Posts Tagged ‘ Narragansett Bay ’

Head’s Beach – Jamestown

  • Head’s Beach
  • Seaside Drive, Jamestown, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°32’16.05″N, 71°23’8.09″W
  • Last Time Hiked: September 7, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.3 miles
  • Easy beach walk.

 

Head’s Beach is a small town owned beach on the west side of Jamestown with sweeping views that include the Jamestown Bridge, Plum Island Light, and Quonset Point. This walk is very short, just over a quarter mile, but the beach itself is serene. Parking is limited to residents from May 15th to October 15th.

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The Jamestown Bridge From Head’s Beach

Allins Cove – Barrington

 

Allin’s Cove in Barrington offers a short trail and short beach walk (only at low tide). The property is protected by the Barrington Land Trust and open to the public. The trail is flanked by shrubs and wetlands, being a haven for birds. The cove is separated from Narragansett Bay by a beach peninsula. The cove itself is fed by the Annawomscutt Brook which starts in East Providence and runs southerly through western Barrington. Before visiting check the tide charts or your walk will be shorter than expected.

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Looking North at Allin’s Cove.

Tourister Mill Riverfront Walkway- Warren

  • Tourister Mill Riverfront Walkway
  • North Main Street, Warren, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°44’13.01″N, 71°17’14.10″W
  • Last Time Hiked: September 2, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Easy.

 

The newly renovated Tourister Mill complex in Warren offers a public walkway along the lower Palmer River. Starting from the designated public parking area at the north end of the complex, the walkway winds along the rivers edge in a southerly direction with views of where the Palmer and Barrington Rivers converge into the Warren River on one side and the historic mill buildings on the other. The end section of the walkway at the time of this walk was blocked off and still under construction.

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The Walkway at Tourister Mill.

Pheasant Hill Beach – Portsmouth

 

At the end of Pheasant Road just after the railroad tracks and to the right is a parking area for Pheasant Hill Beach. From here you can follow the road a few hundred feet to the walking path the follows the shoreline toward the Mount Hope Bridge. At the end of the path there is a narrow trail that continues ahead. Along this trail are sweeping and stunning views of a marsh to your right, the bridge ahead, and Hog Island Lighthouse to your left. At the end of the trail are a row of boulders. From here turn left and make your way to the beach. From here you can follow the beach back a bit to one of the access points back to the walking path that leads back to the parking area.

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Walking Path With Mount Hope Bridge In The Distance.

Rail Explorers Northern Ramble – Portsmouth

  • Rail Explorers – Northern Ramble
  • Alexander Road, Portsmouth, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°35’5.76″N, 71°16’58.32″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 14, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 5.3 miles
  • Easy.

 

Not a hike, Not a walk… a different type of Rails to Trails! While most of the former railroads in Rhode Island have been converted from rails to trails by the means of bike paths, this former section of the Old Colony Railroad has been creatively reinvented. No walking and bicycle riding on this “trail”. A pedal powered rail vehicle, simple to operate, is the means of exercise and exploration. The tracks here date back to 1864 and were used until 1980. They remained unused until the spring of 2017 when “Rail Explorers” opened for business. There are two main options to choose from, the Southern Circuit which is a 3 mile out and back ride, or the Northern Ramble, which is a 5.4 mile one way ride. Today, we took the later, starting at the Portsmouth Grove Station on Alexander Road in Melville. The route passes Melville Ponds Recreation Area, the Green Animals Topiary Gardens, and the Portsmouth Abbey School all to the right. Along this stretch and to the left you will have sweeping views of Narragansett Bay, Prudence Island, and (on a clear day) spot Downtown Providence in the distance. Continuing the route passes over the historical “Bloody Brook” (Barker Brook), through a golf course, by the tower at Carnegie Abbey, before catching a glimpse of the Hog Island Light to the left. From here you will pass under the Mount Hope Bridge, by Bristol Ferry Landing (just after the bridge to the left), and then pass over a significant channel called Founders Brook. The land on each side is part of the Town Pond/Bertha Russell Preserve. Across the bay is a significant hill. This is Mount Hope where King Phillips Chair is located. The last part of the route pushes eastward through the Montaup Country Club before coming to its terminus at the Hummocks Station. From here it is a bus ride back to Portsmouth Grove. This route is also offered in reverse at different times of the day. The rail vehicles are available in two or four seats.

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Northern Ramble by the Mount Hope Bridge

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From the Rail Explorers Website (https://www.railexplorers.net/)

Taylor Point – Jamestown

  • Taylor Point
  • Freebody Drive, Jamestown, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°30’34.63″N, 71°21’35.30″W
  • Last Time Hiked: June 23, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.2 miles
  • Easy, be careful near the edges.

 

Taylor Point is a work in progress and offers some great views of Narragansett Bay. The Taylor Point Restoration Association has been improving shoreline access and trails on the property. Some of the trails are narrow and others are wide and well mowed. Others have not been developed yet. There is two parking areas and public restroom. The rocks and edges can be clustered with fishermen. Do exercise caution along the edges. A hike just over a mile was done by doing several “anticipated” (see trail map) “in and out” trails and the roads that connect them.

 

Map can be found at: Taylor Point.

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The Iconic Newport Bridge From Taylor Point.

Squantum Woods – East Providence

  • Squantum Woods
  • Veterans Memorial Parkway, East Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°47’45.49″N, 71°22’16.48″W
  • Last Time Hiked: June 17, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.2 miles
  • Fairly Easy.

 

Once a State Park, now owned by the City of East Providence, Squantum Woods Park has gone through a renaissance over the last couple years and has become a suburban gem. For this walk starting at a parking area off of Veterans Memorial Parkway make your way to the brick walkway at the entrance. Names are inscribed in the bricks of locals who have served in the military. At the end of the walkway is the “Garden of Flags”, a memorial to local Vietnam Veterans. Next walk on the grass toward the tree line and follow the edge of trees toward the back of the park near the back side of the pond. Here you will find a the beginning of a wood chip trail. The trail wraps around the backside of the Kettle Point neighborhood towards the East Bay Bike Path. There are spectacular views of Long Rock Cove below and the Providence River. The shrubs along this stretch are a haven for smaller birds. Yellow warblers, red-winged blackbirds, and finches were observed here at the time of this walk. The trail ends at the bike path. From here you can add as much distance to a walk as you would like. For this walk turn right and follow the bike path a little over a tenth of a mile. On the left there is an “Urban Coastal Greenway – Public Access” sign at a clearing. The clearing leads to a small beach (at low tide) that offers great views of the Port of Providence and the base of the Fuller Rocks Lighthouse (destroyed by an explosion in 1923). From here retrace you steps back to the pond at Squantum Woods and stay to the left of the pond to get to the parking area. Be sure to look for birds in and around the pond. The park also offers picnic benches. Do carry out what you carry in if you so choose to have a picnic before or after your walk.

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A Summer View of Long Rock Cove