Posts Tagged ‘ Reservoirs ’

Copicut Reservoir – Fall River

 

This is a very short walk on a peninsula that is just under a half mile in total. This location, used mostly by fishermen, offers a short trail that reaches to the end of the peninsula. The views of the reservoir are spectacular and makes it well worth the stop if in the area. Be on the look out for several types of birds here that visit the reservoir.

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A Thawing Copicut Reservoir

Lane Homestead – Foxboro

  • Lane Homestead
  • Laprelot Road, Foxboro, MA
  • Trailhead:  42° 5’8.04″N, 71°15’21.22″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 18, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.2 miles
  • Easy.          

 

On the west side of the Neponset Reservoir lies system of trails. From the second parking area past the Learning Center and adjacent park is the beginning of the “Storybook Trail”. This trail, short in itself, is a good trail for young children venturing out into the woods. Following this trail there are several posts with a page from a children’s book. There are over 20 pages to read following the trail counter-clockwise. After passing two pillars and following the trail downhill, the Storybook Trail turns to the left. Take a break from the story for a moment and continue straight passing a shed like structure along the reservoir. Turn to the left after the structure. There are two dead end trails to follow here that each lead to points with sweeping views of the reservoir. From here retrace your steps back past the structure and turn right back onto the Storybook Trail. This stretch is also part of the 33 mile Warner Trail. Continue to follow the posts. Soon you will turn left, stay to the left when you reach a grassy area with an abandoned garage. The trail continues back into the woods. At the next intersection turn right and retrace your steps back to the parking area. Keep in mind that the parking lots are closed here when there are events at nearby Gillette Stadium.

 

Map can be found at: Lane Homestead

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Along The Neponset Reservoir

Easton Pond – Newport

 

Known mostly by locals, is a short stone dust path atop a portion of the levees of Easton Pond. The path follows most of the western edge and part of the northern edge of the pond. There are two entrances to the walking path. One is on Old Beach Road, but parking is not really an option here. The second entrance is at a parking lot for the Newport Little League field on Ellery Road. From the walking path looking south you can see over Memorial Boulevard and First Beach to the Atlantic Ocean. Keep in mind that only the stone dust path is open to the public. The remainder of the levees are off limits. You could add additional mileage to this walk by following Old Beach Road south to Memorial Boulevard and then continuing along the Cliff Walk.

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Walking Path Along Easton Pond

~~This walk is dedicated to a friend who recently experienced a tragic loss. You are in all of our thoughts my friend. Hang in there.~~

Stump Pond – Smithfield

 

Stump Pond is known mostly to be a fishing spot. The state owned property however has a short out and back trail that follows the shore of the pond. Starting from the parking area, you can first walk along the dam to the left to catch a sweeping view of the pond. At the end of the walkway is the spillway where Stump Pond (also called Stillwater Reservoir) flows into the Woonasquatucket River. From here retrace your steps and continue to follow the dam towards the woods. A well defined trail then follows the shore winding gently up and down small hills. The trail comes to a small peninsula where there is a cluster of trees leaning over the ponds edge. A trail ahead continues onto private property. For this hike, stop at the small peninsula and enjoy the view before returning back to the parking area.

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A wintry Stump Pond.

Sprague Hill – Glocester

  • Sprague Hill
  • Putnam Pike, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°55’15.19″N, 71°44’17.69″W
  • Last Time Hiked: October 28, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.7 miles
  • Moderate, areas can be difficult due to weather.

