Posts Tagged ‘ Beach ’

Prudence North – Portsmouth

  • Prudence North
  • Neck Farm Road, Portsmouth, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°38’30.76″N, 71°20’44.46″W (3 miles from ferry)
  • Last Time Hiked: July 28, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 4.2 miles
  • Fairly easy.

 

Just north from the famed abandoned Garland Mansion is the trail head to the Providence Point Trail. There is a small area on the right just before the gate to park a vehicle. The trail and subsequent beach walk to Providence Point, the northern most point on the island is just a little over two miles long. If you were to also add the side trails to this hike the mileage in total would increase to about six miles. The land here at the northern end of the island is part of the Narragansett Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. Starting from the gate and heading north you will immediately find yourself on an old road that is covered with grass in most areas. The road is mowed often enough, but stay out of the areas of taller grass. Birds and berries are abundant here, especially the familiar call of the catbird. Black raspberry, wine berry, and bayberry are all along this 2 mile stretch. At the first intersection there are signs for Long Point Trail and Schoolhouse Trail. Long Point trail to the left would lead you at to the peninsula between Coogeshall Cove and Sheep Pen Cove. The Schoolhouse Trail to the right would lead you to Potters Cove. For this hike continue straight. On the right in the dense shrubs are the remains of an old schoolhouse. Soon you will see Coogeshall Cove on the left and its large marsh. Keep an eye out for egrets here. Beyond the cove you will catch a glimpse of Patience Island. Beyond the cove there are some unmarked trails that intersect the main trail, continue ahead and the trail starts to climb uphill before coming to the next intersection with signs. On the left is the Postal Ferry Trail that would lead you to the narrow channel between Prudence and Patience Islands. On the right is the Bear Point Trail that leads you to the East Passage just north of Bear Point. The intersection is the site of the North End Farm, long abandoned. All that remains are several cellar holes with an occasional interpretive sign. There was a barn, a house, and several other smaller buildings here, and the area with a lack of trees was the farm. Again be aware of the tall grass here. Continuing ahead along the Providence Point Trail you will pass some more shrubs and trees such as honeysuckle and crabapples. You will also pass a large stone wall on the right. At the end of the trail a narrow path leads you to the seashell beach strewed with sea lavender. Staying to your left will lead you to the point. From this perspective you can see the Warwick Neck Light, the Aldrich Mansion, Rocky Point, Conimicut Light, Colt State Park, and the Providence skyline eleven miles away. From here turn around and retrace your steps back to the parking area. To add extra mileage to the hike explore to side trails. This area tends to be very buggy particularly in the summer. It is advised to wear mosquito netting for this hike. Also ticks are very prevalent in this area. Be sure to check for them quite thoroughly, stay on the trails and out of the tall grass.

 

NOTE: If you plan on hiking on Prudence Island, be known that the island is not commercialized. There are no restaurants, lodging, or transportation services. There are no public restrooms on the island except a composting toilet by the T-Wharf at the southern end of the island, which is several miles from most hikes. Once you are off the ferry you are on your own. Bring everything you will need for a day hike with no services. Furthermore, ticks are in abundance on the island. It is necessary to take precautions including proper clothing, sprays, and frequent checks.

 

 

Map can be found at: Prudence North

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The Beach to Providence Point

Bluff Point – Groton

  • Bluff Point State Park And Coastal Reserve
  • Depot Road, Groton, CT
  • Trailhead:  41°20’8.76″N, 72° 2’0.90″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 14, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 4.6 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

