Archive for the ‘ ~FALL RIVER MA~ ’ Category

Veterans Memorial Bridge – Fall River/Somerset

  • Veterans Memorial Bridge/Pvt. Michael E. Bouthot Bicycle Path
  • Grand Army Highway, Somerset, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°43’43.18″N, 71° 9’37.92″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 8, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.9 miles
  • Fairly easy.

On the tenth anniversary of the September 11th terrorist attacks, the new bridge spanning the Taunton River between Fall River and Somerset was dedicated to area veterans. The bike path that is on the north side of the bridge was then dedicated to Pvt. Michael E. Bouthot, a young resident of Fall River, who died in 2006 in the war in Iraq. The bridge and bike path officially opened a month later. The bike path in its entirety is just under a mile long starting at the intersection of Grand Army Highway and Brayton Avenue in Somerset. It then heads downhill to Riverside Avenue where there is a memorial to Pvt. Bouthot. The path then crosses the Taunton River on the bascule drawbridge. From the bridge you can see a power plant just north of Breed Cove and several miles beyond it. To the south you can see the old Brightman Street Bridge, Braga Bridge, Battleship Cove, Brayton Point, the Borden Flats Lighthouse, and the Mount Hope Bridge. After crossing the bridge the path curves around and under the bridge before concluding at Wellington Street in Fall River.

TWRI-VetsBridge

Veterans Memorial Bridge

Fall River Waterfront – Fall River

Between Bicentennial Park and Fall River Heritage State Park is a 1.3 mile walk that follows the shore of the Taunton River. This walk follows paved paths, concrete walks, and wooden boardwalks. The views include the Braga Bridge to the south and beyond in the distance you can see the Mount Hope Bridge. To the west are the massive cooling towers of the Brayton Point Power Plant. Just under the Braga Bridge you can catch a glimpse of the Borden Flats Lighthouse. The highlight of this walk however, is Battleship Cove, a maritime museum featuring the worlds largest collection of World War II era ships. Among the ships here at the U.S.S. Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. (850) which is a destroyer and the U.S.S. Massachusetts (59) which is a battleship that saw significant action during World War II. Also at Battleship Cove is a memorial to the September 11th attacks. At the northern end of this walk at Bicentennial Park is a monument commemorating the battle of Iwo Jima.

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The boardwalk looking towards Battleship Cove.

Freetown South – Freetown/Fall River

  • Freetown South – Freetown State Forest
  • Bell Rock Road, Freetown, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°45’33.32″N, 71° 4’17.59″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 14, 2014
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.8 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

EXERCISE EXTREME CAUTION NEAR THE EDGES OF THE CLIFFS.

 

I ventured into the Freetown State Forest for the first of three planned hikes. This morning I choose to do the southern end of the forest. I was joined by a small group of hikers from The Providence County Hiking Club. We started from a parking area along Bell Rock Road. There are two trail heads here. We took the one by the large sign at the south end of the lot. The trail here is short, narrow, and well rutted from ATV use. It leads to a dirt road named Haskell Path. At the end of the trail we came to a gate. We turned right onto Haskell Path and followed it slightly downhill to a four way intersection with gates, passing several side trails we ignored. At the four way intersection we turned left onto a trail named Ledge Road. The road continues downhill and is flanked by the forest. We soon approached a fork in the road. We stayed to the left and continued to the a small stone bridge that crosses Rattlesnake Brook. (The road to the right would be our return route). After crossing the brook, and crossing briefly into Fall River, the road begins climbing, passing several side paths, as well as the Pond Trail and the Mothers Brook Trail. The road, well worn from the weather in areas, passes through areas of beech and pine trees. At the top of the hill a large area of ledge appears on the right. Use caution in this area. We explored the area enjoying the overlook. The view to the east looks over the pond below and the forest as far as the eye can see. We then returned to the road continuing north and started gradually going downhill. We then took a right onto the next road followed by another almost immediate right. This road leads to the shore of the pond. From here you get a good perspective of how high the ledge is. Here there is an intersection where we would turn left. However, we explored the short road along the edge of the pond before continuing. There are a few spots to enjoy the view here and there is a waterfall as well. We then turned left at the intersection and continued the hike crossing Rattlesnake Brook once again. Shortly after the brook we encountered another fork. The trail to the left is the Wampanoag Path. We stayed to the right passing a rather large gravel pit on the left before reaching the first fork we encountered. Here we went left and retraced our steps back to the parking area.

Trail map can be found at: Freetown South.

The Ledge and Pond

The Ledge and Pond

Tattapanum Trail – Fall River

  • Tattapanum Trail
  • Wilson Road, Fall River, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°44’10.91″N, 71° 6’11.73″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 28, 2014
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.0 mile
  • Easy with slight elevation.

 

This loop trail in the woods of Fall River abuts the North Watuppa Pond. The trail begins from a small area for parking along the edge of Wilson Road. After passing the gate, a fellow hiker and I followed the trail to the split. At the spilt there is a sign with a brief history of the property and its namesake. We followed the trail to the right meandering through a fern covered forest of pine, birch, maple, oak, and holly trees to name just a few. We also stumbled upon some survey monuments with the letters “RC” inscribed in them. The “RC” is an abbreviation for the Reservoir Commission. After passing the Cobble Crossing and some stone walls we came to the East Look. Unfortunately at this time of the year the leaves on the tree prohibit a good view of the pond below. We then continued along the loop slightly uphill into a thick of a pine grove. From here we made our descent down to the split then retracing our steps back to the car.

 

I did not find a trail map on-line.

Along The Tattapanum Trail

Along The Tattapanum Trail

Copicut Woods – Fall River

  • Copicut Woods/Miller Brook Conservation Area
  • Indiantown Road, Fall River, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°42’32.22″N, 71° 3’54.30″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 14, 2013
  • Approximate distance hiked: 4.2 miles
  • Fairly Easy

 

Most people do not know that a large section of Fall River is wooded. Copicut Woods is a good example of this. This hike made for a nice, well… stroll through the woods. Starting at the parking lot at Indiantown Road, I crossed the street and started following the Shockley Trail. Before the trail crosses the next road there is quite of beech trees. One of the nice features of this hike was that the trail intersections are numbered. I crossed Yellow Hill Road at intersection 2 continuing to the end of the trail. I then turned right at intersection 3 following the trail over the first of several stone bridges. This trail led to an old homestead where there are remains of a barn and house. I turned left at intersection 6 then right at intersection 7. Before me was a long road with a canopy of trees and stone walls on each side. This is Miller Lane and I followed it to intersection 10 where I turned left. I would suggest going by intersection 11 for now, turn left at intersection 12 (not marked on the map, and the path that continues forward is just a utility easement) and follow it down to a stone bench by the Miller Brook. Beyond this point there is not much. The path will come out to a small parking area and there are no good views of the reservoir. From the stone bench I made my way back to intersection 11 and turned right there following the trail to intersection 12. I then turned left, right at 7, then left at the “Ed Shed”, and finally right to retrace my steps back to the car. You could add more distance to this hike if you include the Horseshoe Trail.

Trail map can be found at: Copicut Woods

Miller Lane

Miller Lane