This three and a half mile hike explores the lesser traveled paths of two well known hiking destinations and a connecting road between them that crosses over Sprague Hill. Starting at a parking area along Putnam Pike for the Durfee Hill Management Area follow the dirt road beyond the gate. The road winds south before first coming to an area on the left with a small waterfall and some old stone work along Brandy Brook. Continuing ahead the road turns to the right. The trail to the left you will return on. At the next split the follow the road to the left and it will come to Burlingame Reservoir. There are some blazes and marks in this area presumably used by cyclists, ignore them for this hike. Next you will cross the earthen dam of the reservoir. The view of is quite nice here. The next part of this hike can be quite difficult after some rain. The unmarked but relatively defined trail turns away from the reservoir. It is a very rocky trail and after some rain can be quite wet and somewhat flooded. Take your time here and be sure to follow the trail. It soon comes to an intersection. Take a good look around and familiarize yourself with the intersection. You will be returning to this point but following a different trail out. At this point turn right and follow the trail to the southwest. This trail is actually Elbow Rock Road and it is fairly narrow, channeled in areas, and travels gradually up Sprague Hill for about a half mile. Much like the previous trail, it is quite rocky and areas and will be wet, almost stream like, after significant precipitation. The trail is also flanked by areas of mountain laurel and hemlocks. Do note that there are “No Trespassing” signs on each side of the trail after you leave the Durfee Hill Management Area. The trail itself lies within a public right of way. Be sure to stay on this trail ignoring other trails that spur off in either direction until you reach the top of the hill at a four way trail intersection with a parking area. The trail to the left is actually the end of Sprague Hill Road and the lesser known small parking area is public parking for Sprague Farm. For this hike continue straight and follow the dirt road slightly downhill. You may notice white dot blazes here. This is part of the Sprague Farm trail network. Soon on the right you will find a narrow unmarked trail that crosses over a large section of outcrop. Turn here and follow the trail that climbs the hill. This is Elbow Rock. There are no sweeping views here but be aware of the edges. The rock is rather large and looms high above the surrounding forest. From here follow the trail over the rock and to the left back down to Elbow Rock Road. Turn left and retrace your steps back up and over Sprague Hill a little over a mile to the intersection that you had familiarized yourself with. From here follow the trail mostly straight, along the main trail, as it winds to the pond. There is a large field to the right if you choose to explore it. Next the trail comes to another earthen dam and a smaller pond on the left. After heavy rains this is also a challenge as an area of the dam is slightly compromised and water flows over it into Brandy Brook. Next there is a small bridge that crosses a stonework channel. Turn right and retrace your steps back to the parking area. Hunting is allowed in these areas, be sure to wear orange during hunting season.

Trail maps can be found at: Sprague Hill

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Burlingame Reservoir

Scotstun Town Forest – Glocester

  • Scotstun Town Forest
  • Chopmist Hill Road, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°53’52.80″N, 71°40’10.36″W
  • Last Time Hiked: October 21, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Fairly easy.

 

This property lies on the east shore of Smith and Sayles Reservoir. There is a short quarter mile trail that leads to the shore of the reservoir from Chopmist Hill Road. The trail head is just about opposite Hemlock Road next to utility pole number 124. The trail head is not by the sign a little further up the road, if you are not looking for it you will miss it. The trail winds through the woods canopy of pine, hemlock, and beech trees among others. The trail is not blazed but is definable enough to follow and dead ends at the reservoir. According to the trail map (which can be obtained at Glocester Town Hall) there are plans to add future trails.

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Smith And Sayles Reservoir

White Mill Park – Burrillville

 

This small town park sits on the site of a former mill. In fact two mills. The first occupied this location from 1834 to 1892 when it burnt down. A second mill was built and was here until the 1970’s. Today the property features the old dam with its waterfall that creates a small reflective reservoir. A pedestrian footbridge crosses the Clear River to the wooded portion of the property. There are a handful of trails beyond the bridge. There is also a playground here.

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The Bridge At White Mill Park

 

Quaddick State Park – Thompson

  • Quaddick State Park
  • Quaddick Town Farm Road, Thompson, CT
  • Trailhead: 41°57’21.27″N, 71°48’43.11″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 2, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.6 miles
  • Easy with some elevation.

 

Just over the border in Connecticut is a quaint and small State Park used mostly for swimming. There is also a mile and a half red blazed loop trail that traverses throughout the park. It is a well blazed trail that gently climbs up and down rolling hills, follows the shore of the Quaddick Reservoir for a moment, and passes by Poor Farm Brook. There are many stone walls through the fern covered forest of towering pines. There are also many birds that could be heard here.

 

Trail maps can be found at: Quaddick State Park

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Stone Walls And Tall Pines

Luther Reservoir – Attleboro

  • Luther Reservoir
  • Todd Drive, Attleboro, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°56’12.21″N, 71°20’0.51″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 13, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.6 miles
  • Fairly easy, some hills.

