Posts Tagged ‘ Walks ’

Sawmill Park Pond – Ledyard

This beautiful roadside attraction offers a short walk under a half mile long around a picturesque pond. The property has a historical sawmill, a dam and waterfall, and a bridge at each end of the pond to complete the loop. Though a short walk, you could spend a bit of time here taking photographs of yesteryear.

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Sawmill and Bridge

Osamequin Farm – Seekonk

At the headwaters of the Runnins River lies the sprawling Osamequin Farm. Known for its farm stand, the operational farm offers trails that are (currently) only open to the public during special events. A visit during a tree identification hike brought a small group for a mile long stroll along just a portion of the farms woodland trails. Along with stone walls, open fields, small ponds and the river, the property is graced with sugar maples, red maples, red oaks, sweet birches, white pines, junipers, spruce, and blooming witch hazel.

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A Farm Road in Fall

Pleasant Valley Parkway – Providence

  • Pleasant Valley Parkway
  • Pleasant Valley Parkway, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°50’8.42″N, 71°26’5.41″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 20, 2022
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.4 miles
  • Easy.

                                                                            

 

A lesser know version of the Blackstone Boulevard (and slightly shorter), Pleasant Valley Parkway offers a stroll along a combination of paved paths, gravel paths, and some street walking. The linear park wedged between the two roads of Pleasant Valley Parkway runs from behind Roger Williams Hospital to Academy Avenue. A drainage swale/stream runs down the center of the park with a couple pedestrian bridges that cross it. There is also a variety of trees within the park that you would not normally come upon in other spots of the city. The walk out and back is just under a mile and a half.

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Walking Path at Pleasant Valley Parkway

Pawtuxet Village/Stillhouse Cove – Warwick/Cranston

  • Historic Pawtuxet Village/Stillhouse Cove
  • East View Street, Warwick, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°45’44.74″N, 71°23’20.36″W
  • Last Time Hiked: August 6, 2022
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.5 miles
  • Easy, some brick walkways.

The history of Pawtuxet Village dates back to 1638 when Roger Williams purchased land from the Narragansett Indian Tribe. The Pawtuxet River at this time would serve as the southern boundary of Providence. Soon thereafter, Samuel Gorton, the founder of Warwick, purchased the land south of the river. The village over the years has served as a seaport, a mill village, as well as the site of one of the most famous pre-Revolutionary War events. Today, it is a destination for restaurants, small businesses, and historical sites. For this walk, start at the parking lot just south of Pawtuxet Park on East View Street. Follow East View Street to Narragansett Parkway and turn right. Here you are greeted by the “Historic Pawtuxet Village” sign. Turn left onto Post Road, now walking opposite traffic, uphill a bit to a crosswalk. At the crosswalk turn right. This brings up to a small triangle area with several perennial flowers. To your right is the 1814 Pawtuxet Bank Building. It was built by the Rhodes Brothers and housed a private school on the second floor. In the late 1870’s it became a hotel with the Bank Cafe on the first floor. It is said that this is where Rhode Island johnnycakes were first introduced. From here turn right and follow, again against traffic, Post Road downhill. Across the street is a row of historic homes built between 1734 and 1800. Making your way downhill you will come upon a stone marker in front of 28 Post Road. The inscription is quite faded, but it indicates that you are five miles from the bridge in Providence. (That would be the bridge at Weybosset Neck, near current day Crawford Street Bridge, being five miles along Broad Street and Weybosset Street.) Continuing downhill you will then come upon a building on the right at the intersection of Post Road and Narragansett Parkway. This building, originally built in 1760, first served as a custom house where ships were registered when they docked. Later it served the village as a post office. Today it is a commercial property. Continuing north, you will cross the Pawtuxet River into Cranston. The river earned its name from the Narragansett word meaning “Little Falls” and that is exactly what you will observe here just below the bridge. The current bridge, built in 1932 is the eighth span at this location. The first bridge was built in 1711. Continuing ahead, now on Broad Street, you will walk through the heart of the commercial district of the village. Here you will find several small shops and restaurants. On the left you will come upon the Pawtuxet Baptist Church. This structure, built in 1891, is the third church on this site. From the time it was built to 1995, the bell in the steeple was used to summons the villages volunteer fire department when needed. Just ahead on the left is the Dr. Comfort-Carpenter house, built in 1750. Today it serves as a law office. Turn right onto Ocean Avenue. This road leads you through a typical New England suburban neighborhood before coming to Stillhouse Cove. Along the way you will pass an English Gothic structure, built in 1903, that houses the Trinity Church. Stillhouse Cove is a narrow bayside park with sweeping views of Upper Narragansett Bay. The park is utilized by dog-walkers, joggers, sunbathers, and yoga classes, to name just a few. At the end of Ocean Avenue at the southern end of the cove is the Rhode Island Yacht Club. It was founded in 1875 and originally located in Providence. It later moved to its current location where the first two clubhouses were destroyed by hurricanes in 1938 and 1954. The current modern day structure, hurricane proof, opened in 1956 and sits twelve feet above sea level. It has since survived hurricanes in 1985 and 1991. Just before the end of Ocean Avenue you will want to turn right onto Fort Avenue. This road is the main throughway onto Pawtuxet Neck. Other than a small marina, the peninsula is all residential. Just beyond Sheldon Street on the left is a marker indicating that once stood a defensive fort at this location that was built in 1775. It was one of a series of forts up and down the Upper Narragansett Bay that protected Providence from British invasion during the American Revolution. Retrace your steps a bit and turn down Sheldon Street. The road dips down to the upper reach of Pawtuxet Cove. You will find several boats docked in this cove. Across from the cove are a row of cottages dating back to 1887. Before turning left onto Springwood Street,  take a peak around the corner of Commercial Street on he right. The original part of this structure was built in the late 1830’s. In 1891, it became the home of the Pawtuxet Village Volunteer Fire Department. The cinder block addition was added several years later. This structure housed the Fire Department until 1995. Continuing on Springwood Street, you will first pass the Arnold House on the left. Built in 1804, the house has a beautiful porch (now partially enclosed) that overlooks the cove. At the end of Springwood Street turn right onto Aborn Street, then left onto Bridge Street. (If you are looking for a quite refresher, stop by the PTX Lounge on Aborn Street before continuing). On Bridge Street you will pass the 1740 Remington-Arnold House before coming back to Broad Street. Turn left on Broad Street and cross the river once again, now back into Warwick. You will pass a couple of houses on the left, all built in 1775, before coming to O’Rourkes. This building was built in 1898 and now houses a bar/eatery that is one of the villages best known stops. Turn left down Peck Lane, laid out in 1734 served as the original road to Pawtuxet seaport. In June of 1772, the British patrol ship HMS Gaspee ran aground. The ship was set afire by colonist protesting British rule over the colonies. The crew of the ship were brought ashore and held prisoners. At the end of the Peck Lane is a monument indicating the spot where the prisoners of the Gaspee were brought ashore. Peck Lane is a public right of way to the edge of the cove (according to the City of Warwick records), however, the road to the right that follows the water to Emmons Avenue is private property. For this walk, retrace your steps back up Peck Lane to Narragansett Parkway, turn left, then turn left onto Emmons Avenue. About halfway down the road on the right is an entrance to Pawtuxet Park. This small city park offers walking paths, gardens, playground, and a gazebo. At the southern end of the park is the Aspray Boathouse, which now serves as a community center. You are now back to the parking lot where you started.

