Archive for December, 2013

Woods Trail – Ledyard/North Stonington

  • Woods Trail
  • Lantern Hill Road, Ledyard, CT
  • Trailhead: 41°28’0.47″N,  71°57’3.96″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 29, 2013
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.3 miles
  • Easy with slight elevation.
 
 

Finding myself in eastern Connecticut this morning with more than enough time to kill I went seeking a relatively easy trail to walk. Actually a hike. Yes folks, the first hike since the injury. It was a short and for the most part level lollipop loop trail on the Foxwoods property. The trail is blazed very well with green markers and the beginning shares the trail with the Lantern Hill hike which I plan on doing in the future. The trailhead is well marked with signage behind the Two Trees Inn at Foxwoods. I came across some wildlife and saw several deer track. The frozen Lantern Hill Pond is near the end of the loop. Besides the lake I came across a cellar hole and a stream which was also partially frozen.

I did not find a trail map on-line.

Old Stone Wall

Old Stone Wall

Warren Bike Path – Warren

 
 

The Warren Bike Path is a little over a mile long stretch of paved path from Long Road to the Kickemuit River. It follows an old railroad bed that abuts small streams and ponds as well as athletic fields. On a personal note, this was the first walk since my injury that I experienced no significant pain. I am tempted to try a real hike soon. I was also joined by some eager geocachers for this walk. They did well finding them. We started the walk from a parking area on Asylum Road first heading east toward Long Road end of the bike path. We then retraced our steps back to and across Asylum Road before heading west to the end of the bike path that has an overlook of the Kickemuit River. Near this point is the Hugh Cole Well. Hugh Coles family was a long time land owner in the area. There is a monument noting this. We then retraced our steps back to the car stopping along the way to look for more geocaches.

More information can be found at: Warren Bike Path

An Icy Kickemuit River

An Icy Kickemuit River

Lincoln Woods – Lincoln

  • Lincoln Woods State Park
  • Twin River Road, Lincoln, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°53’13.93″N,  71°26’14.29″W
  • Last Time Hiked: December 25, 2013
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.8 miles
  • Easy with slight elevation.
 
 

I decided this very cold Christmas morning to take a walk between gift opening and dinner. Still following doctors orders (for the most part) of no hiking I choose Lincoln Woods because of the loop road that goes around Onley Pond. Starting at a parking area near the beach I walked the loop road counter clockwise around the pond. Along the way I came across a small tree someone had decorated for Christmas. After the dam I came to an intersection. I followed the road to the left until I came to a sign for the Sunset Hiking Trails. I did venture off briefly onto a small set of trails that ran along the edge of the pond that would come back out the road again. I then followed the road to the left and back to the car. I will probably return here in the future to explore the off road trails further.

Trail map can be found at: Lincoln Woods

Unsafe For Skating

Unsafe For Skating

Fort Adams – Newport

  • Fort Adams State Park Bay Walk
  • Harrison Avenue, Newport, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°28’40.47″N,  71°20’7.27″W
  • First Time Hiked: December 22, 2013
  • Last Time Hiked: March 16, 2016
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.2 miles
  • Easy.
 

I’ve been to Fort Adams many times and it is a very picturesque location. On a clear day you see the Beavertail and Rose Island lighthouses to name a few. The Newport Bridge, Newport Harbor, Fort Wetherill, and boats of all sorts are also visible from Fort Adams. The walk is marked by “Bay Walk” signs. The walk is about two miles long mostly on paved paths and service roads and follows the perimeter of the state park. Some of the highlights are the defensive fort itself, a monument to the U.S.S. Bennington, and the Eisenhower House. Construction of the massive stone fort started in 1824 and continued for nearly three decades. There were other fortifications on the property prior. Being the day before St. Patrick’s Day, the Irish flag was flying proud above the fort. Ironically, the fort was built mostly by Irish laborers. We (walked with the Appalachian Mountain Club – Narragansett Chapter)  started the walk from the visitors center and followed the loop path counter clockwise.

Additional information can be found at: Fort Adams

FA16

Fort Adams with the Irish Flag flying.

Meshanticut Park – Cranston

 

Little known except to locals and nestled in a Cranston neighborhood, Meshanticut State Park is a quiet and nice short walk on paved paths and narrow roads that wrap around Meshanticut Lake. Many people walk their dogs here and there is an abundance of water fowl and squirrels, both that seem fearless to people and come right up to you. The one loop around the lake is approximately three quarters of a mile.

I did not find a map on-line.

Meshanticut Lake

Meshanticut Lake

West Warwick River Walk – West Warwick

 

Starting at a parking at the West Warwick Youth Center the river walk follows the Pawtuxet River approximately a half mile to the Royal Mills Dam. There use to be a little more to this walk at one time, however, the flood of March 2010 washed away the footbridge that crossed over the river. (click link and forward to 4:21). The walk is easy and fairly level.

I did not find a map on-line.

Royal Mills Dam

Royal Mills Dam

Ten Mile River North – Pawtucket

  • Ten Mile River Greenway – North
  • Daggett Avenue, Pawtucket, RI
  • Trailhead: 41°53’6.22″N,  71°20’41.71″W
  • First Time Hiked: December 8, 2013
  • Last Time Hiked: November 9, 2014
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.0 miles
  • Easy.
 

The Ten Mile River Greenway Bicycle Path is 3 miles in length and it winds along the shores of Central Pond and the Ten Mile River from East Providence into Pawtucket. The northern section of the bike path starts at Daggett Field, then turns and follows the Ten Mile River on one side and the Darlington neighborhood on the other. There is a dam and pond just before Armistice Boulevard. After crossing the busy street the bike path enters Slater Park and follows the river as it passes through man-made canals with walls built during the Great Depression. From Daggett Field to the southern end of Slater Park is just about a mile and a half. From this point and back is just about 3 miles. For more distance continue along the bike path or explore the paths at Slater Park.

Trail map can be found at: Ten Mile River North

Ten Mile River Greenway at Armistice Boulevard

Ten Mile River Greenway at Armistice Boulevard