Posts Tagged ‘ Ponds ’

Squantum Woods – East Providence

  • Squantum Woods
  • Veterans Memorial Parkway, East Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°47’45.49″N, 71°22’16.48″W
  • Last Time Hiked: June 17, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.2 miles
  • Fairly Easy.

 

Once a State Park, now owned by the City of East Providence, Squantum Woods Park has gone through a renaissance over the last couple years and has become a suburban gem. For this walk starting at a parking area off of Veterans Memorial Parkway make your way to the brick walkway at the entrance. Names are inscribed in the bricks of locals who have served in the military. At the end of the walkway is the “Garden of Flags”, a memorial to local Vietnam Veterans. Next walk on the grass toward the tree line and follow the edge of trees toward the back of the park near the back side of the pond. Here you will find a the beginning of a wood chip trail. The trail wraps around the backside of the Kettle Point neighborhood towards the East Bay Bike Path. There are spectacular views of Long Rock Cove below and the Providence River. The shrubs along this stretch are a haven for smaller birds. Yellow warblers, red-winged blackbirds, and finches were observed here at the time of this walk. The trail ends at the bike path. From here you can add as much distance to a walk as you would like. For this walk turn right and follow the bike path a little over a tenth of a mile. On the left there is an “Urban Coastal Greenway – Public Access” sign at a clearing. The clearing leads to a small beach (at low tide) that offers great views of the Port of Providence and the base of the Fuller Rocks Lighthouse (destroyed by an explosion in 1923). From here retrace you steps back to the pond at Squantum Woods and stay to the left of the pond to get to the parking area. Be sure to look for birds in and around the pond. The park also offers picnic benches. Do carry out what you carry in if you so choose to have a picnic before or after your walk.

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A Summer View of Long Rock Cove

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Bluff To Bluff Trail – Providence

  • Bluff To Bluff Trail – Roger Williams Park
  • F.C. Greene Memorial Boulevard, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°47’12.91″N, 71°24’49.34″W
  • Last Time Hiked: June 2, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.0 miles
  • Fairly easy with some slight elevation.

 

The aptly named Bluff To Bluff Trail spans from the Natural History Museum to the Casino and includes the valley below. The red blazed walking path, almost entirely of paved or concrete walkways, winds downhill from across the Natural History Museum toward Willow Lake. After crossing the street at the Seal House, the trail follows Roosevelt Lake for a bit before climbing uphill and then it continues to the left crossing the Lovers Retreat Bridge before coming to the Casino. The trail then loops back to the Lovers Retreat Bridge and veers to the left to the Betsey Williams Cottage. After the cottage the trail winds to the right and downhill crossing the street and then follows the shore of Polo Lake. After crossing the street once again the trail meanders uphill and loops opposite the Roger Williams Park Zoo entrance. This section includes a short section of grass that follows the edge of the road. The remainder of the trail will bring you back to the opposite of the road from the Natural History Museum. Be sure to take your time enjoying the views of the lakes. They are havens for birds.

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Mountain Laurel Blooming Along The Bluff To Bluff Trail

Massasoit South – Taunton

  • Massasoit State Park South
  • Bearhole Road, Taunton, MA
  • Trailhead:  41°51’56.43″N, 70°59’15.91″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 21, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.6 miles
  • Fairly easy with some slight elevation.

 

I had come out to Massasoit State Park to start hiking the system of blazed trails. I was prepared to do the blue loop trail at the southern end of the park when I stumbled upon a major obstacle. Sections of the blue loop were closed due to construction. Already committed to a good portion of the loop I backtracked and did the remainder of the open loop before exploring a few of the side trails in the southwestern part of the park. I was informed by a member of the construction crew that the trail would likely be re-opened in a month or so. Nonetheless, the trails that I did explore were rather quiet covered in pine needles and led to several of the parks ponds. The park itself is quite stunning and well maintained and offers a seasonal campground as well. I will be back in the summer to update this blog.

