Posts Tagged ‘ Reservoirs ’

Lane Homestead – Foxboro

  • Lane Homestead
  • Laprelot Road, Foxboro, MA
  • Trailhead:  42° 5’8.04″N, 71°15’21.22″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 18, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.2 miles
  • Easy.          

 

On the west side of the Neponset Reservoir lies system of trails. From the second parking area past the Learning Center and adjacent park is the beginning of the “Storybook Trail”. This trail, short in itself, is a good trail for young children venturing out into the woods. Following this trail there are several posts with a page from a children’s book. There are over 20 pages to read following the trail counter-clockwise. After passing two pillars and following the trail downhill, the Storybook Trail turns to the left. Take a break from the story for a moment and continue straight passing a shed like structure along the reservoir. Turn to the left after the structure. There are two dead end trails to follow here that each lead to points with sweeping views of the reservoir. From here retrace your steps back past the structure and turn right back onto the Storybook Trail. This stretch is also part of the 33 mile Warner Trail. Continue to follow the posts. Soon you will turn left, stay to the left when you reach a grassy area with an abandoned garage. The trail continues back into the woods. At the next intersection turn right and retrace your steps back to the parking area. Keep in mind that the parking lots are closed here when there are events at nearby Gillette Stadium.

 

Map can be found at: Lane Homestead

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Along The Neponset Reservoir

Easton Pond – Newport

 

Known mostly by locals, is a short stone dust path atop a portion of the levees of Easton Pond. The path follows most of the western edge and part of the northern edge of the pond. There are two entrances to the walking path. One is on Old Beach Road, but parking is not really an option here. The second entrance is at a parking lot for the Newport Little League field on Ellery Road. From the walking path looking south you can see over Memorial Boulevard and First Beach to the Atlantic Ocean. Keep in mind that only the stone dust path is open to the public. The remainder of the levees are off limits. You could add additional mileage to this walk by following Old Beach Road south to Memorial Boulevard and then continuing along the Cliff Walk.

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Walking Path Along Easton Pond

~~This walk is dedicated to a friend who recently experienced a tragic loss. You are in all of our thoughts my friend. Hang in there.~~

Stump Pond – Smithfield

 

Stump Pond is known mostly to be a fishing spot. The state owned property however has a short out and back trail that follows the shore of the pond. Starting from the parking area, you can first walk along the dam to the left to catch a sweeping view of the pond. At the end of the walkway is the spillway where Stump Pond (also called Stillwater Reservoir) flows into the Woonasquatucket River. From here retrace your steps and continue to follow the dam towards the woods. A well defined trail then follows the shore winding gently up and down small hills. The trail comes to a small peninsula where there is a cluster of trees leaning over the ponds edge. A trail ahead continues onto private property. For this hike, stop at the small peninsula and enjoy the view before returning back to the parking area.

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A wintry Stump Pond.

Sprague Hill – Glocester

  • Sprague Hill
  • Putnam Pike, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°55’15.19″N, 71°44’17.69″W
  • Last Time Hiked: October 28, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.7 miles
  • Moderate, areas can be difficult due to weather.

