Posts Tagged ‘ Boardwalks ’

Burton Trail – Ledyard

  • Burton Trail
  • Gallup Hill Road, Ledyard, CT
  • Trailhead:  41°26’11.78″N, 71°59’27.83″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 30, 2022
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.3 miles
  • Easy with slight elevation.

Behind the Ledyard High School Fields is a short trail network. The trails will lead you down into a valley with stone walls, vernal pools, and boardwalks crossing streams before climbing a hill to a historic cemetery. Here you will find graves dating back to the late 1700’s, some who served in the American Revolution. Using both the yellow and blue blazed trails will enable you to complete a loop.

Trail map can be found at: Burton Trail

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Winding Boardwalk

Allens Pond West – Dartmouth

  • Allens Pond West
  • Horseneck Road, Dartmouth, MA
  • Trailhead:  41°30’24.53″N, 71° 1’25.18″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 1, 2021
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.6 miles
  • Fairly easy trails with rocky beach walk.

                                                                            

Allens Pond is a Masachusetts Audubon property along Buzzards Bay. The property offers 6 to 7 miles of trails. It is a diverse and beautiful property offering several types of features from beaches to fields to woodlands. With that being said, I have decided to break the property into three separate hikes to maximize visiting all of the trails without having an overwhelming hike distance. This hike, the third, covers the western portion of the property. Starting from the Field Station parking area stay to the left and follow the grass mowed trail towards an opening in a stone wall. The trail crosses through another grass field before coming to a dirt road. Turn left here and almost immediately you will be turning right passing an open gate. You are now on the Quansett Trail. You start getting your first glimpses of Allens Pond on the right. Ahead you will cross a stone wall. Here a rather extensive boardwalk begins. The first highlight is a viewing area to the right. The second, just after the bend is a bridge that crosses over a marshy area. The trail, back on land now, traverses through thickets, pass boulders and more stone walls before coming to a stretch of “stepping stones”. At the next intersection there is a distinctive boulder. Stay to the left here and continue following the Quansett Trail. You will cross a small brook before coming to the Tree Top Trail. Again bear to the left and continue on he Quansett Trail. You will come upon more boulders and a “stretch of green” featuring skunk cabbage and fiddleheads in early spring. For this hike, turn right at the next intersection onto the Fresh Pond Trail. (The Quansett Trail continues ahead here into the central part of the property.) Along the trail to the left is a spur to Poison Ivy Rock. There is a nice view of the cove here and a good spot to take a break. I did not see any poison ivy! Continuing along the Fresh Pond Trail you will soon come to the trails namesake on the right. Look for nesting swans and geese here along with several other birds. The trail then turns to the right passing a sitting area before coming to the “stone bridge”. Here you will get another glimpse of Fresh Pond to the right. After crossing the bridge the trail ends in a bit completing a loop. Turn left back onto the Quansett Trail, passing the stepping stones, boardwalks, and to the dirt road. Turn left onto the dirt road and follow it about a tenth of a mile to an area with sweeping views of Allens Pond. Look for osprey atop the pole, herons, and egrets. There will be a information kiosk on the right with a sandy path. Follow this path to the rocky beach. At the beach you will see the Elizabeth Islands in the distance. On a clear day you may be able to make out the Gosnald Tower near the end of Cuttyhunk, the island to the right. Turn right onto the beach and follow it to the large outcrop. The trail then climbs over the outcrop coming back down the other side to another rocky beach. After the zigzagged stone walls to the right the trail turns to the right coming into a grass field. From here follow the grass mowed path to the parking area. Check out the Bayside Restaurant across the street for their blueberry pie!!

 

 

Map can be found at: Allens Pond West

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Stone Walls and Boardwalks

Dike Creek Reserve – Dartmouth

  • Dike Creek Reserve
  • Bakerville Road, Dartmouth, MA
  • Trailhead:  41°34’30.85″N, 70°58’38.22″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 10, 2021
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.5 miles
  • Fairly easy, some roots here and there.

Looking for a beautiful easy hike, fairly flat, no hills, fields, woods, streams, and water views? Dike Creek Reserve is the place to check out. Starting from the parking area, make your way into the property by following a red blaze access trail that runs along a working farm. The trail then moves into a section of woodlands for a bit. A newly built boardwalk carries you over the wet areas. The trail then comes back to another field, continue ahead going slightly downhill for the length of the field. The trail now enters the woods once again. In a bit you will come to a trail intersection. For this hike, turn left onto the blue blazed trail and follow it to its end. Along the way there is another set of boardwalks and a bridge that crosses a small stream. Turn right onto the white blazed trail and will soon be at a long boardwalk. Near the end of the boardwalk the red trail intersects. Here will eventually want to go left. But first, continue ahead a bit, passing a trail on the right, to a dead end that has a sweeping view of Dike Creek. Retracing your steps take a peek down the red trail now on your left. There is another bridge here that crosses a well worn stream. Retracing your steps once again back to the end of the white blazed trail, turn right onto the red blazed trail. It soon passes through a stone wall winding ever so slightly uphill to another stone wall and a vineyard. From here turn right and follow the yellow blazes back into the woods. The trail makes a loop through the northern part of the property with another spot to view Dikes Creek. After doing the loop retrace your steps back to the red blazed trail. Here continue straight ahead following the perimeter of the vineyard and the end of the red trail. Turn left onto the white blazed trail as it zig zags back to the intersection with the blue trail. Turn right onto the blue trail, then right onto the red and follow it back to the parking area.

