Posts Tagged ‘ Bird Sanctuary ’

Town Pond – Portsmouth

 

This out and back trail is well maintained and follows the west shore of Town Pond on one side and Founders Brook beyond the shrubs and thickets on the other side. The trail is accessible from an unmarked parking area on Anthony Road and the trail starts from the left side of the lot. The shrubbery along the trail serves as a haven for birds of all sorts. There are also utility poles here with nests for ospreys here. Hawks, owls, a great blue heron, ducks, and swans were all observed here at the time of this walk. The trail ends at the railroad tracks and across the way is the Bertha Russel Preserve which is essentially a tidal marsh protected for wildlife. This area is also significantly historical as this is approximately where Anne Hutchinson founded the colony which became Rhode Island in 1638. Founders Brook Park is nearby and has monuments commemorating the event.

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From the end of the trail looking over the Russel Preserve

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Pic-Wil Nature Preserve- Barrington

  • Pic-Wil (Picerelli-Wilson) Nature Preserve
  • Barrington, RI
  • Trailhead: Undisclosed
  • Last Time Hiked: June 25, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.8 miles
  • Easy.

 

Mr. Ray Marr of the Barrington Land Conservation Trust and an avid lover of purple martins gave a public tour today of this property in Barrington. The Pic-Wil Nature Preserve, named after the former land owners Picerelli and Wilson, became a Barrington Land Conservation Trust property in 1987. The property was once the home to a bottling factory known as Deep Rock Water Company. Today, the property has three large meadows,  a small forest and a salt marsh on the upper reaches of Narragansett Bay. This property is a haven for birds. In fact it is known for its purple martins as they nest and resort here in the late spring and into the summer. The purple martin is a type of swallow, and here at Pic-Wil they reside in one of several gourd rack nests. At the time of this hike there were 53 nesting purple martins and over 100 in total. There are several bird boxes here as well as there is an attempt to attract the Eastern Bluebird. House wrens, hawks, and ospreys were also spotted here. The property has been home to deer, coyote, fox, weasels, squirrels, chipmunks, and rabbits as well. The small network of trails here lead you through the fields, the forest, and into the salt marsh. There is an active bee hive here on the property as part of a local pollination project. From the property you can see the Conimicut Lighthouse and across the bay to Warwick, North Kingstown, and Prudence Island. The property is not open to the public except when guided tours are offered. The tours are usually posted on their website or Facebook page. For more information contact the Barrington Land Conservation Trust.

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Summer Meadow (Note the gourd rack nest)

Moonstone Beach – South Kingstown

  • Moonstone Beach
  • Moonstone Beach Road, South Kingstown, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°22’18.72″N, 71°34’20.77″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 17, 2017
  • Distance: Less than a mile April to September, up to 4 miles rest of year.
  • Easy Beach Walk.

 

Moonstone Beach for years was known for its reputation as being a nude beach. Today, no longer a nude beach, it is one of Rhode Islands most stunning beaches with its scattered stones along the sand. The beach surrounded and part of the Trustom Pond National Wildlife Refuge offers nearly 2 miles of strand between Roy Carpenters Beach and Green Hill Beach. The quiet beach is not easy to visit due to many seasonal restrictions. From May 1 to September 15 a parking pass is required to park along Moonstone Beach Road. Also in most of the spring and summer large sections of the beach are cordoned off to protect the piping plovers. The beach is stunningly beautiful in the winter months if you can handle the sometimes brutal winter winds. The best time to visit is very early spring, the autumn and winter. The beach is also noted for its birds as three salt ponds abut the beach including Trustom Pond and Cards Pond. Killdeers, Sandpipers, Herons, and Egrets are also known to frequent Moonstone. Be sure to bring a camera!!

 

More information about the birds of Moonstone Beach can be found here.

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Waves Crashing On Moonstone Beach

Godena Farm – Jamestown

 

This Conanicut Island Land Trust property in the north central part of Jamestown is a large open field with old farm equipment and stone structures. The once active produce farm is now being used for plantings of native trees and shrubs, many with berries to attract birds. Several birdhouses are here as well and there is an effort to build nesting boxes for the eastern bluebirds who have made Godena their home. The walk here is along grass mowed paths throughout the property and there is signage explaining the history and plans of this property. Also, snowshoeing has been encouraged here the last couple of winters.

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Godena Farm

Jacobs Point – Warren

Jacobs Point is in the extreme southwestern corner of Warren and is only accessible via the East Bay Bike Path. The property abuts the Rhode Island Audubon’s McIntosh Wildlife Refuge. There is a single out and back trail that runs from the bike path to the Warren River through a salt marsh and to the beach and point. There is an abundance of bird activity here as well as plenty of wildflowers. Though short in distance, the trail offers plenty of picture opportunities whether it be of wildlife or an open marsh with sailboats in the distance.

I did not find a trail map on-line.

A Stone Wall And Wild Flowers At Jacobs Point.

A Stone Wall At Jacobs Point.

Robbins Preserve – Thompson

  • Robbins Preserve
  • Fred Davis Road, Thompson, CT
  • Trailhead: 41°59’47.09″N, 71°48’38.38″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 4, 2015
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.5 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

This property, owned by the Wyndham Land Trust, offers a variety of different sights. The property sits on a series of rolling hills that is covered with areas of forest and open fields. The Five Mile River also passes through the property. We started the hike from the entrance at Fred Davis Road and followed the old gravel road slightly to the left, up and over the hill. The walk is entirely on these old gravel roads. We soon came to an open area. Ahead is the main road that leads further into the property. Slightly to the right you can see the road that takes you to the river. We followed the main road first nearly to its end passing through wooded areas and more open fields. Along the way we came across several birdhouses and various animal tracks. We also saw the first signs of spring with a variety of colorful lichens blooming. After retracing our steps, we then followed the road to the river. An old bridge spans the river which had a significant flow from all the recent snow-melt. We then followed a loop that traversed through an area that had been partially cleared at one point. From here we made our way back to the cars. At the entrance there is a box with trail maps.

 

Trail map can be found at: Robbins Preserve.

Five Mile River

Five Mile River

Goddard Woods – Plainville

 

The Natural Resource Trust of Plainville owns this property wedged between Route 152 and Turnpike Lake along Shepard Street. The property was once the site of a mill. There is a sign at the entrance explaining the history of the property. Today there are nothing but the remains of the mills including several small dams. There is a small series of trails here that weave throughout the property. Most follow the streams and along a manmade canal. The streams, with the dams, offer several spots with small waterfalls. The trails here are not blazed, however, the property is not big enough were you will get lost. The main trail offers most of the highlights. This trail is narrow first passing a large field before crossing the canal. The trail will eventually end at Turnpike Lake before passing several remains including an old wooden mill wheel. Some of the newer features includes a section of boardwalk and a bridge both built by local Boy Scouts.

 

I did not find a trail on-line.

Trail Along The Canal

Trail Along The Canal

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