Posts Tagged ‘ Waterfalls ’

Old Mountain Field – South Kingstown

  • Old Mountain Field Hiking Trails/Broad Rock Bike Trail
  • St. Dominic Road, South Kingstown, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°27’5.71″N, 71°28’54.57″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 25, 2015
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.5 miles
  • Easy with some slight elevation.

 

We started this walk from the parking area of the Broad Rock Ball Fields. There is a short bike path that leads from the fields to Old Mountain Road. We followed the bike path for about two-tenths of a mile looking for a trail on the left. We then turned at the trail and started heading downhill turning slightly to the right and passing a stone wall. We followed the trail to the bottom of the hill where it ended. We then turned right following the yellow blazed trail that loops around Indian Run Reservoir. The trail first continues through the woods before coming to a horseshoe dam and waterfall. A bridge crosses the dam. The trail then leads back into the woods on the other side of the reservoir. There are several sections of boardwalks along this stretch. After completing the short loop trail, we retraced our steps back up the trail we came in on and back to the car. We came across several ducks at the reservoir.

 

Trail map can be found at: Old Mountain Field.

A Thawing Indian Run Reservoir.

A Thawing Indian Run Reservoir.

 

Notte Park/Camp Meehan – North Providence/Lincoln

  • Governor John Notte Memorial Park/Camp Meehan
  • Douglas Pike, North Providence, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°52’17.16″N, 71°27’51.35″W
  • Last Time Hiked: March 21, 2015
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.3 miles
  • Easy.

 

This walk covers two properties in two towns. The first property in North Providence is the Governor Notte Park. This property features ball fields and tennis courts. The second property is Camp Meehan which has been recently acquired by the Town of Lincoln. The abutting properties border Wenscott Reservoir and together offer a short and easy walk of just over a mile. The walk starts from a small parking area by the reservoir. The walking path soon crosses and dam and waterfall at a bridge. At the time of this walk, the ground was still covered in snow, so I followed mostly paved areas. After crossing the bridge I stayed to the right of the blue painted brick building and followed a road. I then turned left, keeping the reservoir to the left. I soon came to a parking area with a new building being built. Ahead is a paved path that leads into Camp Meehan. Here I crossed into Lincoln and followed the path. The path is about 4/10 of a mile long and winds through an area of pines. The path eventually ends at Angell Road. From here I retraced my steps back to the car.

 

I did not find a trail map on-line.

Bridge Crossing The Dam And Waterfall

Bridge Crossing The Dam And Waterfall

Goddard Woods – Plainville

 

The Natural Resource Trust of Plainville owns this property wedged between Route 152 and Turnpike Lake along Shepard Street. The property was once the site of a mill. There is a sign at the entrance explaining the history of the property. Today there are nothing but the remains of the mills including several small dams. There is a small series of trails here that weave throughout the property. Most follow the streams and along a manmade canal. The streams, with the dams, offer several spots with small waterfalls. The trails here are not blazed, however, the property is not big enough were you will get lost. The main trail offers most of the highlights. This trail is narrow first passing a large field before crossing the canal. The trail will eventually end at Turnpike Lake before passing several remains including an old wooden mill wheel. Some of the newer features includes a section of boardwalk and a bridge both built by local Boy Scouts.

 

I did not find a trail on-line.

Trail Along The Canal

Trail Along The Canal

Tri State Marker – Thompson/Burrillville/Douglas

  • Tri State Marker
  • East Thompson Road, Thompson, CT
  • Trailhead: 42° 0’31.89″N, 71°48’32.66″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 27, 2014
  • Approximate distance hiked: 4.2 miles
  • Moderate, difficult in areas with rocky footing and hills, rest is fairly easy.

 

