Archive for the ‘ ~GLOCESTER RI~ ’ Category

Chace Nature Trail – Glocester

 

On the north side of the West Glocester Elementary School is a short nature trail that meanders through a wooded area on the school grounds. The trail offers various types of trees with an occasional birdhouse. There are also benches and picnic trails along the trail.

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Along The Chace Nature Trail

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Ponaganset Covered Bridge Trail – Glocester

  • Ponaganset Covered Bridge Trail
  • Anan Wade Road, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°51’59.71″N,71°42’43.31″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 15, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.0 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

The cross country course behind Ponaganset High School in Glocester may be one of the best kept secret trails in the state. Open to the public when not in use for track meets and other school events, this trail offers a nice 2 mile stroll through some beautiful wooded property that is zigzagged with small seasonal streams. The bridges across these streams are the highlights of this walk, one being a covered bridge. For this walk, you start from the north parking lot of the High School by the superintendents office. Stay to the right and make your way to the football field and track. On the right is the trailhead marked with a sign. Follow the stone dust trail and you soon come to the covered bridge. Continuing, the trail follows the perimeter of a ball field before turning slightly to the right and uphill. At the top of the hill the trail turns to the left and slightly downhill to a four way intersection dubbed “Grand Central Station”. For this walk take the second left. You will follow a loop trail the traverses through the southern end of the property eventually returning to the four way intersection. From the intersection continue straight up and over the hill, back down to the covered bridge, returning to the parking lot.

 

Map can be found at: Ponaganset Covered Bridge Trail.

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Covered Bridge at Ponaganset

Dark Swamp – Glocester

  • Dark Swamp
  • Willie Woodhead Road, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°54’3.72″N, 71°45’48.62″W
  • First Time Hiked: September 16, 2017
  • Last Time Hiked: September 1, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.6 miles
  • Moderate due to navigation, otherwise fairly easy with some elevation.

 

In November of 1923, two young explorers set out from Providence to find the swamp that for years was reputed to be cursed. The stories date back to when the colonists were settling the area. It is believed that they were warned by the Natives of this area and its curse to keep the colonists from this land. It is also said that several of the colonists who did not heed the warning were never seen again. These two young explorers never did reach their destination that day. They were Clifford Eddy and H.P. Lovecraft, (at the time unknown) horror story authors. In September of 2017, a group of hikers led by members of the Northwest Rhode Island Supporters of Open Space set out to Dark Swamp ignoring the heeded warnings. They were successful! Dark Swamp was found and they all made it out to tell the story. It is suggested however, that if you do head out for this hike, be sure to use a GPS device as most of the trails are not marked and there are plenty of side trails and spurs. Starting at a cul-de-sac at the end of Willie Woodhead Road we made our way along the trail in a southerly direction as it climbed slightly uphill. Ahead this trail meets the North South Trail. Bear to the right and follow the blue blazed trail. There are trails to both the right and left that are mostly grass covered. Ignore them and continue straight. At the half mile mark there is a trail on the right with a cellar hole. You will return on this trail. Continue straight passing over a large outcrop of a rock believe to be a threshing rock. Shortly after this rock on the left there is another narrow and grassy trail. Take it, the trail splits, stay to the left and follow the narrow trail. It leads to old ice pond. From here retrace your steps back to the blue blazed North South Trail and continue south. Starting looking for a trail on the right (about 9/10 of a mile into the hike). Take the right, then almost immediately left. Continue straight, passing yet another spur trail on the right, the trail vanishes into a field of ferns. Ahead and below is the first glimpse of the Dark Swamp with its near black water covered with a twisted and interlaced brush over it.  This area offers many other sights of swamps. Turn around passing the spur trail (now on your left) and instead of turning right onto the trail you came in on, turn left. This trail, unmarked, winds to the west and then north passing some stone walls before ending. Take note of your surroundings here. At the intersection you will exit to the right when you return. For now turn left. This trail will lead you into the depths of Dark Swamp. Shortly you will see another swamp on the right. Just beyond this swamp you will start to see piles of rocks. These are cairns, similar to the ones in Parker Woodland. Locals believe they may be from the Native Americans. Continuing ahead you will come to another trail intersection. Stay to left here and soon you will catch a glimpse of the swamp once again on the left. At the time of this hike we saw frogs and a heron here. The trail then climbs up and over a rather impressive hill before winding through a hemlock grove. The trail all but ends as you approach the large body of water created by beavers. Here is one of the largest swamps in the area complete with beaver dam and beaver hut. This is great spot for a break and to take in nature. From here retrace your steps pass the swamps and cairns. Continue straight at the “noted” intersection. It soon passes an old building and cellar hole on the left. At the end of this trail turn left. You are now back on the blue blazed North South Trail. The trail back to the car will be on your left. Hunting is allowed here, blaze orange is required during hunting season. And again, use GPS here.