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Small Shops and the Bridge at Pawtuxet Village

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Stillhouse Cove and the Rhode Island Yacht Club on an Early Summer Morning.

Sakonnet Vineyard – Little Compton

  • Carolyn’s Sakonnet Vineyard
  • Peckham Road, Little Compton, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°31’44.04″N, 71°11’2.91″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 24, 2022
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.7 miles
  • Easy.

                                                                            

On the backside of the Carolyn’s Sakonnet Vineyard property along Peckham Road is a small parking area and a kiosk offering public access to this privately owned land. The walk here is just under a mile and encircles an area of vineyards, hayfield, and vegetable fields. The walk is easy, however the low spots can be a bit muddy after a rain event.

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Spring at the Vineyard

Old Harbor – New Shoreham

  • Old Harbor Walking Tour
  • Water Street, New Shoreham, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°10’23.58″N, 71°33’27.07″W
  • Last Time Hiked: October 16, 2021
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.3 miles
  • Fairly easy.

This walk, based on an on-line in town walk (see link below), covers quite a bit of the sights within a reasonable walking distance of the ferry landing at Old Harbor – Block Island. Starting from the ferry walk straight towards the restrooms then turn left and make your way out to Water Street as if you were heading to Ballards. Turn left onto Water Street and almost immediately across the street is the entrance of the Ocean View Trails. Follow the entrance trail slightly uphill. To the left is a narrow trail that leads done to the beach. Follow it to get some impressive beach views. Return back uphill and make your way up to the pavilion. This was the site of the Ocean View Hotel that stood here up till 1966 when it burnt to the ground. There is a narrow trail behind the pavilion that leads to a small garden then downhill and wraps around the backside and then west side of the property before reconnecting with the main entrance trail. Turn left back onto Water Street and then left onto Spring Street. Follow Spring Street uphill about a thousand feet and then turn right at the 1661 gardens. Follow the access road down to the farm. Here you will see emus and ostriches running about for a rather unique zoo experience. From here follow Spring Street back to the intersection with Water Street and turn left onto High Street and then right onto Weldons Way. There are several rental shops for mopeds and bicycles along the street. You will be approached to rent a moped!! At the end of the street turn left onto Chapel Street. You will pass Saint Andrews Church before coming to Old Town Road where you will turn right. The big white building on the left at the next intersection is the Block Island Historical Society. There is a small fee for a tour of the building. Take a left onto Ocean road and a few feet down is Poor Peoples Pub. This is an island staple and a good spot for lunch. Return back to the intersection and take a left onto Corn Neck Road. Follow it to a small park on the left called Solviken Nature Preserve. There are a few picnic benches here. Cross the street and you will find a set of stairs leading down to the beach. At the bottom of the stairs turn right and follow the beach to its end at the left of the Block Island Beach House/The Surf Restaurant. There is a set of stairs that lead back up to Water Street where you find several shops and eateries opposite of the ferry terminal. This makes for a good day trip walk while visiting the island without means of renting other modes of transportation.