A nice little gem tucked away just north of Route 123 that features a small reservoir with a dam and waterfall as well as the Seven Mile River. There is a small spot to park at the end of Todd Drive. Be sure not to block the gate or nearby driveways. A trail leads through a good portion of the property south of the reservoir. It can be accessed by staying to the left a short distance down the access road.

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The Reservoir

Lower Ten Mile River – Pawtucket/East Providence/Seekonk

  • Lower Ten Mile River
  • Daggett Avenue, Pawtucket, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°53’6.76″N, 71°20’43.05″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 20, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 10 miles
  • Moderate due to distance.

This hike explores the highlights of the lower Ten Mile River from Pawtucket, through East Providence, and into Seekonk. The route of this hike, ironically enough, is about 10 miles and is partly on a bike path, paved neighborhood roads, and trails. It is a one way hike and requires a car-spot. Starting at Doreen Tomlinson Field on Daggett Avenue in Pawtucket, you start this walk by first following the northern most part of the Ten Mile River Greenway Bike Path. The bike path, flanked by post and rail fence, follows the river for a little over three quarters of a mile before coming to Armistice Boulevard. Here, you will see a small dam and waterfall. After crossing the boulevard you are in Slater Park. Soon you will see the one mile marker. Shortly after the marker the bike path makes an abrupt curve to the right and back to the left again. At this point to the right and across the road you can see a pond. A loop around the pond is about a half mile if you choose. In December you will find several Christmas trees decorated here. Just before crossing the road and to the right is the Slater Park Carousel and at the far end of the pond is a bandstand. After you complete the loop of the pond return to the bike path and continue south. To your left the river runs through an area that looks like a canal. These walls were built during the 1930’s by the Works Progress Administration. The bike path then continues south leaving Slater Park, passing under railroad tracks, and soon the first large body of water on the left appears. This is Central Pond and it will remain on your left to the end of the bike path. The southern portion of the bike path crosses into East Providence passing through an old rifle range and former Water Department property before reaching Kimberly Rock Field. Here you want to turn right into the parking lot. A couple hundred feet ahead and on the left is a clearing and a short trail that leads to the adjacent residential neighborhood. The next six tenths of a mile of this hike is on roads. At the end of the trail turn left onto Wildwood Avenue, then right onto Redland Avenue. To the left you can still see Central Pond through the yards. At the end of Redland Avenue, turn left onto Bishop Avenue, and then left once again onto Newman Avenue (Route 152). Be careful here, as traffic is relatively heavy. When you reach Central Pond cross Newman Avenue. The body of water south of Newman Avenue is the Turner Reservoir. You will notice a trailhead just to the right of the reservoir. This is part of the Turner Reservoir Loop Trail. This section of trail follows the shore of the reservoir on one side and the back of a subdivision, with a post and rail fence along the property line, on the other. Soon the trail passes the subdivision and enters a small wooded area. There is a short unmarked trail to the right here that will lead you into the Bridgham Farm Conservation Area. Take it, at the end of the trail turn right and follow that trail to its end. It will come out to a cul-de-sac of the subdivision you just passed. To the left you will notice two things. First, a very large oak tree, said to be over 400 year old known as the Newman Oak. and second, just over the rooftop of the nearby house, you will catch a glimpse of the old windmill that was part of the old farm. After viewing the historic tree and windmill retrace your steps, but instead of turning left back to the reservoir, continue straight. The trail will lead you out to a large open field. This area is what part of the farm was conserved during the 1990’s. Continue straight through the grass field. The trail will slightly turn to the left and lead through the trees back out to the reservoir. Turn right here and follow the earthen embankment towards the Turner Dam. This dam was built in the 1930’s to create the Turner Reservoir as a drinking supply for the City of East Providence. It was used as the primary water supply until the late 1960’s. Continuing you will see a trail to your south that again follows the river. This short stretch of trail will lead you to the parking area along Pleasant Street (Route 114A). From here you want to turn right, then cross the street, and then turn left onto Hunts Mills Road. There is a split in the road, stay left. You will pass the first of two houses on the property. The house is currently boarded up and has seen better days, but there are