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The Swamp at the End of The Trail. (Note the Beaver Hut)

Chepachet Village – Glocester

 

Chepachet is a quintessential New England village that has transcended from a crossroads of yesteryear to a bustling living history museum. Settled in the early 1700’s, Chepachet Village became the center of the newly founded town of Glocester. Chepachet would become a mill village in the 1800’s using the river as a source of power. Chepachet also became a major crossroad west of Providence as several highways and pikes intersected here. The village also has some interesting history. This is where the Dorr Rebellion originated from and also where a traveling show was attacked resulting in the death of the elephant known as “Betty”. We started this walk from town hall and headed north along the westerly side of Putnam Pike. When we reached the fire station we turned left and followed an old dirt lane. The lane turns to a path and narrows substantially at its end as it overlooks the Chepachet River at Mill Pond and the remains of a dam. Retracing our steps back out to the bustling village when then turned left (northerly), and crossed the bridge over the river. Near the end of the bridge is a plaque commemorating the incident on May 25, 1826 in which Betty the elephant was killed. Just beyond here is the first of several shops, an antique shop called the Old Post Office. After a brief visit, we continued up the street and crossed at the crosswalk. We then proceeded north and turned right onto Old Mill Lane. This quiet road offers a few homes from yesteryear including the 1790 tenement house. The road turns to the right and becomes Elbow Street. This short road was once home to a large cotton and wool mill. Along the edge of the road you can catch a glimpse of some of the remaining foundations. It is all that is left of the mill that burnt down in 1897. The road then turn to the right once again and becomes Tannery Road. There are several very old and well preserved homes along this stretch. The last building on the right is the home of the Glocester Heritage Society. It was built in 1814 as the Job Armstrong Store. In the rear, the URI Master Gardeners maintain the walking path and flower gardens. Turning left onto Putnam Pike, we first stopped by the Brown and Hopkins Country Store. Built in 1799 by Timothy Wilmarth, it has been the country store since 1809. The store has a great variety of “penny” candies and candles to name just a few. Up next was the Town Trader, said to be built in the 1690’s and is the oldest building in the village. The architecture of this building is amazing, let alone the selection of antique gadgets including doorknobs and lanterns. Crossing the river once again, we next came upon the Old Stone Mill. This impressive stone building, built in 1814, was one of the first mills built in Chepachet. The next stop, the reportedly haunted Stage Coach Tavern. A working restaurant (Tavern on Main), this building, built in 1800, once served as a hotel and tavern for passerby’s. It was also William Dorr’s headquarters during the Dorr Rebellion of 1842. Today you can sit with the ghost and have a steak or seafood dinner. From here return to town hall, but first take a peek behind the building. There are two more buildings of interest. The one room Evans School House and the home of the Glocester Light Infantry.

 

Map can be found at: Chepachet Village.

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An Old Home in Chepachet Village.

Burton Woodlands – Glocester

  • Burton Woodlands
  • Joe Sweet Road, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°54’7.30″N, 71°41’52.70″W
  • Last Time Hiked: November 8, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.9 miles
  • Fairly easy with slight elevation.

 

The entrance to this Glocester Land Trust property is just about across the street from where the Cemetery Trail of Sprague Farm comes out onto Joe Sweet Road. In fact this lesser known trail system would make a good addition to a hike at Sprague Farm. The main trail is a wide cart path that is covered in pine needles and heads in a southerly direction. The trail passes a narrower trail and a cellar hole to the left before heading onto private property. The narrower trail loops crossing over a small babbling brook. The brook could be impassable after heavy rains as it is quite deep at the trail crossing. There is also another narrow trail that seems to dead end toward private property as well. The trail system is probably about a mile to a mile and a half in total. I did some backtracking while exploring this property giving me a little more mileage.

