Posts Tagged ‘ Lighthouses ’

Squantum Woods – East Providence

  • Squantum Woods
  • Veterans Memorial Parkway, East Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°47’45.49″N, 71°22’16.48″W
  • Last Time Hiked: June 17, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.2 miles
  • Fairly Easy.

 

Once a State Park, now owned by the City of East Providence, Squantum Woods Park has gone through a renaissance over the last couple years and has become a suburban gem. For this walk starting at a parking area off of Veterans Memorial Parkway make your way to the brick walkway at the entrance. Names are inscribed in the bricks of locals who have served in the military. At the end of the walkway is the “Garden of Flags”, a memorial to local Vietnam Veterans. Next walk on the grass toward the tree line and follow the edge of trees toward the back of the park near the back side of the pond. Here you will find a the beginning of a wood chip trail. The trail wraps around the backside of the Kettle Point neighborhood towards the East Bay Bike Path. There are spectacular views of Long Rock Cove below and the Providence River. The shrubs along this stretch are a haven for smaller birds. Yellow warblers, red-winged blackbirds, and finches were observed here at the time of this walk. The trail ends at the bike path. From here you can add as much distance to a walk as you would like. For this walk turn right and follow the bike path a little over a tenth of a mile. On the left there is an “Urban Coastal Greenway – Public Access” sign at a clearing. The clearing leads to a small beach (at low tide) that offers great views of the Port of Providence and the base of the Fuller Rocks Lighthouse (destroyed by an explosion in 1923). From here retrace you steps back to the pond at Squantum Woods and stay to the left of the pond to get to the parking area. Be sure to look for birds in and around the pond. The park also offers picnic benches. Do carry out what you carry in if you so choose to have a picnic before or after your walk.

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A Summer View of Long Rock Cove

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Potowomut Beach – Warwick

 

Often mistaken for East Greenwich, Potowomut, meaning Land of Fires, most famously known for its golf course and Goddard State Park is in fact in Warwick. At the very end of the peninsula lies a very short beach where Narragansett Bay meets Greenwich Bay. Views of Buttonwoods, Oakland Beach, Warwick Neck and its lighthouse, Patience Island, Prudence Island, Hope Island, and Jamestown can be observed from the point.

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Potowomut Beach Looking North

 

Sand Point Light – Portsmouth

  • Sand Point Light
  • Narragansett Avenue, Portsmouth, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°36’22.33″N, 71°18’17.89″W (1 mile from ferry)
  • Last Time Hiked: July 29, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.4 miles
  • Easy.

 

There is a large grassy area on a hill just in front of the lighthouse along Narragansett Avenue. Walking down the hill leads you to a grass mowed path that will lead you to the historic lighthouse and beach area. The lighthouse, the oldest existing in Rhode Island, was built in Newport in 1823 and moved to Prudence Island in 1851 where it has since stood. Its green beacon can be seen throughout the East Passage and from the mainland from Bristol to Middletown. The lighthouse itself withstood the historic hurricanes of 1938 and 1954, but the keepers house was swept out to sea during the 1938 storm killing five people. Making your way out to the actual point you will get a sweeping view of the East Passage including both the Newport Bridge and Mount Hope Bridge. On clear days you see up Mount Hope Bay to Fall River and the Braga Bridge. The Hog Island Light is also visible from here. Continuing to the Town Dock onto Landing Lane and then right onto Narragansett Avenue will conclude this short walk.

 

NOTE: If you plan on hiking on Prudence Island, be known that the island is not commercialized. There are no restaurants, lodging, or transportation services. There are no public restrooms on the island except a composting toilet by the T-Wharf at the southern end of the island, which is several miles from most hikes. Once you are off the ferry you are on your own. Bring everything you will need for a day hike with no services. Furthermore, ticks are in abundance on the island. It is necessary to take precautions including proper clothing, sprays, and frequent checks.

 

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Sand Point Light With The Mount Hope Bridge In The Distance

Prudence North – Portsmouth

  • Prudence North
  • Neck Farm Road, Portsmouth, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°38’30.76″N, 71°20’44.46″W (3 miles from ferry)
  • Last Time Hiked: July 28, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 4.2 miles
  • Fairly easy.

 

