Posts Tagged ‘ Salt Marsh ’

Allens Pond East – Dartmouth

 

Allens Pond is a Masachusetts Audubon property along Buzzards Bay. The property offers 6 to 7 miles of trails. It is a diverse and beautiful property offering several types of features from beaches to fields to woodlands. With that being said, I have decided to break the property into three separate hikes to maximize visiting all of the trails without having an overwhelming hike distance. For the first hike, I started at the easterly trailhead along Allen Neck Road and followed the mowed path to a stone wall and gate. This is the beginning of the Woodland Loop. Continuing straight ahead I followed the path over some boardwalks that went over several small streams. The loop passes a few ledges and glacial outcrops as well. The trail soon comes to a dirt road. You may catch a glimpse of the cows in the field in front of you. Turn right here onto the road and immediately turn left after the stone wall and again immediately right onto the Boulder Trail. This will put you on a small loop path that will bring you by two massive boulders. At the next intersection turn right. You will soon come to another intersection. Here continue straight. The trail winds through thick shrubs and you will come to another significant boulder before coming to the end of the trail. Turn right now onto the Grassland Trail. It will descend slightly downhill before coming to a farm road. Turn left here and follow the road to the large open field. Stay to the left and follow the perimeter of the field. You will see a sign for the Quansett Trail. On your left here is a path that leads to a loop trail that follows the perimeter of a field. It will add a half mile to your hike if you so choose to do it. For this hike continue straight along the Quansett Trail. Look for a post on the left by a narrow trail. When you find it follow the narrow path to a scenic viewing area. From here you can view the salt marsh and Buzzards Bay beyond. From here retrace your steps back along the narrow path, turn right onto the Quansett Trail, continue around the field, following the Grassland Trail back to the Boulder Loop. Instead of turning left where you came in, continue straight briefly before taking the next left. Follow this trail back to farm road by the cows. Be sure to check out the stone wall on your right along the way as you are very likely to find frolicking chipmunks. Also look for a vernal pool on your left along this stretch. After turning right onto the farm road, pass the trail on the left (the one you came in on) and then veer to the left onto the next trail. This will lead you back into the woods and over another boardwalk before ending at the stonewall and gate by the entrance trail. Turn right here to get to the parking area.

 

Map can be found at: Allens Pond East.

TWRI-APE04

Woodland Loop Return by the Farm Road

Pheasant Hill Beach – Portsmouth

 

At the end of Pheasant Road just after the railroad tracks and to the right is a parking area for Pheasant Hill Beach. From here you can follow the road a few hundred feet to the walking path the follows the shoreline toward the Mount Hope Bridge. At the end of the path there is a narrow trail that continues ahead. Along this trail are sweeping and stunning views of a marsh to your right, the bridge ahead, and Hog Island Lighthouse to your left. At the end of the trail are a row of boulders. From here turn left and make your way to the beach. From here you can follow the beach back a bit to one of the access points back to the walking path that leads back to the parking area.

TWRI-Pheasant3

Walking Path With Mount Hope Bridge In The Distance.

Town Pond – Portsmouth

 

This out and back trail is well maintained and follows the west shore of Town Pond on one side and Founders Brook beyond the shrubs and thickets on the other side. The trail is accessible from an unmarked parking area on Anthony Road and the trail starts from the left side of the lot. The shrubbery along the trail serves as a haven for birds of all sorts. There are also utility poles here with nests for ospreys here. Hawks, owls, a great blue heron, ducks, and swans were all observed here at the time of this walk. The trail ends at the railroad tracks and across the way is the Bertha Russel Preserve which is essentially a tidal marsh protected for wildlife. This area is also significantly historical as this is approximately where Anne Hutchinson founded the colony which became Rhode Island in 1638. Founders Brook Park is nearby and has monuments commemorating the event.

TWRI-Founders2

From the end of the trail looking over the Russel Preserve

Knowles-Padanaram – Dartmouth

  • Knowles-Padanaram Reserve
  • Smith Neck Road, Dartmouth, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°35’3.48″N, 70°57’5.26″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 20, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.0 miles
  • Easy.

 

Knowles-Padanaram is a small property that extends on each side of West Smith Neck Road. The nearly 1 mile of trails weaves through a mix of trees and shrubs and skirts a salt marsh. The property also has a trail that leads to Dike Meadow Creek and a small pond. There was an abundance of several small birds here as well as seagulls. The main entrance is closed due to bridge and causeway construction along Smith Neck Road and Gulf Road. The reserve can be accessed via West Smith Neck Road.

