Posts Tagged ‘ Hiking ’

Slocum’s River – Dartmouth

  • Slocum’s River Reserve
  • Horseneck Road, Dartmouth, MA
  • Trailhead:  41°33’6.97″N, 71° 0’34.00″W
  • Last Time Hiked: October 3, 2021
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.2 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

This property has a maze of unmarked trails that offer some spectacular views of the Slocum River and its wetlands. Covering most of the property will give you a hike of over 2 miles. For this hike we did the south end of the property first checking out the Amphitheater, Angelicas Overlook, and the Canoe Landing before doing the loop around a large open field which offered sweeping views. From here we toured the north via the Sam Francis Trail to Sarah’s Field to the short spur to the Grosswendt Reserve which also offers great views of the waterway and wetlands. Making our way back to the parking area we passed through the Bluebird Field. For a longer walk you could cross the road to Dartmoor Farm.

Trail Map: Slocum’s River

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Down By The River

Sullivan Conservation Area – Coventry

  • Janice L. Sullivan Conservation Area
  • Bramble Bush Road, Coventry, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°42’10.93″N, 71°39’1.63″W
  • Last Time Hiked: October 2, 2021
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.0 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

This is the newest of the Coventry Land Trust properties to open. There is a single blue blazed trail that is a half mile long that serves as a connector from the Bramble Bush neighborhood to the Beaudoin Conservation Area on the opposite side of Ledge Road. There is a small meadow at the top of the hill.

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Along The Blue Blazed Trail

Klutz Woodland – Glocester

  • Klutz Woodland – Sprague Farm Town Forest
  • Joe Sweet Road, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°54’1.79″N,  71°42’15.12″W
  • Last Time Hiked: September 4, 2021
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.0 miles
  • Fairly easy with some slight elevation. Can be muddy at times.

The Klutz Woodland is a spectacular addition the sprawling Sprague Farm Town Forest. The trails here have just recently been blazed offering more miles to the already popular hiking destination. Starting from the parking area at the end of Joe Sweet Road follow the red blazed trail into the woods. You will climb up and over a small hill while flanked by mountain laurels, boulders, and a forest floor covered with thickets. Three tenths of a mile into the hike you will come to a green blazed trail. Turn right here to follow the trail through an area of lush ferns. The green trail intersects with the red trail once again. Bear right and stay on the green blazed trail. It winds downhill with a stone wall to the left. The green trail soon ends at the white blazed Sprague Trail. Turn left here and follow the stone wall. The trail then passes through it. Just after that turn left onto the pink blazed trail. This trail offers more mountain laurel and amazing stone walls before ending at the red trail once again. Turn right here and follow the red blazes as the trail zigzags a bit before coming to an outcrop. Here the (future, and still under construction) red blaze trail turns to the right. For this hike, continue straight onto the blue/yellow blazed trail. It will eventually lead out to the unblazed and undeveloped portion on Joe Sweet Road. Turn left here and follow the road back to the parking area. Keep in mind that this section can be a bit wet after heavy rains.

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Stone Wall Along The Pink Trail

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Camara – Westport

Camara Conservation Area is a small property at the western end of town just off of Tickle Road. The short trail system comprises of a loop trail and an out and back trail that leads to a glacial erratic. The entrance passes through an area where you will likely be greeted by chickens. At the time of this hike we came across several chipmunks and squirrels.

Map can be found at: Camara

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Along The Trail At Camara

Headwaters – Westport

  • Headwaters Conservation Area
  • Blossom Road, Westport, MA
  • Trailhead:  41°41’20.19″N, 71° 5’37.57″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 1, 2021
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.8 miles
  • Fairly easy.

