Archive for the ‘ ~2 to 3 Miles~ ’ Category

Beaudoin Conservation Area – Coventry

  • Beaudoin Conservation Area
  • Ledge Road, Coventry, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°41’56.06″N, 71°39’21.08″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 22, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.8 miles
  • Moderate, some stream crossings and rocky footing in areas.

 

A lesser known, but truly spectacular, trail system lies in western Coventry just between Route 117 and the Washington Secondary Bike Path. Starting at a parking area with a kiosk along Ledge Road follow the blue blazed trail as it gently descends into the heavily wooded property. This trail is only about a quarter mile long before it comes to the yellow blazed trail. For this hike stay to the left and follow the yellow trail southerly. The trail here is wide and winds downhill even further passing oak, pine, and beech trees. Off in the woods you can see the glacial remains of several boulders. As the yellow trail approaches the Washington Secondary Bike Path keep an eye out for a pair of stone walls on the right. They run parallel as if there was an old lane here. After the second wall and on the right is the beginning of the white blazed trail. You will want to turn here, but first follow the yellow blazed trail to its terminus at the bike path, cross the bike path to another short trail that leads to some ruins. Here along the Quidnick Brook is a large cellar hole of a mill and the remnants of a dam. After exploring the ruins make your way back to the white trail (now on your left). For next three quarters of a mile you will follow the white blazed trail as it winds up and down small hills, over and through streams, and through small boulder fields. This trail is much narrower and has many twists and turns but is very well blazed. Keep an eye out for the blazes especially by stream crossings. The narrow trail soon comes to a cart path at the western most end of the property. If you were to turn left you would come to the bike path once again. However, turn right and continue to follow the white blazes to the yellow trail. At the yellow trail you will want to turn right onto the much narrower trail. (Ahead, the yellow trail follows the cart path to a parking area at Williams Crossing Road). After turning right the trail winds again up and down several small hills and through another boulder field as you head east across the property. The trail comes to another cart path and the yellow blazes take you to the left here. Soon you will reach the blue blazed trail once again where you retrace your steps back to the parking area at Ledge Road.

TWRI-BeaudoinPhoto

One of Several Stone Walls

TWRI-BeaudoinMap

Map of Beaudoin Conservation Area

King Phillips Spring – Fall River

  • King Phillips Spring – Watuppa Reservation
  • Blossom Road, Fall River, MA
  • Trailhead:  41°42’56.24″N, 71° 5’19.86″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 15, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.6 miles
  • Fairly easy with some slight elevation.

 

This 2.6 mile loop starts and follows the route of the Homestead Loop Trail before breaking off and heading east into the depths of the Watuppa Reservation. Starting from a parking area surrounded by a split rail fence follow grass covered cart path away from the road. On the right before the stone wall and power lines is the trail. The trail is first flanked on the left by the stone wall. A few hundred feet ahead the trail passes through the wall and then to a split. Staying to the left you will see the first trail marker (marked by a rabbit). You are on the Homestead Loop Trail at this point. The trail markers for this trail are at every tenth of a mile. There are no other blazes on this loop. The trail passes under the power lines before winding back into the woods. After passing some holly and small boulders you will come upon a trail on the right (marked by a bee). Ignore this trail for this hike and continue straight. You will soon enough come to another “rabbit” marker to confirm you are on the right trail. At the end of the trail you will come to a fire lane where you will turn left. First find a sign on a tree with “KP3” on it to confirm your location. For the remainder of this hike you will want to look for these signs. The trails are not blazed otherwise. Following the fire lane known as Brightman Path you will pass through a swamp before coming to a small pond and what appears to be a small levee on the left. Continuing ahead the path starts to climb uphill. At the next intersection (KP7) continue straight onto the Indian Turn Trail which continues to climb uphill. At the top of the hill is a four way intersection (KP8). Turn left here and within a few hundred feet you will bear to the left (KP16) and start a slow descent. Keep an eye to the left for a wide path. It is a dead end but it takes you to the highlight of this hike, King Phillips Spring. The spring with a large rock surrounding by a cluster of smaller ones is the headwater of Blossom Brook. Take some time here to linger before heading back up to the main trail where you will turn left to continue to make your way to intersection KP17. Bear to the left here and again bear left at the next intersection (KP18). The trail now starts to wind downhill a bit coming to what appears to be a cellar hole on the right. From here the trail bends to the west and narrows quite considerably as it passes through a swamp once again. This stretch, called Corduroy Path, offers very thick shrubs, hemlocks, and junipers. Stop and listen for the birds as it is a haven for them. The trail then passes under the power lines again, back into the woods, pass a gate and ends at Blossom Road. Turn left here and follow the road pass the Reservation Headquarters and over a much wider Blossom Brook. The parking area is a few hundred feet ahead on the left.

 

Map can be found at: King Phillip Spring.