Bluff Point State Park once made the CNN list of the 50 states natural wonders. Surprisingly enough, even though it has been on the to do list for quite a while, it took me a few years to finally venture down here to check it out. Groton is a long drive to most Rhode Islanders. Pack a lunch, make a daytrip out of it, get out of Rhode Island once in a while! This place is worth the drive. The park offers well defined trails and signage where needed. The trails are used by walkers, hikers, joggers, bicyclists, and horseback riders. Dogs are welcome but must be leashed. Starting just after sunrise from the seemingly large and nearly empty parking lot at the end of Depot Road we started following the wide gravel road trail just beyond the informational signs. The trail soon splits about one tenth of a mile into the park. Stay to the right here and continue along the main trail that follows the Poquonnock River. You then follow this trail for 1.3 miles until you reach Bushy Point Beach ignoring spur trails both narrow and wide. Along the way there are several spots that overlook the river and features in the distance. Across the river is the bustling Groton-New London Airport. There are views of the peninsulas and points that jut out into the river as well as the lighthouses further in the distance. The Avery Point Lighthouse at the University of Connecticut Avery Point campus is visible as well as the haunted New London Ledge Light. The trail also winds gently up and down small hills flanked by towering trees and passes some areas of marsh and wetlands. There are an abundance of birds here as well. Great blue herons, egrets, cormorants, hawks, robins, cardinals, and woodpeckers were all spotted on this hike. When we reached the beach we explored it for a few minutes. The beach itself extends westward for nearly a mile, but we only ventured in the area around the entrance. The beach is closed in areas during nesting season of least terns and piping plovers. Dogs and horses are not allowed on the beach between April and August. Back to the main trail we climbed up the small hill of the bluff. There are several spur trails to the edge of the bluff and the rocky beach below. The rocky shoreline makes for a good photograph and was also being used by a couple fishermen. Looking to the south you can see Fishers Island from here. Back on the main trail, it starts to wind to the east and then to the north passing Sunset Rock on the left before winding to a cellar hole at a trail intersection. The spot is well marked with a sign that explains that this was once the Winthrop Homestead, the former Connecticut Governor. After lingering at the cellar hole for a bit we decided to follow the less traveled trail to Mumford Cove. There is a sign here indicating which trail to follow. This trail winds downhill through an area of scattered boulders, tall trees, and a seasonal brook before coming to the cove. There are a couple spots along the trail to take a peek at the cove and rest your legs if you so choose. Continuing, now heading north, the trail becomes more of a grass road. There is a large wooded hill to the left and areas of thickets and shrubbery to the right. The trail soon ends at a gravel road that runs from Haley Farm to the parking area where this hike started. Turning left here, follow the gravel road to the large parking area where the car is park. The lot was nearly full when finished the hike. Bluff Point is a very popular recreation spot.

 

Map can be found at: Bluff Point.

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Boulder at Bluff Point

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Trail Flanked By Trees

Sapowet Marsh – Tiverton

  • Sapowet Marsh Managment Area
  • Sapowet Avenue, Tiverton, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°34’56.51″N, 71°12’33.63″W
  • Last Time Hiked: September 4, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.8 miles
  • Fairly easy, rocky beach walk.

 

Just by the bridge on the west side of Sapowet Avenue is a parking area for the small beach of the Sapowet Marsh Management Area. This small and rocky beach leads to Sapowet Point that overlooks the Sakonnet River. On the interior of the point are small pools of water and the marsh. At low tide there is more land to explore. Locals and fisherman frequent the area often and the scenery is perfect for a photographer. You will also find a very high concentration of fiddler crabs scurrying along the shore out by the point. Being a management area, hunting is allowed. Be sure to wear orange blaze during hunting season.

 

Map of the management area can be found at: Sapowet Marsh.

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Sapowet Marsh

Oakland Beach – Warwick

 

This beach at the tip of a peninsula overlooks Narragansett Bay. From here you see both the Newport Bridge and Jamestown Bridge. Sailboats and cabin cruisers are also a normal sight from here. The beach, and immediate area, is also usually quite busy. There are a few very popular restaurants just by the park and beach as well. One can get just about a mile of walking by following the beach to the extreme eastern edge of the park by the boat ramp, then back following the walking path pass the gazebo through the park, then following the wooden boardwalk and eventually the bike path to its western terminus at Strand Avenue… and then back.

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Boardwalk and Beach

Point Judith – Narragansett

  • Point Judith – Camp Cronin
  • Ocean Road, Narragansett, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°21’44.47″N, 71°29’8.45″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 22, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Rocky beach walk, otherwise easy.

 

Part of the South Shore Management Area on the western tip of Point Judith, this little spot known as Camp Cronin offers a few different terrains. There is a small walkway, by the Point Judith Fishermen’s Memorial, that leads up to a hill that offers a general view of the surrounding area. Then on each side of the breakwater are small beaches. The one to the east, exposed to the ocean, is very rocky and only suitable for walking during lower tides. The beach to the west, inside the safe harbor, is small and sandy. Exploring a little of each will give you a stroll of up to a half mile. The view of the Point Judith Lighthouse is phenomenal here. You are likely to find photographers, fishermen, and beach-goers here on most days.

