Posts Tagged ‘ Rivers ’

Weir Riverfront Park – Taunton

 

Along the Taunton River is the Weir Riverfront Park that runs along East Water Street. The suburban park offers a small parking area, a canoe launch, a playground, a a three tenths of a mile walking path along the river. A new addition to the park has opened across the river on West Water Street with another short section of walking path.

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Weir Riverfront Park

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Woonasquatucket River Bike Path – Providence/Johnston

  • Fred Lippett Woonasquatucket River Greenway Bike Path
  • Allepo Street, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°49’11.31″N, 71°26’52.80″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 11, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 4.8 miles
  • Easy.

 

Since the 1990’s the Onleyville section of Providence has been going through a revitalization and part of it has been the development of the Greenway. Merino Park, Donigian Park, and the most recently Riverside Park have been refurbished and reopened. The highlight of the Greenway is the 2.4 mile bike path from the outskirts of Onleyville, through Manton, and into Johnston. Starting at Allepo Street at Riverside Park in the shadows of the iconic Onleyville towers of the Atlantic Mills, the bike winds along side the river and through the park. Here is a community garden, a dam and waterfall, and a bike shop. The bike path then slowly climbs uphill meeting with the pedestrian bridge that leads to Merino Park. The bike then winds down hill and follows the bustling Route 6 for a bit passing the bike paths famous mural. The river at this point crosses under the highway.  The bike then starts to pull away from the highway and the river rejoins on the left just before passing under Glenbridge Avenue. From here on the bike path becomes much quieter as it pulls away from the city. Soon on the right is the Manton Gateway, a section of bike path that leads to the Manton neighborhood. There is also a skate park along that stretch. Continuing ahead the bike path crosses over the river. You are now entering Johnston. The Button Hole Golf Course is now on the left and the river is to the right. Just ahead is an access path to Hedley Avenue. Continuing ahead the bike path follows the river to Greenville Avenue. Use caution crossing here as this is a very busy street. After the crossing the bike path continues a little over a half mile to its terminus at Lyman Avenue. Along the way at the Goldsmith Street crossing take a peek at Manton Pond and its fish ladder by following Goldsmith north a few feet and then turning right following the path to the dam. After reaching the end of the bike path retrace your steps back to Onleyville for a roundtrip walk of nearly 5 miles.

 

Map can be found at: Woonasquatucket River Bike Path

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The Bike Path Crossing the Woonasquatucket River at the Providence/Johnston Border.

Stoddard Hill – Ledyard

  • Stoddard Hill State Park
  • Connecticut Route 12, Ledyard, CT
  • Trailhead:  41°27’34.60″N, 72° 3’50.40″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 17, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.7 miles
  • Fairly easy with some significant elevation.

 

This small State Park along the Thames River offers a towering ledge of boulders and a historic cemetery. There is a boat ramp here at the cove and small network of trails. The main trail, unblazed, climbs slightly uphill at first then follows the bank that overlooks the river and railroad below. The trail winds to the left of the ledge slowly going uphill and eventually dead ending near private property. Retracing your steps back a bit you find a trail to the left that leads to the cemetery of the Stoddard Family. Graves here date back to the 1800’s and members of the family fought in the Revolutionary War and War of 1812. There is a trail to the south that leads back to the main trail, downhill, and to the parking area

 

Map can be found at: Stoddard Hill

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Historic Stoddard Family Cemetery with Ledge Behind It.

American Locomotive – Providence

  • American Locomotive Works Walking Path
  • Eagle Street, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°49’38.93″N, 71°26’2.83″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 25, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.7 miles
  • Easy.

 

The American Locomotive Works Complex once produce steam locomotives that were (and still are) used all over the country. The buildings were vacant for several years after the company cease to exist. In recent years the complex has been revitalized. There is also a publicly accessed walking path from Eagle Street to the parking area along Hemlock Street that follows the shore of the Woonasquatucket River along side the old factory buildings. The walk out and back is just about three quarters of a mile. Public parking is available at the end of the parking lot accessible from 10 Eagle Street (US Rubber Lofts).

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Walking Through Yesteryear.

Mumford Riverwalk – Northbridge

 

This riverwalk, about seven tenths of a mile one way, is a pathway that meanders between Linwood Avenue and the Mumford River at Linwood Pond. The trail is covered in pine needles as it winds up and over small hills along the waterfront. Birds are quite abundant here especially water foul. Parking is available about midway along the trail or at the north end opposite Lasell Field.

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Along the Mumford Riverwalk

Poquonnock River – Groton

 

Just north of Bluff Point along Depot Road is a half mile boardwalk (one mile out and back) that runs along the Poquonnock River to Poquonnock Road. The boardwalk offers some views of the river itself as it winds behind a residential neighborhood. The boardwalk is a good location for spotting birds as there is quite a bit of brush for them.

 

Map can be found at: Poquonnock River

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Along the Boardwalk

North Burial Ground – Providence

  • North Burial Ground
  • Branch Avenue, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°50’34.92″N, 71°24’29.28″W
  • Last Time Hiked: November 23, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.5 miles
  • Easy with some hills.

 

The North Burial Ground is a historic cemetery owned by the City of Providence and open to the public daily from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The walk here at the cemetery makes for a good companion to the Historic Providence walk as many of the folks mentioned in that walk are buried here. There is no set route for this walk as there is so much to see. One could spend an hour or an entire day here. The group I was with walked about two and a half miles in about two and a half hours stopping at about a third of the graves listed on the back of the map (available at the front office). For our walk we stopped at the Elks Plot with its famous statue, the graves of the Brown Brothers (John, Nicholas, and Joseph) whom played great roles in Colonial Providence, and Samuel Whipple who was the first to be buried here. We continued on to look for the grave of Sarah Helen Power Whitman who was Edgar Allen Poe’s fiancé, onto Randall Park which is a long strip of land within the fence along North Main Street with no graves, and then to the grave of Col. William Barton who fought at Bunker Hill. Fort Barton in Tiverton is named for him. Next we stopped at the marble steps built from the excess stone used to build the State House before moving onto the grave of Charles Dow, the founder of the Wall Street Journal. Making our way to the northern end of the cemetery we crossed arguably the most preserved section of the Blackstone Canal which served as a commerce route between Providence and Worcester. Beyond the canal is Potters Field which is free ground used to bury the poor and unknown. The cemetery has two interesting natural features being an esker and pond. The esker is a hill of sand and gravel left behind by the last glacier. The pond, small in size, offers a haven for passing birds. The group then swung around the west side of the hill. At the top of the hill is the Brown Mausoleum and the grave of Nicholas Brown II of Brown University fame. The next stop was the Receiving Tomb built in 1903. This structure housed the remains of Roger Williams from 1932 to 1939 before he was relocated to Prospect Terrace. The grave of Samuel Bridgham, the first mayor of Providence, was the next stop. His family farm was located in Seekonk, now East Providence along the Ten Mile River. For the conclusion of the walk we passed the Spanish American and Civil War monuments and then passed the Firefighters Monument before heading back to the main entrance. Parking is available along North Main Street and dogs are not allowed on the property. Group tours are provided on occasion by Sean Briody (follow their Facebook page). For other questions contact Rose Martinez at 401-680-5318.

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North Burial Ground looking towards The State House.

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