 

Trail maps can be found at: Knowles-Padanaram

TWRI-Knowles02

Salt Marsh at Knowles-Padanaram

Smith Farm – Dartmouth

 

What a pleasant surprise of a property. One must say that the Dartmouth Natural Resources Trust has some beautiful properties. Just down the road from Cornell Farm is Smith Farm. In comparison the trail system at Smith Farm is much shorter than Cornell but it is well worth the visit. The front end of the property offers a series of stone walls and what appears to be foundations. Starting by following the red blazed trail, you soon enter the woods. Among the deciduous trees are several holly trees and shrubs. The red trail soon comes to a large open field with one prominent pine tree. Follow the path across the field to continue following the red blazed trail. The next section of woods offer some swamps, wetlands, and stone walls. Next follow the blue blazed trail around Horseshoe Pond. It crosses several trickling streams as it follows the ponds edge. At the time of this hike I had come across an owl and several ducks. After following the blue blazed trail around the perimeter of the pond turn left at the red blazed trail and follow it to its end. Turn left and follow the orange blazed trail to its end. There you will find an observation platform that overlooks Nonquitt Marsh. From here follow the orange blazed trail back, staying on it to the parking area. It follows an old cart path road passing several stone walls and a vernal pool.

 

Trail maps can be found at: Smith Farm

TWRI-Smith01

Field at Smith Farm

Star Of The Sea – Dartmouth

 

Star Of The Sea is a well hidden property along the west side of the same named road. There are two trail heads along the road. Only the northern trail head is marked with a small sign on a fence post. There is a larger kiosk just a few feet into the woods with more information. This hike consists of doing both the red blazed and blue blazed loops as well as the red blazed connector trail and a visit out to the old causeway. The tree and grass covered causeway offers views of a marsh and the upper reaches of the Apponagansett River. The loop trails meander around the wooded areas of the property occasionally crossing seasonal streams. Hunting is allowed on portions of this hike.

 

Trail maps can be found at: Star Of The Sea

TWRI-D-SotS

View From The Causeway

Johannis Farm – Barrington/Swansea

  • Johannis Farm Wildlife Preserve
  • Barrington, RI
  • Trailhead: Undisclosed
  • Last Time Hiked: April 9, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.2 miles
  • Fairly easy with some areas of mud.

 

Along the shore of the Palmer River, this uniquely fragile piece of land is one of the Barrington Land Conservation Trusts most beautiful properties. Partly the reason for that is the fact that it is quite preserved. The property is only open to the general public during tours. Johannis Farm includes open fields, farmland, salt water marshes and wetlands, as well as woodlands. The property is great for bird watching and is home to egrets, ospreys, geese, ducks, and bald eagles. The walk, just over a mile and led by a member of the Land Trust, covers all the features of the property. There are a couple wooden footbridges to cross. They are narrow, tend to be slick, and could be challenging to those with balance issues. It is a very damp site, so proper footwear is required, waterproof boots are highly suggestible. The property extends into Swansea and also abuts the Barney/Bell Preserve in Swansea as well. Please respect the rules of this property and only visit during public tours. You can contact the Barrington Land Conservation Trust at info@blct.org to inquire about their next public tour.

TWRI-Johannis01

Open Field at Johannis Farm

Conanicut Island Sanctuary – Jamestown

 

This lesser known property consists of a short loop trail and connector that features a few boardwalks. The trail can be a little muddy in spots and is a little root bound, so do watch your footing. There are three observation areas that overlook Marsh Meadows, a large salt cove. The first is an area with a sitting bench, the other two are raised observation decks. Many birds here have been seen including egrets, herons, sandpipers, ospreys, and ibis. Needless to say this spot for birdwatchers and photographers. Across the salt marsh is a farm and it is not uncommon to hear the mooing of cows. The property also features stone walls and a grove of white birch. Parking is not easy at all as the trailhead is actually at a highway off-ramp. The Jamestown Police Station is a few hundred feet south of the property. I had parked there. I did go in and ask permission to do so and suggest that you do to. The little bit of the walk from there to the trail head is well worth it though. This is a great property!

TWRI-CIS

Trail Marker And Stone Wall