Posts Tagged ‘ Meadows ’

Middletown Valley – Middletown

 

Middletown Valley is a long a narrow strip of land just off of High Street that offers a little over a mile of walking trails. The stone and gravel trails wind through areas of grass and meadows and are marked yellow, red, and blue. There have been hundreds of trees planted on the property as well. Parking is available at the north end of the property at O’Neil Boulevard. There is also an informational board here with rules and a trail map.

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Walking Trail at Middletown Valley

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Westport Town Farm – Westport

 

This beautiful property owned and maintained by the Trustees and the Westport Land Conservation Trust offers a nice 1 mile walk along mowed trails following the perimeter of a large meadow. The property stretches downhill from the farmhouse and barn to the Westport River. There are several stone walls and wildflowers here at Westport Farm as well.

 

Map can be found at: Westport Town Farm

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Stone Walls and Mowed Paths

Pine Hill Point – Portsmouth

  • Pine Hill Point
  • Neck Farm Road, Portsmouth, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°38’11.54″N, 71°20’18.77″W (2.5 miles from ferry)
  • Last Time Hiked: July 30, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.4 miles
  • Fairly easy.

 

This is a beautiful network of grass mowed fields that lead you to the bay. Starting from a small parking area along Neck Farm Road you will follow the Pine Hill Trail south for about a tenth of a mile. Turn right at the first intersection and follow the trail slightly uphill. The trail here is flanked by trees and overgrown fields full of wildflowers and buzzing insects. The trail soon turns to the left passing through a fairly large meadow. At the next intersection continue straight and you will soon be turning to the left again onto a trail aptly named Seaside Way. You will catch glimpses of the bay through the trees here. When you reach the Pine Hill Trail continue straight and the trail will lead you downhill to Jenny’s Pond on the left and the beach on the right. From the beach you have views of the Jamestown Bridge and the Newport Bridge as well as Quonset. In Jenny’s Pond you are likely to see seabirds including egrets. From here retrace your steps to the Pine Hill Trail, turn right and follow it back to the parking area.

 

NOTE: If you plan on hiking on Prudence Island, be known that the island is not commercialized. There are no restaurants, lodging, or transportation services. There are no public restrooms on the island except a composting toilet by the T-Wharf at the southern end of the island, which is several miles from most hikes. Once you are off the ferry you are on your own. Bring everything you will need for a day hike with no services. Furthermore, ticks are in abundance on the island. It is necessary to take precautions including proper clothing, sprays, and frequent checks.

 

 

Trail map can be found at: Pine Hill Point.

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Trail at Pine Hill Point

Cormier Woods – Uxbridge

  • Cormier Woods
  • Chapin Street, Uxbridge, MA
  • Trailhead:  42° 4’10.60″N, 71°35’41.86″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 15, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.6 miles
  • Fairly easy, some moderate hills.

 

There are several miles of trails here at Cormier Woods and the abutting properties. This hike focused on the main trails of Cormier Woods, which in themselves offer an abundance of solitude. Starting from the parking lot by the barn we first crossed the street and made our way to the red trail. At the intersection for the loop we turned left and followed the red trail clockwise first making our way through a narrow fern flanked path before passing a private residence and open field. The trail then winds back into the woods as it heads away from roads and residences. The further into the woods the quieter it would get. The red trail turns to the right as it approaches a swamp on the left and then winds through the western edges of the property coming to a boulder field. At the next intersection stay to the left and follow the blue trail downhill. It turns to the right a couple times and then climbs up a graded trail that looks as if it was once used as a cartpath or railway. At the top of the hill, just after a massive boulder, are a couple cellar holes of the Jonathon White Homestead. Continuing along the blue trail we soon came back to the red trail where we turned left and followed it clockwise steadily uphill for a bit. The trail winds passing ledges and several stone walls before coming to the first intersection. Turning left here returns you to the parking lot. From the parking lot we followed the yellow blazed trail clockwise as well. First through a meadow, then back into the woods. The white blazed trail on the left leads to several more miles of trails at Meadow Brook Woods and furthermore connects to the Mendon Town Forest. For this hike we kept it simple and continued along the yellow trail leading to a blueberry patch that was in bloom (and they were delicious). The trail turns to the right and leads towards the barn and back to the parking area. Hunting is allowed here, so blaze orange is required during hunting season. Deer, coyote, and fisher cat have been observed here as well.