TWRI-KPS09

King Phillips Spring

 

 

Massasoit South – Taunton

  • Massasoit State Park South
  • Bearhole Road, Taunton, MA
  • Trailhead:  41°51’56.43″N, 70°59’15.91″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 21, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.6 miles
  • Fairly easy with some slight elevation.

 

I had come out to Massasoit State Park to start hiking the system of blazed trails. I was prepared to do the blue loop trail at the southern end of the park when I stumbled upon a major obstacle. Sections of the blue loop were closed due to construction. Already committed to a good portion of the loop I backtracked and did the remainder of the open loop before exploring a few of the side trails in the southwestern part of the park. I was informed by a member of the construction crew that the trail would likely be re-opened in a month or so. Nonetheless, the trails that I did explore were rather quiet covered in pine needles and led to several of the parks ponds. The park itself is quite stunning and well maintained and offers a seasonal campground as well. I will be back in the summer to update this blog.

 

Map can be found at: Massasoit South

TWRI-Massa02

Big Bearhole Pond

North Burial Ground – Providence

  • North Burial Ground
  • Branch Avenue, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°50’34.92″N, 71°24’29.28″W
  • Last Time Hiked: November 23, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.5 miles
  • Easy with some hills.

 

The North Burial Ground is a historic cemetery owned by the City of Providence and open to the public daily from 8:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The walk here at the cemetery makes for a good companion to the Historic Providence walk as many of the folks mentioned in that walk are buried here. There is no set route for this walk as there is so much to see. One could spend an hour or an entire day here. The group I was with walked about two and a half miles in about two and a half hours stopping at about a third of the graves listed on the back of the map (available at the front office). For our walk we stopped at the Elks Plot with its famous statue, the graves of the Brown Brothers (John, Nicholas, and Joseph) whom played great roles in Colonial Providence, and Samuel Whipple who was the first to be buried here. We continued on to look for the grave of Sarah Helen Power Whitman who was Edgar Allen Poe’s fiancé, onto Randall Park which is a long strip of land within the fence along North Main Street with no graves, and then to the grave of Col. William Barton who fought at Bunker Hill. Fort Barton in Tiverton is named for him. Next we stopped at the marble steps built from the excess stone used to build the State House before moving onto the grave of Charles Dow, the founder of the Wall Street Journal. Making our way to the northern end of the cemetery we crossed arguably the most preserved section of the Blackstone Canal which served as a commerce route between Providence and Worcester. Beyond the canal is Potters Field which is free ground used to bury the poor and unknown. The cemetery has two interesting natural features being an esker and pond. The esker is a hill of sand and gravel left behind by the last glacier. The pond, small in size, offers a haven for passing birds. The group then swung around the west side of the hill. At the top of the hill is the Brown Mausoleum and the grave of Nicholas Brown II of Brown University fame. The next stop was the Receiving Tomb built in 1903. This structure housed the remains of Roger Williams from 1932 to 1939 before he was relocated to Prospect Terrace. The grave of Samuel Bridgham, the first mayor of Providence, was the next stop. His family farm was located in Seekonk, now East Providence along the Ten Mile River. For the conclusion of the walk we passed the Spanish American and Civil War monuments and then passed the Firefighters Monument before heading back to the main entrance. Parking is available along North Main Street and dogs are not allowed on the property. Group tours are provided on occasion by Sean Briody (follow their Facebook page). For other questions contact Rose Martinez at 401-680-5318.

TWRI-NBG05

North Burial Ground looking towards The State House.

Attleboro Greenway – Attleboro

 

The Attleboro Greenway is a “trail” made up of six distinctively different sections on the outskirts of Downtown Attleboro. The greenway, a little over a mile one way, in its entirety follows Ten Mile River crossing it four times. Starting along Riverfront Drive at the southerly end of Judith Robbins Riverfront Park, follow the paved bike path along the shore of the river. This first section is a newly developed park opened in 2017. It was once a strip of industrial land but has been transformed into a open space allowing access to the river. Besides the bike path, there are several benches for sitting and an area to launch a kayak or canoe. At the end of the bike path turn left and cross the river on a pedestrian bridge. At the end of the bridge turn right and cross Wall Street. The next section is the Kevin J. Dumas Ten Mile River Walkway. It is the newest section of the greenway opened in the fall of 2018. The walkway starts as a paved path that continues to follow the river behind the commercial businesses along County Street. Soon the walkway becomes a boardwalk and rises and crosses over the river. From here the boardwalk weaves along the river through commercial buildings and apartment buildings. Continuing ahead, cross County Street into the Balfour Riverwalk Park. This third section of the greenway is a city park that offers paved paths and playgrounds. For this walk follow the path closest to the river. You will soon come to the “green” bridge. of the left. Here you will cross the river once again entering the fourth section of the greenway. After crossing the bridge, turn right, walk down the stairs, and follow the stone dust path along the rivers edge to Hodges Street. Use the crosswalk to cross the street, turn right, and cross the bridge over the river using the sidewalk. On the left the stone dust path continues again along the rivers edge passing behind and around a community garden. Using the crosswalk to cross Mechanic Street, continue straight along Riverbank Road. Using the sidewalk for this section, the river will be on your left. Follow Riverbank Road for two tenths of a mile. It climbs slightly uphill and to the right. On the right is the Willett Elementary School and on the left is a wooded parcel. Ignore the first trail head on the left and continue ahead until you see a sign for Larson Woodland. Turn left here and follow the trail into the woods. This small and quaint property, the sixth section of this greenway walk, is an Attleboro Land Trust property. Follow the trail to a peninsula that overlooks Mechanics Pond. From here follow the trail closest to the river in a southerly direction passing the Mechanics Pond Dam before exiting the woods back out onto Riverbank Road. From here turn right and retrace your steps back to Judith Robbins Park.

