Posts Tagged ‘ Bike Paths ’

Merino Park – Providence

 

This city park is wedged between the Hartford Park Complex and Route 6 along the Wonnasquatucket River. Besides the fields, basketball courts, and playground, there is a paved walking path around the perimeter of the park, as well as a section of the Woonasquatucket River Greenway Bike Path that winds through the park following the river to Glenbridge Avenue. Doing both the loop and following the bike to Glenbridge Avenue and back will give you a walk of just around a mile.

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Bike Path Along The Woonasquatucket River

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Putnam River Trail – Putnam

 

The Putnam River Trail is a paved walking path that runs almost completely along the Quinebaug River from Providence Street to the Hale YMCA for a distance of 2 miles. While walking here take notice of the old mill buildings as well as the river. For this walk, start at the public parking area along Kennedy Drive just south of U.S. Route 44 and follow the paved walking path north towards the dam and waterfalls. After crossing U.S. 44 you will get a great view of the falls from the bridge. From here continue north into Rotary Park. The path splits and forms a turnaround with veterans memorials in the middle. The river Trail continues north to Providence Street for another half mile. For this walk follow the turnaround and continue now in a southerly direction crossing U.S. 44 once again and passing the parking area. The path follows both the river and Kennedy Drive at times being sidewalk for six tenths of a mile then comes to a pedestrian bridge that crosses the river. There was once a railroad crossing here, The views of the river are quite nice here. At the far end of the bridge there is signage indicating that the trail ends. Cross back over the bridge to Kennedy Drive. For this walk, turn left and retrace your steps back to the parking area to conclude the walk of a mile and a half. If you would like to add more distance turn right following the sidewalk. It soon turns into a walking path again passing a dog path and comes to a road with a bridge crossing the river. Turn right, cross the bridge, then left and follow the walking path to the YMCA. This is the newest section of the walk is about seven tenths of a mile. From the YMCA retrace your steps back to the parking area. If you choose to do the entire walking path out and back it will be about 4 miles of walking.

 

Map can be found at: Putnam River Trail

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Dam and Waterfalls along the Quinebaug River

Eagle Square – Providence

 

Much like Donigian Park slightly south, Eagle Square has an off road section of the Woonasquatucket River Greenway Bike Path run through it. The paved path, a quarter mile in length, weaves around former mills and factory buildings now heavily commercialized as it follows the river itself from Atwells Avenue to Eagle Street. There is very good signage here and plenty of spots the see the river itself. The walk out and back is just over a half mile.

 

Map can be found at: Eagle Square

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Bike Path Along The River

World War II Memorial Trail – Mansfield

  • World War II Memorial Trail – Nature Trail
  • Fruit Street, Mansfield, MA
  • Trailhead:  42° 0’22.08″N, 71°11’49.04″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 13, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.9 miles
  • Easy.

 

Two walks in one, literally. The World War II Memorial Trail follows a 1.6 mile stretch of the former Old Colony Railroad. The trail is a paved bike path that follows a straight section of former railroad from the Mansfield Airport along Fruit Street to the outer edges of downtown Mansfield at East Street. The trail is tree lined running through residential neighborhoods. At the midway point and west side of the bike path is the World War II Memorial Nature Trail. There is just about a mile of trails that meander through the woods here. The red blazed trail follows the perimeter of the property. The entire bike path out and back and the perimeter trail is just under 4 miles. Public parking is easier at Fruit Street.

 

Map can be found at: World War II Memorial Nature Trail

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The Bike Path in Mansfield

Quequechan River – Fall River

  • Quequechan River Rail Trail
  • Wordell Street, Fall River, MA
  • Trailhead:  41°41’47.97″N, 71° 8’45.86″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 21, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.8 miles
  • Easy.

 

The Quequechan River runs from South Watuppa Pond to the Taunton River and once had a series of eight waterfalls. Quequechan is a Wampanoag word meaning “falling water” in which the city received its name. Most of the river over the years has been built over or channeled for the massive mills that sprouted up along the river. Today a the river is the centerpiece of a former railroad bed that has been converted to a walking path/bike path. Starting from a parking area at the end of Wordell Street follow the paved path along the soccer field at Britland Park. Here you will find a informational kiosk showing the trails. Staying to the right I followed the main stretch of the trail down to Quequechan Street before turning around and retracing my steps. The trail passes over a series of wooden bridges and the river serves as a foreground of the historic mills. Once back to the kiosk, I opted to follow the paved path along between the soccer field and the river to its (currently) dead end and back. The map indicates that this may become a loop in the future. Once back to the kiosk again, I retraced my steps back to the parking area.

