Posts Tagged ‘ Walking Paths ’

Ponaganset Covered Bridge Trail – Glocester

  • Ponaganset Covered Bridge Trail
  • Anan Wade Road, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°51’59.71″N,71°42’43.31″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 15, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.0 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

The cross country course behind Ponaganset High School in Glocester may be one of the best kept secret trails in the state. Open to the public when not in use for track meets and other school events, this trail offers a nice 2 mile stroll through some beautiful wooded property that is zigzagged with small seasonal streams. The bridges across these streams are the highlights of this walk, one being a covered bridge. For this walk, you start from the north parking lot of the High School by the superintendents office. Stay to the right and make your way to the football field and track. On the right is the trailhead marked with a sign. Follow the stone dust trail and you soon come to the covered bridge. Continuing, the trail follows the perimeter of a ball field before turning slightly to the right and uphill. At the top of the hill the trail turns to the left and slightly downhill to a four way intersection dubbed “Grand Central Station”. For this walk take the second left. You will follow a loop trail the traverses through the southern end of the property eventually returning to the four way intersection. From the intersection continue straight up and over the hill, back down to the covered bridge, returning to the parking lot.

 

Map can be found at: Ponaganset Covered Bridge Trail.

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Covered Bridge at Ponaganset

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Quequechan River – Fall River

  • Quequechan River Rail Trail
  • Wordell Street, Fall River, MA
  • Trailhead:  41°41’47.97″N, 71° 8’45.86″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 21, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.8 miles
  • Easy.

 

The Quequechan River runs from South Watuppa Pond to the Taunton River and once had a series of eight waterfalls. Quequechan is a Wampanoag word meaning “falling water” in which the city received its name. Most of the river over the years has been built over or channeled for the massive mills that sprouted up along the river. Today a the river is the centerpiece of a former railroad bed that has been converted to a walking path/bike path. Starting from a parking area at the end of Wordell Street follow the paved path along the soccer field at Britland Park. Here you will find a informational kiosk showing the trails. Staying to the right I followed the main stretch of the trail down to Quequechan Street before turning around and retracing my steps. The trail passes over a series of wooden bridges and the river serves as a foreground of the historic mills. Once back to the kiosk, I opted to follow the paved path along between the soccer field and the river to its (currently) dead end and back. The map indicates that this may become a loop in the future. Once back to the kiosk again, I retraced my steps back to the parking area.

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The Fall River Mills serve as the backdrop of this walking path.

Roger Williams National Memorial – Providence

  • Roger Williams National Memorial
  • North Main Street, Providence, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°49’52.55″N, 71°24’38.30″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 18, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Easy.

 

This block long city park offers brick walking paths from one end to the other. It is also where Roger Williams, the founder of Providence, settled in 1636. The park, maintained by the National Park Service, offers several kiosks with historical information, as well as a visitors center in a centuries old building. On the parks property is the fresh water spring that the City of Providence first grew around, several memorials, and gardens. Free two hour parking is available on site on the Canal Street side.

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Brick Walk In The Park.

Richmond Heritage Trail – Richmond

  • Richmond Heritage Trail
  • Country Acres Road, Richmond, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°30’10.50″N, 71°39’56.31″W
  • Last Time Hiked: September 22, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.9 miles
  • Fairly easy.

 

The Richmond Heritage Trail is one of the newest trail systems in the State opening in September of 2017. It comprises of three very distinctive types of walks. The first part is an ADA accessible stone dust path with a beautiful boardwalk. This section is about a half mile long and offers six informational boards about the history and heritage of Richmond. There is a blue blazed trail that meanders to the far reaches of the property. This trail was developed largely in part by Richmond Boy Scout Troop 1. The trail weaves through a forest of pines, beech, and maple trees. A gravel road is also on the property, that for the most part, parallels the blue trail. The back reaches of the gravel road passes fields of tall grasses and wildflowers that is a haven for butterflies and dragonflies. Adding a little of each of these three different walks, one can hike up to 2 miles. The trail-head is at the base of the towns bright blue water tower at the end of Country Acres Road.

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A Stretch of the Boardwalk.

Oakland Beach – Warwick

 

This beach at the tip of a peninsula overlooks Narragansett Bay. From here you see both the Newport Bridge and Jamestown Bridge. Sailboats and cabin cruisers are also a normal sight from here. The beach, and immediate area, is also usually quite busy. There are a few very popular restaurants just by the park and beach as well. One can get just about a mile of walking by following the beach to the extreme eastern edge of the park by the boat ramp, then back following the walking path pass the gazebo through the park, then following the wooden boardwalk and eventually the bike path to its western terminus at Strand Avenue… and then back.

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Boardwalk and Beach

Riverfront Park – Attleboro

  • Judith H. Robbins Riverfront Park
  • Riverfront Drive, Attleboro, MA
  • Trailhead: 41°56’30.54″N, 71°17’10.90″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 20, 2017
  • Approximate distance hiked: 0.5 miles
  • Easy.

 

Attleboro has just opened a new park along the banks of the Ten Mile River, transforming a bleak industrial strip of land into an appealing spot just outside of downtown. The new park, dedicated to former mayor Judith Robbins, offers a short quarter mile bike path/walking path that is flanked by grass and perennial gardens. There are several picnic tables and sitting benches if you care to linger for a bit for lunch, a break from the day, or waiting for a train as the Attleboro MBTA station is just across the street.

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Riverfront Park

Jones Pond – East Providence

 

Tucked away in a suburban neighborhood is a new walking path in a revitalized park. Jones Pond has a long history for a small park. The pond, originally a freshwater kidney shaped pond, is said to be the location of a Native American village according to an old book by The Narragansett Archaeological Society of Rhode Island. A quarry was also nearby in the early 20th century. During the 1930’s the adjacent Pierce Field Stadium was built and Jones Pond was “squared off” to the shape it is today. During World War II, Quonset huts were built and used on the property. For years after that the pond served as a neighborhood spot to ice skate before falling into disarray. Just recently the pond and surrounding park has been given new life as a half mile of walking paths have been built with perennial gardens along them. There are also some rather interesting, artistic bike racks here. The small shrubs and trees serve as a haven for several species of birds.

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Bike Rack at Jones Pond

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