plans to restore it. The second house, however, is a stunningly beautiful Georgian style home built in the second half of the 1700’s. This is the John Hunt House and it is the current home of the East Providence Historical Society. Just to the right of the house is a gazebo and just to the right of the gazebo is a post with a red trail marker. This is the beginning of the three quarter mile Hunts Mills Trail. The trail first cuts across the north side of the property passing a rather significant sycamore tree before reaching the Ten Mile River once again. Along this stretch there are two rock outcrops to view the river. The first, is somewhat high above the river, is known as Sunset Rock. The second, is by the rivers edge, is known as Otter Rock and received its name by multiple sightings of the river mammal. When the river is running low in the summer months you may catch a glimpse of turn of the century inscriptions on the rock. Continuing to follow the red blazes, you will find yourself in an area that seems abandoned. This is the former Fire Department training grounds. Here there are a couple old tankers and fire tower. There is also a large metal shed. This area is now being leased by the Ten Mile River Watershed Council and they have plans to convert it into a picnic area. Continuing to follow the red blazed trail will lead you to the large grass area behind the Hunt House. There are some informational boards here describing the history of the property. There was once an amusement park here with a carousel. The ring of granite blocks delineates where it once stood. You will next want to pass the gate between the Hunt House and the large stone pump house. Just ahead is the picturesque Hunts Mills Falls. The sounds of the water rushing of the falls makes this a good place to take a break. After taking in the falls for a bit, you will follow Hunts Mills Road back to Pleasant Street, turn right and cross the road once again. You will continue along Pleasant Street crossing the bridge over the Ten Mile River and then through the parking lot. Here is the trail-head to the eastern side of the Turner Reservoir Loop Trail. This section is mostly on boardwalks that cross over the wetlands by the river. Soon you will come back to the earthen dam. The path turns to the left. If you want another view of the waterfall at the dam follow the path, for this hike however, continue straight up the small hill. At the top of the hill you will have a sweeping view of the reservoir. This spot is particularly beautiful during the autumn foliage. To the right the trail continues to follow the edge of the reservoir. This is where you first cross into Seekonk. The trail is now faintly blazed blue and you will follow those blazes to Arcade Avenue with the exception of a few minor detours. Along this trail you will pass the Seekonk High School athletic fields. In the woods to the right you will find a shelter with a stone pillar by it. This is a monument to three Seekonk High School students who lost their lives on the reservoir in 1998. Further along the blue trail, there is a trail that splits to the left and leads out to a peninsula that offers great views of the reservoir in every direction. If you choose to visit either of these sites be sure to return to the blue blazed trail and follow it to Arcade Avenue. After reaching the road, you will have about a mile of road walking. You will want to turn left onto Arcade Avenue, then left onto Newman Avenue. You then need to cross Newman Avenue to get to and follow West Avenue. You will follow West Avenue to the fourth left. This is West River Street and you will turn left here. Turn left again at Reservoir Street and follow it to the end. The asphalt ends and the dirt road turns to the right. On the left is the sign for the Seacuncke Sanctuary and its trail-head. Follow the trail into the sanctuary. It soon splits, stay to the right and you will find yourself on the main trail, known as the Seekonk Trail, that runs along this side of Central Pond. There are other narrower trails that run parallel to this trail. As long as you are going north they all lead to the same spot. The trail then starts to turn slightly to the right and ahead you will see a split. There are two trails here with a gully in between. Both of the trails are blazed blue. The trail to the right will lead you to the majority of the trails of the Gaminno Pond Preserve. For this hike stay to the left. Soon you will be flanked by water. To the left is Coles Brook and to the right is Gaminno Pond. Continuing to follow the blue blazed trail, you will see a mulch covered trail on the left that leads to the Gaminno Pond parking area. Continue ahead a short distance. The blue blazed trail turns to the right. Stay to the left here following an old road that leads up to the Seekonk Meadows and to the parking lot for the Seekonk Library where you left another vehicle. This hike takes about four and half to five hours at a relaxed pace.

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Ten Mile River Greenway Bike Path

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Hunts Mills Falls

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Turner Reservoir