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The Fall River Mills serve as the backdrop of this walking path.

Seekonk River – Providence

  • Seekonk River – Blackstone Valley Bike Path
  • Pitman Street, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°49’36.39″N, 71°23’0.49″W
  • Last Time Hiked: February 27, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.2 miles
  • Easy.

 

The newest section of the Blackstone River Bike Path is just about ready to be opened. With that being said, I ventured out to take a sneak peak at it. The short section of bike path, six tenths of a mile one way, runs from Pitman Street opposite Witherby Park southerly to Gano Street by the end of the exit ramp from Interstate 195. This section of the bike path takes bicyclists off of the very busy Gano and Pitman Streets and puts them along the shore of the Seekonk River. Starting adjacent to the Salvation Army property the bike path winds very gently up and over a couple small hills passing behind the Wingate Residences and the Eastside Marketplace at Cold Spring Point. Soon you will get your first glimpse of the 1908 Crook Point Bascule Bridge. This structure was in operation and used by trains until the mid 1970’s. The bridge was then put into its famous upright position and abandoned. Some consider it an eyesore, others think of it as historic. Nonetheless, it is one of Providences most recognizable sights. The bike path then passes along Gano Park and its ball fields. There is an informational board along this stretch that explains the history of the park and nearby area. After being forced from his original settlement across the river, this is (actually nearby at Slate Rock) is where Roger Williams, the founder of Providence and Rhode Island, first step foot onto the shore in 1636. You can actually see the monument from this point by looking over the soccer field towards Gano Street. Looking out towards the river you can see the Washington Bridge that carries Interstate 195 over the Seekonk River. Across the river is the East Providence waterfront. You will also see two small islands, aptly named Twin Islands. Locals call them Cupcake Island and Pancake Island which they resemble respectively. The river is usually busy with canoes, kayaks, boats, and the Brown University crew teams. The bike path then passes the Gano Street boat ramp before turning to the right and ending at Gano Street. From here you can return back to Pitman Street for the 1.2 mile walk or you can follow the sharrows to India Point Park. With the grand opening soon, this bike path serves as a vital link to connect the waterfront of Providence from Blackstone Park to India Point and ultimately into downtown at Waterplace Park.

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Crook Point Bascule Bridge from the Bike Path.

Millville Lock/Triad Bridge – Millville

 

This walk follows the old railroad bed of the Boston and Hartford Railroad easterly to the Blackstone River from the parking area on the corner of Central and Hope Streets. Just recently this stretch has been paved and is now part of the newly opened Blackstone Greenway Bike Path. The old rail bed is flanked by trees and shrubs as it passes a residential neighborhood. At the sitting bench just beyond the mid way point of this walk is a set of wooden stairs that leads to the trail that winds down to the former Blackstone Canal along the river. Just to the left is a small footbridge that crosses Angelique Brook to the lock. The large stones that make the lock were put in place in the late 1820’s when the Blackstone Canal was being built. The lock served as a point where water levels could be controlled for the passage of barges along the canal. The Millville Lock is the most preserved along the stretch of the Blackstone River. Continuing back to the bike path and turning left you will soon come to a bridge that crosses the Blackstone River. After crossing the bridge turn around and take a good look around. To the left and slightly above is a towering concrete support of a bridge that was never built. That support, along with one behind your right shoulder and below in the river to your left were built to carry the Grand Trunk Rail over the Blackstone River. The president of that company died on the RMS Titanic in April of 1912. Though construction continued for several more years, plans for the railroad were scraped and the bridge was never built. Ahead, the bridge you just crossed, was the rail bridge that served as Boston and Hartford Railroads Southern New England Trunkline. Today it is used partly as the Blackstone River Greenway and also as a trail that runs from the state line at Thompson, Connecticut and runs easterly to Franklin. And finally, below and to the right you will see the Providence and Worcester Railroad bridge that crosses the river. That bridge is still in active use by trains. At one time in the early 20th century it was intended that three railroad bridges would cross the Blackstone River at the same spot, hence earning its name, Triad Bridge. At this point you are approximately a mile from the parking lot. For this walk return along the bike path back to your car, or you can add several more miles of walking by continuing east. The bike path continues about another mile and a half to its easterly terminus in Blackstone.

 

Trail map can be found at: Millville Lock

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Panoramic of the Triad Bridge

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