Upon a knoll deep in the woods is where the states of Rhode Island, Massachusetts, and Connecticut meet. At that point is a granite marker. It is not an uncommon occurrence in the United States. But here it is all on public land and there are trails leading to it. Although this hike was not just to the marker and back, it certainly is one of the highlights of it. This hike would lead us through all three states using various trails. We (myself, Auntie Beak, and a another fellow hiker) started at East Thompson Road where the Airline Trail crosses the road. This would be the first highlight of the hike. At this location on December 4, 1891 the Great East Thompson Train Wreck occurred. It was the only four train collision in the countries history. There is signage here explaining the event. From here we headed east along the Airline Trail. The trail itself is the former railroad bed. It is now just a flat wide dirt and gravel path. We soon came to an old wooden bridge that crossed the path. The bridge was apparently used to herd livestock safely over the railroad. Just after the bridge and to the left is a faint path that leads toward the bridge approach. Here is the next highlight of this hike. It is the Hermit Cave. The small hole in the side of the hill is the entrance to the cave. Inside the cave (flashlight required) is some impressive stonework. No one knows for sure who built it, but it appears to be similar to many root cellars found throughout New England. Continuing on the Airline Trail we soon came to a sign for the blue-blazed Tri State Marker Trail. Here we turned right and started the fairly short (three tenths of a mile) but relatively challenging uphill and rocky climb toward the next highlight of this hike. This trail follows the Connecticut/Massachusetts border. At the top of the trail is a small clearing with a large granite marker. This is the Tri-State marker. The monument, dated 1883, has the abbreviations of the three states inscribed in it. The trail to the right would lead you back to the Airline Trail if you decide you have seen enough. The trail straight ahead, called the Border Trail by locals, would lead you along the Connecticut/Rhode Island border into the heart of the Buck Hill Management area. We opted to follow the trail to the left (east) that follows the Rhode Island/Massachusetts border. We were in the extreme northern edge of Buck Hill along this trail. The trail, still rocky and somewhat difficult, continues to climb uphill, passing a few more state boundary markers along the way. The trail soon ends. We turned left onto the next trail and into the Douglas State Forest. The trail, unblazed and unnamed steadily descends down the opposite side of the hill we just climbed over. The hike from here on is relatively easy as most of the inclines were now behind us. Along this trail we came across the first of some quite impressive cellar holes. At the next intersection we turned left onto the yellow blazed Mid-State Trail. We followed the Mid-State for a while passing yet another impressive cellar hole. The Mid-State then turns to the right (sign on tree says “PARK”), we followed the trail to the left and continued downhill, passing a small stream, to a four way intersection at the Southern New England Trunkline Trail. This trail is a continuation of the railroad bed we came in on. It just has a different name on the Massachusetts side. Before turning left and following the trail back to the car, we did a little exploring to the right and straight ahead checking out some of the water features. Rocky Brook offers some small cascading waterfalls and the pond here was still with some nice reflections. Both Buck Hill in Rhode Island and the Douglas State Forest in Massachusetts are open to hunting. We did come across hunters on this hike. Be sure to wear blaze orange during hunting season.

 

Trail map can be found at: Tri-State Marker. (courtesy of Auntie Beak)

 

The Tri-State Marker

The Tri-State Marker

Reflections

Reflections

Saugatucket River – South Kingstown

 

In the heart of Wakefield is a short Riverwalk along the shore of the Saugatucket River. We started this walk from the free parking lot behind the 330 block of Main Street. We then followed the boardwalk along the river toward the dam and waterfall. The walkway then comes out to Main Street. Here we turned right crossing the river and then turning right onto High Street to Saugatucket Park. We then followed the paved path in the park along the opposite shore of the river. We soon came to Sari’s Sanctuary. It is a large wooden covered dock on the shore of the river. It was built in the memory of Sarah McClarnon. From here we crossed the footbridge back over the river to the parking lot.

 

I did not find a trail map on-line.

Sari's Sanctuary And The Footbridge Over The Saugatucket River.

Sari’s Sanctuary And The Footbridge Over The Saugatucket River.

Freetown South – Freetown/Fall River

  • Freetown South – Freetown State Forest
  • Bell Rock Road, Freetown, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°45’33.32″N, 71° 4’17.59″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 14, 2014
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.8 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

EXERCISE EXTREME CAUTION NEAR THE EDGES OF THE CLIFFS.

 

I ventured into the Freetown State Forest for the first of three planned hikes. This morning I choose to do the southern end of the forest. I was joined by a small group of hikers from The Providence County Hiking Club. We started from a parking area along Bell Rock Road. There are two trail heads here. We took the one by the large sign at the south end of the lot. The trail here is short, narrow, and well rutted from ATV use. It leads to a dirt road named Haskell Path. At the end of the trail we came to a gate. We turned right onto Haskell Path and followed it slightly downhill to a four way intersection with gates, passing several side trails we ignored. At the four way intersection we turned left onto a trail named Ledge Road. The road continues downhill and is flanked by the forest. We soon approached a fork in the road. We stayed to the left and continued to the a small stone bridge that crosses Rattlesnake Brook. (The road to the right would be our return route). After crossing the brook, and crossing briefly into Fall River, the road begins climbing, passing several side paths, as well as the Pond Trail and the Mothers Brook Trail. The road, well worn from the weather in areas, passes through areas of beech and pine trees. At the top of the hill a large area of ledge appears on the right. Use caution in this area. We explored the area enjoying the overlook. The view to the east looks over the pond below and the forest as far as the eye can see. We then returned to the road continuing north and started gradually going downhill. We then took a right onto the next road followed by another almost immediate right. This road leads to the shore of the pond. From here you get a good perspective of how high the ledge is. Here there is an intersection where we would turn left. However, we explored the short road along the edge of the pond before continuing. There are a few spots to enjoy the view here and there is a waterfall as well. We then turned left at the intersection and continued the hike crossing Rattlesnake Brook once again. Shortly after the brook we encountered another fork. The trail to the left is the Wampanoag Path. We stayed to the right passing a rather large gravel pit on the left before reaching the first fork we encountered. Here we went left and retraced our steps back to the parking area.