This property at the extreme northern end of Westport is made up of two very distinctive parts. The first western half is open to the public and is accessible by trail. The eastern half including the Bread and Cheese Brook is left for nature. For this hike, nearly 2 miles in length, follow the red blazes from the small parking area along Blossom Road. The trail climbs steadily uphill for a bit. Follow the red trail, ignoring the blue blazes to the left and the yellow blazes to the right. You will pas through an impressive pine grove before coming to the properties “major intersection”. Here continue ahead following the red blazes. The trail becomes more of a cart path for a bit surrounded by a forest floor covered in ferns. The trail soon comes to a road. After crossing the road the trail crosses over some boardwalks before coming to a loop. For this hike stay to the left and follow the red blazed trail. At the next split stay to the left and continue following the red blazes. When you reach the orange blazes turn left and follow them. This short trail will get you as close as possible to the brook. Turn left onto the red trail next. It will come into an area of shrubs. Here the trail narrows significantly, especially during the summer months. The trail then heads back into the woods and completes the loop. Stay left here, back over the boardwalks, cross the road, and look for the yellow blazes to the left. Turn onto the yellow blazed trail. It will swoop to the south before turning back to the north. Stay to the right and the trail comes to the “major intersection”. Continue ahead here onto the blue trail and follow it to the red. Staying to the right will bring you back to the parking area.

Map can be found at: Headwaters

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Yellow Trail at Headwaters

Booth Pond – North Smithfield/Woonsocket

  • Booth Pond Conservation Area
  • Dowling Village Boulevard, North Smithfield, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°58’44.15″N, 71°30’21.44″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 10, 2021
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.8 miles
  • Fairly easy, some significant elevation.

A hidden gem behind a bustling shopping area preserved from further development. Starting by a kiosk at the Dowling Village Apartments follow the access trail through a power line easement and into the woods. For this hike we turned left at the first intersection onto the Booth Pond Trail and followed it to the southern shore of the pond. Here you will find evidence of beaver activity and their handy work of tree trimming. Continuing along the trail we then turned left at the next major intersection onto the Border Trail. This trail straddles the town line with Woonsocket. The trail bears to the right when it reaches the pond again. From here we continued pass the “Seasonal Passage”. This area is quite unique as the trail dips substantially below the water level of the pond. A wall of logs and branches of a beaver dam holds the pond back. There is a rocky outcrop just after the dip that looks over the northern end of the pond. This is a good spot to take in the views. From here we continued ahead to a multiple trail intersection. Here we turned to the right onto the Pitch Pine Trail. This trail looks as if was an old cart path as it climbs steadily uphill most of its length. We ignored the trails to the left and then on the right on the way up the hill until we found the trail that turns to the right and goes through the Pitch Pine Grove. At the end of that trail we then turned right onto the Border Trail for a bit and then left onto the Vista Trail back into North Smithfield. We soon passed a trail to the right that we would later exit on. soon we turned left onto a trail to the left that continued to climb uphill a bit until it reached the power lines. We turned right here and followed the trail to the overlook. From the overlook we followed the Vista Trail north and then turned left (trail we passed earlier) and scaled downhill passing some impressive ledges. We then turned left onto the Booth Pond Trail and retraced our steps back to the entrance. There are no blazed trails here (yet) however maps are available at the kiosk. There are many more trails here to explore if you are looking to look around a little further.

Map can be found at: Booth Pond

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Visitor to Booth Pond

Childrens Grove – Bristol

A small wooded parcel along the side of the road offers a short quarter mile crescent shaped trail with a short spur onto an island at the back side of the small pond. The front of the property offers benches to sit by the pond. Though very small, the property is quite plentiful of small critters like chipmunks and squirrels.

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Small Pond at Childrens Grove

Fenway Trail – North Stonington/Griswold/Preston

  • Fenway Trail – Tri Town Ridgeline Preserve
  • Miller Road, North Stonington, CT
  • Trailhead:  41°30’46.07″N, 71°54’15.37″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 22, 2021
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.2 miles
  • Moderate.

