as geese, ducks, chipmunks, squirrels, birds of all sorts, turtles, fish, butterflies, and dragonflies. Soon we were crossing the river again on a bridge that crosses at the Pratt Dam. This would lead us back into Cumberland again briefly before crossing Mendon Road. After crossing the busy road we again crossed a bridge back into Lincoln and into what was once the Lonsdale Drive In. It is now a restored marsh with several wildflowers. We concluded our walk here at the old entrance to the drive-in. The bike path from this point continues south for about a half mile before becoming a bike lane along city streets to Providence.

Trail map can be found at: Blackstone River South.

The Bike Path Following The Canal

The Bike Path Following The Canal

Blackstone River Central – Lincoln/Cumberland

  • Blackstone River Bikeway – Central
  • New River Road, Lincoln, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°58’5.51″N, 71°28’1.02″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 20, 2015
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.0 miles
  • Easy.

Starting where we left off a couple weeks ago (Blackstone River North), we continued our walk along the Blackstone River Bikeway. The first mile or so of this walk is along a stretch of the bike path that is flanked by the railroad on the right and the river on the left. Most of it is fenced, but there are occasional trailheads that appear along the left. The Albion Dam soon appears on the river to the left. The water cascades over the dam then ripples downstream under the School Street Bridge. This is a good spot to relax and take in the scene. At the halfway point of this walk we crossed a bridge that spans the river. We were now entering Cumberland and the bike path climbs a small hill. There is some impressive looking ledge at this location. Soon we came to a railroad crossing where the bike path switches sides. Do not walk down the tracks. These are active tracks and occasionally a freight train will come rumbling through. We then continued along the bike path crossing under Interstate 295. About 2/10 of a mile after the interstate a path appears on the right. It leads to the river. Another path follows the river downstream pass the Ashton Dam. This path loops back to the bike path. We then continued south along the bike path crossing under the arched bridge that carries Route 116 over the Blackstone River. We then came to the Ashton Mill complex where we concluded this leg of the Blackstone River walk.

Trail map can be found at: Blackstone River Central.

The Albion Dam Along The Blackstone River.

The Albion Dam Along The Blackstone River.

Valley Falls – Cumberland

This suburban park sits at the extreme southern end of Cumberland along the Blackstone River. The park is a maze of paths that wanders through the ruins of a former textile mill. Today, all that is left of the mill are some stone foundations and the raceways that were built. Another feature of this park is the dam along the Blackstone River. The park is technically the southern terminus of the Blackstone River Bicycle Path. For more information about the site and surrounding area click here.

I did not find a trail map on-line.

Valley Falls Heritage Park

Valley Falls Heritage Park