Trail map can be found at: Freetown South.

The Ledge and Pond

The Ledge and Pond

Weetamoo Woods/Pardon Gray Preserve – Tiverton

  • Weetamoo Woods/Pardon Gray Preserve
  • East Road, Tiverton, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°34’19.94″N,  71°10’37.90″W
  • Last Time Hiked: November 28, 2014
  • Approximate distance hiked: 5.6 miles
  • Moderate with optional areas of climbing that can be difficult.

  

The first true signs of winter made for a very cold but picturesque hike at Weetamoo Woods. The woods are named for the sachem of the Pocasset Wampanoags. I was joined by a group for this hike, some being locals, who knew the property fairly well. We started from the parking area at the southern end of the property along East Road. We headed north into the property on an old section of Eight Rod Road. Soon we came to an informational board where trail maps can be found. From this point we continued straight following the yellow trail. The old road passed open fields to the right and an old stone wall (the first of several on the property) on the left before crossing Borden Brook. The brook at the time of this hike was fast flowing as it fell over a small waterfall by the slab bridge. We followed the yellow trail, passing a cellar hole on the left, until we came upon the red trail. Take your time looking for some of the blazes. Although most of the property is well marked we did have some difficulty at some of the intersections location the markers. We then followed the red blazed trail until we came to an old sawmill site. The stream here runs through an old channel and then under a beautifully constructed stone arch bridge. To appreciate the craftsmanship of the structure take a quick detour off the trail to the shore of the stream. After looking around at the mill remains we then followed the blue blazed trail (just before the mill on the left) uphill. The trail meanders up the hill a bit before coming to an area on the right that has been clearly traversed by many. This area is the foothill of High Rock. We followed the un-blazed trail, led by our locals, up to the peak of High Rock. Some of the trail requires some climbing and can be difficult. We had a light snowfall in the morning and the leaves were quite wet adding to the difficulty. We took our time and the climb was well worth it. The view from above overlooks the property well above the tree line. After enjoying the view for a little while we retraced our steps back to the mill site. From there we continued along the red trail (to the left) before turning left onto the green trail. This trail meanders through the heart of the woods passing through an area of mountain laurel. The light dusting of snow contrasted quite nicely with the crisp green leaves. The trail soon crossed the brook once again via a boardwalk. We then reached the intersection of the yellow trail. We went straight onto the yellow trail (left we be our exit) until we reached the second white blazed trail. Both of the white blazed trails are marked with signage. The first, being the South Trail, would lead you to the town farm. We opted to continue to the Cemetery Trail. After turning left onto the Cemetery Trail the trail split again. The Cemetery Trail continues to the left and is blazed white with a red square. The Ridge Trail on the right would be our return route. Following the Cemetery Trail we came across some boulders in the woods, more stone walls, and a vernal pool before coming to an open field. The field is part of the Pardon Gray Preserve and is actively farmed. The preserve is named after a Revolutionary War Colonel. The Cemetery Trail continues straight uphill towards a cluster of tall trees. On each side of the trail is areas of grass being grazed by cows. The areas are fenced off with electric fences. Needless to say, it is advisable not to come in contact with the fences. At the top of the hill under the cluster of trees is the Gray family cemetery bordered by a stone wall. Most of the graves here are from the early 1800’s including Pardon Gray himself. We then retraced our steps through the field back to the tree line. Here we turned left and followed the tree line. The cows in the field on the left seemed very interested in our presence even offering some photo opportunities. The trail soon turned left and we then turned right onto a narrow trail that led us through the woods to Lafayette Road. We turned right onto the paved road and followed uphill to the gate. Here we turned right, through a small parking area, and onto the Ridge Trail. The trail, also blazed white with a red square, passes through areas of holly trees and shrubs before intersecting with the Cemetery Trail once again. Here we turned left and then right onto the yellow trail once again. We then followed the yellow trail to its end back at the parking area. On the way out at the end of the hike we were greeted by a very friendly pony on the farm property on the right.

 

Trail map can be found at: Weetamoo Woods/Pardon Gray.

The Trail To High Rock

The Trail To High Rock

Boardwalk On The Green Trail

Boardwalk On The Green Trail

Cow At Pardon Gray Preserve

Cow At Pardon Gray Preserve

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