Just north from the famed abandoned Garland Mansion is the trail head to the Providence Point Trail. There is a small area on the right just before the gate to park a vehicle. The trail and subsequent beach walk to Providence Point, the northern most point on the island is just a little over two miles long. If you were to also add the side trails to this hike the mileage in total would increase to about six miles. The land here at the northern end of the island is part of the Narragansett Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve. Starting from the gate and heading north you will immediately find yourself on an old road that is covered with grass in most areas. The road is mowed often enough, but stay out of the areas of taller grass. Birds and berries are abundant here, especially the familiar call of the catbird. Black raspberry, wine berry, and bayberry are all along this 2 mile stretch. At the first intersection there are signs for Long Point Trail and Schoolhouse Trail. Long Point trail to the left would lead you at to the peninsula between Coogeshall Cove and Sheep Pen Cove. The Schoolhouse Trail to the right would lead you to Potters Cove. For this hike continue straight. On the right in the dense shrubs are the remains of an old schoolhouse. Soon you will see Coogeshall Cove on the left and its large marsh. Keep an eye out for egrets here. Beyond the cove you will catch a glimpse of Patience Island. Beyond the cove there are some unmarked trails that intersect the main trail, continue ahead and the trail starts to climb uphill before coming to the next intersection with signs. On the left is the Postal Ferry Trail that would lead you to the narrow channel between Prudence and Patience Islands. On the right is the Bear Point Trail that leads you to the East Passage just north of Bear Point. The intersection is the site of the North End Farm, long abandoned. All that remains are several cellar holes with an occasional interpretive sign. There was a barn, a house, and several other smaller buildings here, and the area with a lack of trees was the farm. Again be aware of the tall grass here. Continuing ahead along the Providence Point Trail you will pass some more shrubs and trees such as honeysuckle and crabapples. You will also pass a large stone wall on the right. At the end of the trail a narrow path leads you to the seashell beach strewed with sea lavender. Staying to your left will lead you to the point. From this perspective you can see the Warwick Neck Light, the Aldrich Mansion, Rocky Point, Conimicut Light, Colt State Park, and the Providence skyline eleven miles away. From here turn around and retrace your steps back to the parking area. To add extra mileage to the hike explore to side trails. This area tends to be very buggy particularly in the summer. It is advised to wear mosquito netting for this hike. Also ticks are very prevalent in this area. Be sure to check for them quite thoroughly, stay on the trails and out of the tall grass.

 

NOTE: If you plan on hiking on Prudence Island, be known that the island is not commercialized. There are no restaurants, lodging, or transportation services. There are no public restrooms on the island except a composting toilet by the T-Wharf at the southern end of the island, which is several miles from most hikes. Once you are off the ferry you are on your own. Bring everything you will need for a day hike with no services. Furthermore, ticks are in abundance on the island. It is necessary to take precautions including proper clothing, sprays, and frequent checks.

 

 

Map can be found at: Prudence North

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The Beach to Providence Point

Blue Beach – North Kingstown

  • Blue Beach
  • Circuit Drive, North Kingstown, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°35’12.85″N, 71°25’51.92″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 16, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.6 miles
  • Fairly easy beach walk.

 

Blue Beach is well hidden among the industrial complex of Quonset Point. The stone dust path leads from a small parking area to the beach that faces south on Narragansett Bay. From the beach you see the Jamestown Bridge in the distance. There is a brook that breaks the beach at times making the walk rather short. From this beach to the southwest you can catch a glimpse of the Poplar Point Light about a mile away.

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Blue Beach on a Winter Afternoon

Point Judith – Narragansett

  • Point Judith – Camp Cronin
  • Ocean Road, Narragansett, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°21’44.47″N, 71°29’8.45″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 22, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Rocky beach walk, otherwise easy.

 

Part of the South Shore Management Area on the western tip of Point Judith, this little spot known as Camp Cronin offers a few different terrains. There is a small walkway, by the Point Judith Fishermen’s Memorial, that leads up to a hill that offers a general view of the surrounding area. Then on each side of the breakwater are small beaches. The one to the east, exposed to the ocean, is very rocky and only suitable for walking during lower tides. The beach to the west, inside the safe harbor, is small and sandy. Exploring a little of each will give you a stroll of up to a half mile. The view of the Point Judith Lighthouse is phenomenal here. You are likely to find photographers, fishermen, and beach-goers here on most days.

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Point Judith Lighthouse

 

Pic-Wil Nature Preserve- Barrington

  • Pic-Wil (Picerelli-Wilson) Nature Preserve
  • Barrington, RI
  • Trailhead: Undisclosed
  • Last Time Hiked: June 25, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.8 miles
  • Easy.

 

Mr. Ray Marr of the Barrington Land Conservation Trust and an avid lover of purple martins gave a public tour today of this property in Barrington. The Pic-Wil Nature Preserve, named after the former land owners Picerelli and Wilson, became a Barrington Land Conservation Trust property in 1987. The property was once the home to a bottling factory known as Deep Rock Water Company. Today, the property has three large meadows,  a small forest and a salt marsh on the upper reaches of Narragansett Bay. This property is a haven for birds. In fact it is known for its purple martins as they nest and resort here in the late spring and into the summer. The purple martin is a type of swallow, and here at Pic-Wil they reside in one of several gourd rack nests. At the time of this hike there were 53 nesting purple martins and over 100 in total. There are several bird boxes here as well as there is an attempt to attract the Eastern Bluebird. House wrens, hawks, and ospreys were also spotted here. The property has been home to deer, coyote, fox, weasels, squirrels, chipmunks, and rabbits as well. The small network of trails here lead you through the fields, the forest, and into the salt marsh. There is an active bee hive here on the property as part of a local pollination project. From the property you can see the Conimicut Lighthouse and across the bay to Warwick, North Kingstown, and Prudence Island. The property is not open to the public except when guided tours are offered. The tours are usually posted on their website or Facebook page. For more information contact the Barrington Land Conservation Trust.

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Summer Meadow (Note the gourd rack nest)

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