This three and a half mile hike explores the lesser traveled paths of two well known hiking destinations and a connecting road between them that crosses over Sprague Hill. Starting at a parking area along Putnam Pike for the Durfee Hill Management Area follow the dirt road beyond the gate. The road winds south before first coming to an area on the left with a small waterfall and some old stone work along Brandy Brook. Continuing ahead the road turns to the right. The trail to the left you will return on. At the next split the follow the road to the left and it will come to Burlingame Reservoir. There are some blazes and marks in this area presumably used by cyclists, ignore them for this hike. Next you will cross the earthen dam of the reservoir. The view of is quite nice here. The next part of this hike can be quite difficult after some rain. The unmarked but relatively defined trail turns away from the reservoir. It is a very rocky trail and after some rain can be quite wet and somewhat flooded. Take your time here and be sure to follow the trail. It soon comes to an intersection. Take a good look around and familiarize yourself with the intersection. You will be returning to this point but following a different trail out. At this point turn right and follow the trail to the southwest. This trail is actually Elbow Rock Road and it is fairly narrow, channeled in areas, and travels gradually up Sprague Hill for about a half mile. Much like the previous trail, it is quite rocky and areas and will be wet, almost stream like, after significant precipitation. The trail is also flanked by areas of mountain laurel and hemlocks. Do note that there are “No Trespassing” signs on each side of the trail after you leave the Durfee Hill Management Area. The trail itself lies within a public right of way. Be sure to stay on this trail ignoring other trails that spur off in either direction until you reach the top of the hill at a four way trail intersection with a parking area. The trail to the left is actually the end of Sprague Hill Road and the lesser known small parking area is public parking for Sprague Farm. For this hike continue straight and follow the dirt road slightly downhill. You may notice white dot blazes here. This is part of the Sprague Farm trail network. Soon on the right you will find a narrow unmarked trail that crosses over a large section of outcrop. Turn here and follow the trail that climbs the hill. This is Elbow Rock. There are no sweeping views here but be aware of the edges. The rock is rather large and looms high above the surrounding forest. From here follow the trail over the rock and to the left back down to Elbow Rock Road. Turn left and retrace your steps back up and over Sprague Hill a little over a mile to the intersection that you had familiarized yourself with. From here follow the trail mostly straight, along the main trail, as it winds to the pond. There is a large field to the right if you choose to explore it. Next the trail comes to another earthen dam and a smaller pond on the left. After heavy rains this is also a challenge as an area of the dam is slightly compromised and water flows over it into Brandy Brook. Next there is a small bridge that crosses a stonework channel. Turn right and retrace your steps back to the parking area. Hunting is allowed in these areas, be sure to wear orange during hunting season.

Trail maps can be found at: Sprague Hill

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Burlingame Reservoir

Scotstun Town Forest – Glocester

  • Scotstun Town Forest
  • Chopmist Hill Road, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°53’52.80″N, 71°40’10.36″W
  • Last Time Hiked: October 21, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Fairly easy.

 

This property lies on the east shore of Smith and Sayles Reservoir. There is a short quarter mile trail that leads to the shore of the reservoir from Chopmist Hill Road. The trail head is just about opposite Hemlock Road next to utility pole number 124. The trail head is not by the sign a little further up the road, if you are not looking for it you will miss it. The trail winds through the woods canopy of pine, hemlock, and beech trees among others. The trail is not blazed but is definable enough to follow and dead ends at the reservoir. According to the trail map (which can be obtained at Glocester Town Hall) there are plans to add future trails.

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Smith And Sayles Reservoir

White Mill Park – Burrillville

 

This small town park sits on the site of a former mill. In fact two mills. The first occupied this location from 1834 to 1892 when it burnt down. A second mill was built and was here until the 1970’s. Today the property features the old dam with its waterfall that creates a small reflective reservoir. A pedestrian footbridge crosses the Clear River to the wooded portion of the property. There are a handful of trails beyond the bridge. There is also a playground here.

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The Bridge At White Mill Park

 

Quaddick State Park – Thompson

  • Quaddick State Park
  • Quaddick Town Farm Road, Thompson, CT
  • Trailhead: 41°57’21.27″N, 71°48’43.11″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 2, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.6 miles
  • Easy with some elevation.

 

Just over the border in Connecticut is a quaint and small State Park used mostly for swimming. There is also a mile and a half red blazed loop trail that traverses throughout the park. It is a well blazed trail that gently climbs up and down rolling hills, follows the shore of the Quaddick Reservoir for a moment, and passes by Poor Farm Brook. There are many stone walls through the fern covered forest of towering pines. There are also many birds that could be heard here.

 

Trail maps can be found at: Quaddick State Park

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Stone Walls And Tall Pines