TWRI-ATTG07

New boardwalk along the Ten Mile River

Dunham’s Brook – Westport

  • Dunham’s Brook Conservation Area
  • Main Road, Westport, MA
  • Trailhead:  41°32’37.64″N, 71° 5’14.17″W
  • Last Time Hiked: September 8, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.8 miles
  • Fairly easy.

 

Wedged between Main Road and Route 88, Dunham’s Brook offers nearly 3 miles of trails in three very different and distinctive loops. Starting from the parking area, the trail first follows an open area of grass before entering the woods. At the first wooden bridge look to the right to notice a pond. The next bridge crosses Dunham’s Brook itself. Shortly after that is an area of boardwalk that winds through the thick brush. After taking a sharp right and climbing uphill, you will come to a set of stairs of the left. Go left here first climbing the stairs up to the trail (blue loop) This trail will lead you along the ridge of the hill passing the remains of a stone silo on the left before coming out to a large farm field. The trail bends to the right here. The path to the right (blue loop) will turn back to the south pass a stone wall and end at the orange loop. The path to the left (green loop) will lead you through a large seasonal corn field before entering the woods once again. This section is not shown on the map provided, but is shown at the kiosk at the trailhead. A logging operation was also actively occurring at the time of this hike. Continuing straight the trail will soon turn to the right to complete the loop. Turn left and retrace your steps back through the corn field, pass the silo, and to the stairs. For the last part of this hike, turn left at the bottom of the stairs, follow the trail slightly uphill to the next intersection. Turn left onto the blue trail and follow it to the stone wall at the corn field. Turn right here and follow the orange loop trail as it re-enters the woods. The trail winds through a dense area of woods and wetlands along the southern end of the property. The trail eventually makes a loop and returns to the stairs. From here continue ahead and retrace your steps back to the parking area.

 

Map can be found at: Dunham’s Brook

TWRI-Dunham

The Stairs at Dunham’s Serves as a Good Reference Point

 

Cormier Woods – Uxbridge

  • Cormier Woods
  • Chapin Street, Uxbridge, MA
  • Trailhead:  42° 4’10.60″N, 71°35’41.86″W
  • First Time Hiked: July 15, 2018
  • Last Time Hiked: November 29, 2019
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.6 miles
  • Fairly easy, some moderate hills.

 

There are several miles of trails here at Cormier Woods and the abutting properties. This hike focused on the main trails of Cormier Woods, which in themselves offer an abundance of solitude. Starting from the parking lot by the barn we first crossed the street and made our way to the red trail. At the intersection for the loop we turned left and followed the red trail clockwise first making our way through a narrow fern flanked path before passing a private residence and open field. The trail then winds back into the woods as it heads away from roads and residences. The further into the woods the quieter it would get. The red trail turns to the right as it approaches a swamp on the left and then winds through the western edges of the property coming to a boulder field. At the next intersection stay to the left and follow the blue trail downhill. It turns to the right a couple times and then climbs up a graded trail that looks as if it was once used as a cartpath or railway. At the top of the hill, just after a massive boulder, are a couple cellar holes of the Jonathon White Homestead. Continuing along the blue trail we soon came back to the red trail where we turned left and followed it clockwise steadily uphill for a bit. The trail winds passing ledges and several stone walls before coming to the first intersection. Turning left here returns you to the parking lot. From the parking lot we followed the yellow blazed trail clockwise as well. First through a meadow, then back into the woods. The white blazed trail on the left leads to several more miles of trails at Meadow Brook Woods and furthermore connects to the Mendon Town Forest. For this hike we kept it simple and continued along the yellow trail leading to a blueberry patch that was in bloom (and they were delicious). The trail turns to the right and leads towards the barn and back to the parking area. Hunting is allowed here, so blaze orange is required during hunting season. Deer, coyote, and fisher cat have been observed here as well.

 

Map can be found at: Cormier Woods

TWRI-Cormier02

Passing The Boulder Field