 

Map can be found at: Massasoit South

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Big Bearhole Pond

Woonasquatucket River Bike Path – Providence/Johnston

  • Fred Lippett Woonasquatucket River Greenway Bike Path
  • Allepo Street, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°49’11.31″N, 71°26’52.80″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 11, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 4.8 miles
  • Easy.

 

Since the 1990’s the Onleyville section of Providence has been going through a revitalization and part of it has been the development of the Greenway. Merino Park, Donigian Park, and the most recently Riverside Park have been refurbished and reopened. The highlight of the Greenway is the 2.4 mile bike path from the outskirts of Onleyville, through Manton, and into Johnston. Starting at Allepo Street at Riverside Park in the shadows of the iconic Onleyville towers of the Atlantic Mills, the bike winds along side the river and through the park. Here is a community garden, a dam and waterfall, and a bike shop. The bike path then slowly climbs uphill meeting with the pedestrian bridge that leads to Merino Park. The bike then winds down hill and follows the bustling Route 6 for a bit passing the bike paths famous mural. The river at this point crosses under the highway.  The bike then starts to pull away from the highway and the river rejoins on the left just before passing under Glenbridge Avenue. From here on the bike path becomes much quieter as it pulls away from the city. Soon on the right is the Manton Gateway, a section of bike path that leads to the Manton neighborhood. There is also a skate park along that stretch. Continuing ahead the bike path crosses over the river. You are now entering Johnston. The Button Hole Golf Course is now on the left and the river is to the right. Just ahead is an access path to Hedley Avenue. Continuing ahead the bike path follows the river to Greenville Avenue. Use caution crossing here as this is a very busy street. After the crossing the bike path continues a little over a half mile to its terminus at Lyman Avenue. Along the way at the Goldsmith Street crossing take a peek at Manton Pond and its fish ladder by following Goldsmith north a few feet and then turning right following the path to the dam. After reaching the end of the bike path retrace your steps back to Onleyville for a roundtrip walk of nearly 5 miles.

 

Map can be found at: Woonasquatucket River Bike Path

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The Bike Path Crossing the Woonasquatucket River at the Providence/Johnston Border.

Highland Park – Attleboro

 

A former country club, purchased by the City of Attleboro last year, is now open to the public as a city park. The entrance on Mechanic Street has a sign with rules stating dogs must be leashed and ironically (and somewhat comical) “No Golf”. There are several sections of former golf cart paths that are paved. The property offers several species of trees that are scattered among the rolling hills. There are two small ponds and a short stream offering a haven for birds. Without any doubt this park is going to become a favorite among locals looking for a walk.

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Path By A Pond

Whitehall Park – Ledyard

  • Whitehall Park
  • Shewville Road, Ledyard, CT
  • Trailhead:  41°28’46.28″N, 71°59’29.72″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 17, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.9 miles
  • Fairly easy with some significant elevation.

 

This small property in northern Ledyard offers quite a punch. A blue blazed loop trail leads you over a small wooden bridge that crosses old stone work before snaking between two small ponds. The trail then starts uphill and turns left. Look for the stone throne here. It is a large natural “chair” that overlooks the property. Continuing along the trail and uphill along a set of power lines brings you close to the highest parts of the property. The trail then turns to the right slightly running along a barbed wire fence. At the end of the trail turn left (right to exit) and follow this trail to its end. Here you will come to a high ledge. Be careful near the edges. Retrace you steps back to the last intersection and continue straight the remainder of the way to the parking area.

 

Map can be found at: Whitehall Park

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One of the Ponds at Whitehall Park

Roosevelt Lake – Providence

  • Roosevelt Lake Trail – Roger Williams Park
  • Cladrastis Avenue, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°46’59.22″N, 71°24’53.69″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 17, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.8 miles
  • Easy.

 

Starting from the parking lot of the Carousel Village follow the blue blazes toward the pond. This trail, all on concrete and asphalt walks, follows the shore of Roosevelt lake passing the Williams Family Cemetery, the Bandstand, the Casino, the Seal House, and the Japanese Garden. A stroll through the Japanese Garden adds a little more distance to the posted 0.57 miles.

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The Bandstand and Casino Along Roosevelt Lake

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