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Main Trail at Burton Woodlands

Sprague Hill – Glocester

  • Sprague Hill
  • Putnam Pike, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°55’15.19″N, 71°44’17.69″W
  • Last Time Hiked: October 28, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.7 miles
  • Moderate, areas can be difficult due to weather.

This three and a half mile hike explores the lesser traveled paths of two well known hiking destinations and a connecting road between them that crosses over Sprague Hill. Starting at a parking area along Putnam Pike for the Durfee Hill Management Area follow the dirt road beyond the gate. The road winds south before first coming to an area on the left with a small waterfall and some old stone work along Brandy Brook. Continuing ahead the road turns to the right. The trail to the left you will return on. At the next split the follow the road to the left and it will come to Burlingame Reservoir. There are some blazes and marks in this area presumably used by cyclists, ignore them for this hike. Next you will cross the earthen dam of the reservoir. The view of is quite nice here. The next part of this hike can be quite difficult after some rain. The unmarked but relatively defined trail turns away from the reservoir. It is a very rocky trail and after some rain can be quite wet and somewhat flooded. Take your time here and be sure to follow the trail. It soon comes to an intersection. Take a good look around and familiarize yourself with the intersection. You will be returning to this point but following a different trail out. At this point turn right and follow the trail to the southwest. This trail is actually Elbow Rock Road and it is fairly narrow, channeled in areas, and travels gradually up Sprague Hill for about a half mile. Much like the previous trail, it is quite rocky and areas and will be wet, almost stream like, after significant precipitation. The trail is also flanked by areas of mountain laurel and hemlocks. Do note that there are “No Trespassing” signs on each side of the trail after you leave the Durfee Hill Management Area. The trail itself lies within a public right of way. Be sure to stay on this trail ignoring other trails that spur off in either direction until you reach the top of the hill at a four way trail intersection with a parking area. The trail to the left is actually the end of Sprague Hill Road and the lesser known small parking area is public parking for Sprague Farm. For this hike continue straight and follow the dirt road slightly downhill. You may notice white dot blazes here. This is part of the Sprague Farm trail network. Soon on the right you will find a narrow unmarked trail that crosses over a large section of outcrop. Turn here and follow the trail that climbs the hill. This is Elbow Rock. There are no sweeping views here but be aware of the edges. The rock is rather large and looms high above the surrounding forest. From here follow the trail over the rock and to the left back down to Elbow Rock Road. Turn left and retrace your steps back up and over Sprague Hill a little over a mile to the intersection that you had familiarized yourself with. From here follow the trail mostly straight, along the main trail, as it winds to the pond. There is a large field to the right if you choose to explore it. Next the trail comes to another earthen dam and a smaller pond on the left. After heavy rains this is also a challenge as an area of the dam is slightly compromised and water flows over it into Brandy Brook. Next there is a small bridge that crosses a stonework channel. Turn right and retrace your steps back to the parking area. Hunting is allowed in these areas, be sure to wear orange during hunting season.

Trail maps can be found at: Sprague Hill

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Burlingame Reservoir

Scotstun Town Forest – Glocester

  • Scotstun Town Forest
  • Chopmist Hill Road, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°53’52.80″N, 71°40’10.36″W
  • Last Time Hiked: October 21, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Fairly easy.

 

This property lies on the east shore of Smith and Sayles Reservoir. There is a short quarter mile trail that leads to the shore of the reservoir from Chopmist Hill Road. The trail head is just about opposite Hemlock Road next to utility pole number 124. The trail head is not by the sign a little further up the road, if you are not looking for it you will miss it. The trail winds through the woods canopy of pine, hemlock, and beech trees among others. The trail is not blazed but is definable enough to follow and dead ends at the reservoir. According to the trail map (which can be obtained at Glocester Town Hall) there are plans to add future trails.

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Smith And Sayles Reservoir

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