This would be the second of three planned hikes here at the Tri Town Ridgeline Preserve. This hike would follow the yellow interior loop known as the Fenway Trail. Starting from the parking area at the bend of Miller Road, follow the red blazed trail into the preserve. The red trail, known as the Axis Road, cuts the property in two offering an easier connection to the two loops or an easier exit if need be. Soon the blue blazed Wapayu Trail comes in from the left. Continue straight ahead following the now red and blue blazes. At the next intersection the blue trails turns to the right. To the left is the yellow loop where you will exit from. Continue ahead here following now the red and yellow blazes. You will be under a canopy of beech trees along this stretch. You will pass a stone wall before coming to the split where the red stays to the left. Veer right here onto the yellow trail. The trail now follows an old cart path. You will get your first glimpses of ridges here and will notice the forest floor is covered with ferns.  The blue blazes rejoin the yellow trail for the first of three times. For this hike you will follow the yellow blazes. You are now leaving North Stonington and entering Griswold. The trail narrows a bit passing some stonework before dipping down into a small valley, crosses a brook, climbs up the first of the hills, before coming to a series of boardwalks. The trail here is rocky and root bound. Watch your step! The yellow trail splits from the blue again briefly as it weaves through an area of beautiful stone walls. Rejoining the blue trail, you will scramble up and over a hill through an area called Oak Alley. There are some rather large trees along the trail and some information about the Pequots. The yellow trail then turns to the left and zigzags down hill and rejoins the blue trail for the last time at the next right. The trail now follows an earthen dam for a bit before winding uphill passing an area of cairns, possibly of Native American origin, before coming to a sitting area. This is a good spot for a break as you are quite a distance from civilization. It tends to be quiet here. Continuing the trail winds downhill crossing over a brook. There is a spur trail to the left for a view of Lost Pond. The trail splits. Follow the yellow to the left. From here it follows a ridge and weaves through a fern covered forest. In this area you will cross into Preston, the third town of the Tri-Town Preserve. Next you cross a “log bridge” before coming to the intersection of the red trail. From here continue ahead and slightly to the right to continue to follow the yellow blazes. This will be the hardest part of this hike. That hill in front of you… you about to climb! You will spend sometime climbing to the top as the trail bends to the south and follows the ridgeline. I saw quite a few deer along this stretch. Near the top of the hill along the trail there is a boulder with a “spike” in it with the inscription “P & G”. Just after this point you will climb over the crest of the hill and start the long steady descent back into North Stonington. Near the end of the yellow trail it climbs slightly uphill one last time. At the next intersection turn right and follow the red blazes back to the parking area.

Map can be found at: Fenway Trail

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Fenway Trail Following A Ridgeline

Old Mill Creek – Warwick

There is an unmarked loop trail off of Draper Avenue opposite the parking area for the walking track. The main trail connects two neighborhoods and the other trail that makes the loop nears Old Mill Creek and Buckeye Brook. There is no actual view of the creek. The trails here are heavily used by ATV’s and dirt bikes.

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At The Entrance by Draper Avenue

Curtis Corner – South Kingstown

  • Curtis Corner – South Kingstown Athletic Fields
  • Curtis Corner Road, South Kingstown, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°27’45.50″N, 71°31’21.57″W
  • Last Time Hiked: May 8, 2021
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.1 miles
  • Easy with some slight elevation.

Curtis Corner offers a short walk and short hike behind the Middle School. But beware of the flying saucers!! There is a disc golf course here that is quite active. For the first part of the walk, make your way to the walking path that goes by the building by the parking lot. Follow this a bit and turn right keeping the soccer fields and stone wall to your right. The walking path wraps around the field passing another path to the left. Keep right here. The path soon enters the woods and ends at the roadway. Turn right and cross the road. You will soon see a trail head on the left. Follow the well defined trail around the small pond. The trail winds through the disc golf course. At the east end of the pond is a sitting bench with a great view. You are likely to see turtles here. Retrace your steps back to the road, turn left and the parking area is just across the street.

Map can be found at: Curtis Corner

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Stream Crossing