Trail Map: Old Harbor Walking Tour.

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Ocean View Pavilion

Juniper Hill Cemetery – Bristol

This historic cemetery opened in the 1850’s and is the final resting place for several famous Bristol residents including the  Colts and the De Wolfes. The cemetery offers narrow winding roads. Following the perimeter will give you a walk of about three quarters of a mile. The cemetery also offers several species of shrubs and trees. Tours are offered here occasionally.

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Entrance to The Cemetery

Central Coventry Park – Coventry

 

This town park has two very distinct offerings. The first is recreation, with tennis courts, ball fields, picnic sites, and a perimeter walk. The second is Cold War history. This park was once the launch location (PR-69 L) for Nike missiles that defended the city of Providence from Soviet bombers. The walk here is short, but for any history enthusiast it is worth the stop. From the parking area follow the chain link fence of the ball field to the southern tree line and turn left following the grass strip between the fence and trees. Follow the fence line to its end and ahead and to the right is a pine needle covered path. A little further up on the left are the old military buildings. From here follow the road back a few feet and turn right onto the access road. Follow the road pass the cell tower. Soon there is grass on the right. Stay to the right here and a short trail follows the fence along the southwest end of the property returning you to where you began.

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Cold War Ruins (?) Just Off The Trail

Silver Creek – Bristol

 

A nice short walk with two very distinctive sections. The front half of this small parcel at the gateway of Downtown Bristol offers gardens and manicured lawn maintained by the Bristol Garden Club known as “Mrs. Perry’s Garden”. The back half offers a short trail that follows the creek to a sitting area with a bench. The entire walk is a little over a quarter of a mile and worth the stop when in the neighborhood.

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View From The Sitting Area

Attleboro Greenway – Attleboro

 

The Attleboro Greenway is a “trail” made up of six distinctively different sections on the outskirts of Downtown Attleboro. The greenway, a little over a mile one way, in its entirety follows Ten Mile River crossing it four times. Starting along Riverfront Drive at the southerly end of Judith Robbins Riverfront Park, follow the paved bike path along the shore of the river. This first section is a newly developed park opened in 2017. It was once a strip of industrial land but has been transformed into a open space allowing access to the river. Besides the bike path, there are several benches for sitting and an area to launch a kayak or canoe. At the end of the bike path turn left and cross the river on a pedestrian bridge. At the end of the bridge turn right and cross Wall Street. The next section is the Kevin J. Dumas Ten Mile River Walkway. It is the newest section of the greenway opened in the fall of 2018. The walkway starts as a paved path that continues to follow the river behind the commercial businesses along County Street. Soon the walkway becomes a boardwalk and rises and crosses over the river. From here the boardwalk weaves along the river through commercial buildings and apartment buildings. Continuing ahead, cross County Street into the Balfour Riverwalk Park. This third section of the greenway is a city park that offers paved paths and playgrounds. For this walk follow the path closest to the river. You will soon come to the “green” bridge. of the left. Here you will cross the river once again entering the fourth section of the greenway. After crossing the bridge, turn right, walk down the stairs, and follow the stone dust path along the rivers edge to Hodges Street. Use the crosswalk to cross the street, turn right, and cross the bridge over the river using the sidewalk. On the left the stone dust path continues again along the rivers edge passing behind and around a community garden. Using the crosswalk to cross Mechanic Street, continue straight along Riverbank Road. Using the sidewalk for this section, the river will be on your left. Follow Riverbank Road for two tenths of a mile. It climbs slightly uphill and to the right. On the right is the Willett Elementary School and on the left is a wooded parcel. Ignore the first trail head on the left and continue ahead until you see a sign for Larson Woodland. Turn left here and follow the trail into the woods. This small and quaint property, the sixth section of this greenway walk, is an Attleboro Land Trust property. Follow the trail to a peninsula that overlooks Mechanics Pond. From here follow the trail closest to the river in a southerly direction passing the Mechanics Pond Dam before exiting the woods back out onto Riverbank Road. From here turn right and retrace your steps back to Judith Robbins Park.

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New boardwalk along the Ten Mile River