Map can be found at: Dike Creek

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Westerly Town Forest – Westerly

There are approximately three miles of trails here at Westerly Town Forest. The property sits on a long descending hill from Laurel Avenue to the banks of the Pawcatuck River. For this 2 mile hike you will follow the entrance trail from the parking area under the power lines to the beginning of the yellow blazed trail. The trail marked occasionally with large granite posts and trail blazes starts its slow descent downhill. After a stone wall, the trail turns to the right and then to the left and continues ahead. You will come across the first of some trail improvements along this stretch with a small new section of boardwalk. At the next intersection turn right to follow the yellow blazed trail. The trail ahead loops back. The trail soon flanks a small stream. Just ahead is another trail intersection. To the right is another new bridge. Continue straight ahead here. The trail narrows a bit, then veers to the right and crosses a stream. Just ahead is another granite post. Here turn left and follow the trail over a section of raised boardwalk, pass a stone wall, and to the banks of the Pawcatuck River. Take a moment here before retracing your steps back to the yellow trail. When you arrive back at the yellow trail turn left. You will begin your long steady climb back up hill. The trail comes to an intersection. If you wanted to add mileage continue straight onto the blue (and eventually red) blazed trails. For this hike turn right continuing to follow the yellow blazes. You will soon turn left again following the yellow blazes along a trail with a stone wall running along it. The yellow blazed trail ends at the power lines. Here turn right onto the trail the weaves through the shrubs under the power lines. This trail soon leads you back to the parking area.

Map can be found at: Westerly Town Forest.

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Boardwalk at Westerly Town Forest

Poquonnock River – Groton

 

Just north of Bluff Point along Depot Road is a half mile boardwalk (one mile out and back) that runs along the Poquonnock River to Poquonnock Road. The boardwalk offers some views of the river itself as it winds behind a residential neighborhood. The boardwalk is a good location for spotting birds as there is quite a bit of brush for them.

 

Map can be found at: Poquonnock River

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Along the Boardwalk

Richmond Heritage Trail – Richmond

  • Richmond Heritage Trail
  • Country Acres Road, Richmond, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°30’10.50″N, 71°39’56.31″W
  • Last Time Hiked: September 22, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.9 miles
  • Fairly easy.

The Richmond Heritage Trail is one of the newest trail systems in the State opening in September of 2017. It comprises of three very distinctive types of walks. The first part is an ADA accessible stone dust path with a beautiful boardwalk. This section is about a half mile long and offers six informational boards about the history and heritage of Richmond. There is a blue blazed trail that meanders to the far reaches of the property. This trail was developed largely in part by Richmond Boy Scout Troop 1. The trail weaves through a forest of pines, beech, and maple trees. A gravel road is also on the property, that for the most part, parallels the blue trail. The back reaches of the gravel road passes fields of tall grasses and wildflowers that is a haven for butterflies and dragonflies. Adding a little of each of these three different walks, one can hike up to 2 miles. The trail-head is at the base of the towns bright blue water tower at the end of Country Acres Road.

Map: Richmond Heritage Trail

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A Stretch of the Boardwalk.

Oakland Beach – Warwick

 

This beach at the tip of a peninsula overlooks Narragansett Bay. From here you see both the Newport Bridge and Jamestown Bridge. Sailboats and cabin cruisers are also a normal sight from here. The beach, and immediate area, is also usually quite busy. There are a few very popular restaurants just by the park and beach as well. One can get just about a mile of walking by following the beach to the extreme eastern edge of the park by the boat ramp, then back following the walking path pass the gazebo through the park, then following the wooden boardwalk and eventually the bike path to its western terminus at Strand Avenue… and then back.

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Boardwalk and Beach

Flat Top Park – West Warwick

 

This small park on the western edge of West Warwick is known mostly for it playground and ball field. There is a small nature trail here as well that is blazed blue. The short quarter mile trail weaves through a thick pine grove and crosses over floodplains via boardwalks. A spur trail takes you to the shores of the Hawkinson Brook, a tributary of the Pawtuxet River.

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Boardwalk at Flat Top Park

Turner Reservoir – East Providence/Seekonk

  • Turner Reservoir
  • Pleasant Street, East Providence, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°49’48.68″N, 71°20’39.48″W
  • First Time Hiked: June 2, 2013
  • Last Time Hiked: September 26, 2021 
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.7 miles
  • Easy.
 
 
 

July 2022 – The Turner Reservoir Loop Trail cannot be completed due to bridge construction. The trails are still open on both sides however. The bridge construction should be complete by the end of the year.

The Turner Reservoir was flooded in the 1930’s and supplied drinking water to the residents of East Providence for several years. Today the reservoir is used for passive recreation. There is also a 2.7 mile loop around the reservoir and Ten Mile River that is mostly a wooded trail, but includes boardwalks and some road walking. There is a parking lot along Pleasant Street opposite Hunts Mills that has an informational board about the trail and its surroundings. Following the dirt trail along the west side of the Ten Mile River you will soon come to a grassy area near the Turner Dam. Continue to follow the grassy shore of the reservoir to a trail the leads into the woods. This section of trail is rather narrow as it follows the shore of the reservoir behind a residential neighborhood before coming to Newman Avenue. Here you turn right (being aware of traffic) and cross the causeway between the Turner Reservoir and Central Pond. Here you cross into Seekonk and then right onto Arcade Avenue. Just north of utility pole 1416 a blue blazed trail into the woods appears. This long stretch of trail follows the shores of the reservoir once again passing behind the Seekonk High School. Along the way there is a side trail that dead ends onto a peninsula that has sweeping views of the reservoir. The wooded trail ends back at the earthen dam where there are some more sweeping views of the reservoir. From here, walk down the hill and the loop continues along a series of boardwalks that wind through the wetlands along the river. The trail then ends at another parking area along Pleasant Street. Turn right and cross the bridge over the Ten Mile River to reach the first parking area.

Trail map can be found at: Turner Reservoir.

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Reservoir Panoramic

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Turner Reservoir/Bridgham Farm Color Map (2017)