 

Map can be found at: Cormier Woods

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Passing The Boulder Field

Weetamoo Woods East – Tiverton

  • Weetamoo Woods East
  • Lake Road, Tiverton, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°35’14.25″N, 71° 9’45.37″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 9, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.1 miles
  • Fairly easy with some rocky footing.

 

Weetamoo Woods in its entirety is easily one of the best places in Rhode Island to hike. The last time I hiked Weetamoo I did about five and a half miles of trails that are described in a Ken Weber book. For this hike I opted to explore the remaining trails in the eastern end of the preserve. Starting from a small parking area on Lake Road, myself and a couple friends first followed the red blazed trail into the property. The trail is quite rocky in areas and footing can be a little challenging. Take your time here if the rocks are wet. Soon we came to a four way intersection (Waypoint 5). The red blazed trail intersects with a blue blazed and orange blazed trail, both on the left. Here we turned onto the orange trail and soon stumbled upon a cellar hole on the right. The trail passes a few stone walls and traverse through an area of beech and hollies. We then turned right onto the Meadow Trail (marked with a sign/Waypoint 6). This trail first crosses a gas easement and winds through the woods before coming to a large meadow. The trail continues with the meadow to the left and a long stone wall to the right. At the far end of the meadow you will catch your first glimpse of Borden Brook below on the right. The Meadow Trail ends at the yellow blazed trail where we turned right. This trail first crosses over Borden Brook and then follows an old cart path for a bit before turning right in the woods. Be sure to keep an eye for the yellow blazes for the turn as the cart path continues straight ahead. There are a few trail intersections here. Continue pass the blue blazes and then follow the red blazes. Soon you will come to Borden Brook again. Here you will find some rather impressive stone work. First, are the remains of an old sawmill complete with large stone walls. Second, step off the trail and follow the brook a few steps down stream to few the craftsmanship of the stone arch bridge. From the sawmill site you could either follow the red or blue blazed trail to the east as they both lead to the same trail intersection ahead. We opted to stay to the left and follow the red blazed trail as it climbed steadily uphill before crossing the gas easement once again. Shortly after way came back to Waypoint 5. From here we retraced our steps back along the red blazed trail to the parking area.

 

Map can be found at: Weetamoo Woods East.

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Along The Orange Blazed Trail

Pic-Wil Nature Preserve- Barrington

  • Pic-Wil (Picerelli-Wilson) Nature Preserve
  • Barrington, RI
  • Trailhead: Undisclosed
  • Last Time Hiked: June 25, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.8 miles
  • Easy.

 

Mr. Ray Marr of the Barrington Land Conservation Trust and an avid lover of purple martins gave a public tour today of this property in Barrington. The Pic-Wil Nature Preserve, named after the former land owners Picerelli and Wilson, became a Barrington Land Conservation Trust property in 1987. The property was once the home to a bottling factory known as Deep Rock Water Company. Today, the property has three large meadows,  a small forest and a salt marsh on the upper reaches of Narragansett Bay. This property is a haven for birds. In fact it is known for its purple martins as they nest and resort here in the late spring and into the summer. The purple martin is a type of swallow, and here at Pic-Wil they reside in one of several gourd rack nests. At the time of this hike there were 53 nesting purple martins and over 100 in total. There are several bird boxes here as well as there is an attempt to attract the Eastern Bluebird. House wrens, hawks, and ospreys were also spotted here. The property has been home to deer, coyote, fox, weasels, squirrels, chipmunks, and rabbits as well. The small network of trails here lead you through the fields, the forest, and into the salt marsh. There is an active bee hive here on the property as part of a local pollination project. From the property you can see the Conimicut Lighthouse and across the bay to Warwick, North Kingstown, and Prudence Island. The property is not open to the public except when guided tours are offered. The tours are usually posted on their website or Facebook page. For more information contact the Barrington Land Conservation Trust.

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Summer Meadow (Note the gourd rack nest)

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