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Point Judith Lighthouse

 

Pierce Beach Park – Somerset

  • Pierce Beach Park
  • Simbrom Drive, Somerset, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°45’57.43″N, 71° 8’3.22″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 10, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.8 miles
  • Easy with some slight elevation.

 

This little park along the shores of the Taunton River offers a little of everything. Here are a baseball field, a basketball court, and  a playground. The park offers just under a mile of walking paths that wind through a patch of woods and open fields. There are a couple sets of stairs that descend down to the beach. This strand can be narrow at high tide so it is best to visit at low tide for the beach walk. At the western edge of the beach is the mouth of The Creek. At low tide look for fiddler crabs scrambling across the beach. Because of its location, you will get a good view of the Taunton River to the south.

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Path to the Beach

The Glen/Sakonnet Greenway – Portsmouth/Middletown

  • The Glen/Sakonnet Greenway
  • Frank Cohelo Drive, Portsmouth, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°33’33.33″N, 71°14’25.54″W
  • Last Time Hiked: June 19, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 6.0 miles
  • Moderate due to distance, trails are fairly easy.

I joined the Appalachian Mountain Club – Narragansett Chapter for their hike of The Glen and Sakonnet Greenway. They opted to do this hike as a one way trek, therefore the route that I will describe requires car spotting. We started from the parking lot at The Glen along Frank Cohelo Drive. We first made our way down a short walkway that leads to the road. We then turned right following the road past the Glen Manor House. We then passed the house to the south passing through the well maintained gardens. From here are wonderful views of the Sakonnet River. As we approached the edge of the lawn a trail appears to the right that leads into the woods. Following this trail we soon came to the beach below. To the south you can see Sandy Point. We followed the beach south for a short distance and turned right onto a trail as wide as a cart-path back into the woods. The trail soon crosses over a stream and then follows it to an old abandon building. The stone work near and around the building is quite impressive. Take note of the archway of the sluice by the building. We then continued following the trail to the end of The Glen property. We turned left onto a narrow paved road and followed it about 500 feet to a dirt road on the right. This is Linden Lane. We followed the road for about four tenths of a mile as we passed the Newport Polo Grounds to the left. Ahead in the distance we could see the historic Leonard Brown House. After the Polo Grounds, but before the house, on the left is the northerly trailhead of the Sakonnet Greenway. From here we started our southerly trek first passing the Polo Grounds to the left before entering the Pennfield School property. The trail traverses through areas of thick shrubs and tall trees before coming to the white gate at Sandy Point Avenue. After crossing the street we approached the Portsmouth Loop Trail. The trail follows the perimeter of a large open field. Be warned though that the field is surrounded by an electric fence. We opted to turn left here and follow the east edge of the loop while heading south. After leaving the loop trail we passed through a short section of woods before emerging out to another small field. The trail soon led into a wooded area. The trail crossed a couple small streams by bridges and boardwalks. After coming out of the woods again the trail followed the edge of another large field. Soon we came to a set of turnstiles, continuing straight the trail winded through a narrow stretch of woods that divided two fields. The trail then turned to the right following the southern edge of the field that was to the right. Ahead is a kiosk with the trail map near the road crossing. After crossing Bramans Lane the trail turns to the west between another field of tall grass and a stone wall. The trail then turns left keeping the field to the left. Wildflowers are abundant along this stretch. Soon we were on the property of the Newport National Golf Course. The Sakonnet Greenway at this point is well marked by signs as it skims the perimeter of the golf course. For the next two miles the trail is on the golf course property. On several occasions we caught glimpses of the greens and the golfers using them. At time the trail uses the road for the golf carts. There are also places to stop along the way to use the restroom. Also along this stretch, just after then bend after the gazebo the Greenway leaves Portsmouth and enters into Middletown. At the end of the golf course property the trail comes out to Mitchells Lane. We turned left here and followed the road about one tenth of a mile. Across the street is the trail that leads to the Middletown Loops. We followed this trail to the next intersection and turned left. We then followed this trail, part of the Middletown Southern Loop which is occasionally marked with yellow blazes, to the Wyatt Road Soccer Complex where we concluded the hike. This hike highlights the true beauty of Aquidneck Island. From its areas of forest to its sprawling farms.

Also thank you to Deb and Cyndy from the AMC for leading this hike.

Trail maps can be found at: Sakonnet Greenway

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View of The Sakonnet River From The Glen

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The Sakonnet Greenway Along A Field.