Posts Tagged ‘ Streams ’

Prudence West – Portsmouth

  • Prudence West
  • Bay Avenue, Portsmouth, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°37’20.93″N, 71°19’21.29″W (1.5 miles from ferry)
  • Last Time Hiked: July 30, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.1 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

This hike on the western side of Prudence Island covers a variety of trails. It starts at a picnic and parking area along Bay Road at the entrance of Pulpit Rock. The rock it self is a couple hundred feet from the trail head along the Blind Allen Trail. This rock is where Roger Williams use to preach to the Native Americans and is also believed to be the throne of Canonicus and Miantonomi of the Narragansett Tribe. Continuing a little further along the winding Blind Allen Trail you will come to a trail intersection. Take a left here onto the newly created Deer Chase Run. This trail, blazed with deer hoof symbols, slowly climbs up a hill that leads to the Desert, an area of the island that wind erosion has made unsuitable for farming. The area now is abundant with pitch pine trees and occasional areas of sand. Soon you will come to the intersection of the Desert Trail. Continue ahead here following the hoof symbols of Deer Chase Run. The trail winds slightly downhill to a bridge crossing at Mill Creek. The trail then winds easterly exiting at utility pole 11 along Sunset Hill Avenue. Turn right here and follow the dirt road for about a tenth of a mile passing the Sunset Hill Farm (Bacon Farm) on the right. Ahead of you will signage for trails. Continue straight and onto the trail. You will see signage for the Diamond Trail on a tree. Continue ahead for a bit and you will come to a trail intersection. This is the Diamond Trail. To the left it would lead you to Baker Farm. For this hike turn right onto the Diamond Trail and follow it, passing tall grasses and shrubs, for about two tenths of a mile to another dirt road. At the dirt road stay to the left and pass through the wall. You are now at a six trail intersection. Turn right here and start to follow the Division Wall Trail keeping the wall to your right for the time being. This trail is blazed with a mathematic division symbol. The wall, which runs almost completely across the island represents the division line between land owned by Roger Williams (to the north) and John Winthrop (to the south). The wall was built a century after the agreement was made in the 1630’s. The trail follows the wall dipping into a valley, crossing a small stream, and then slightly back uphill a bit before ascending to Bay Avenue. The Ballard Trail runs parallel to this trail and joins it before coming to the street. Across the street is the end of the wall and the Division Rock, the dividing point between the two property owners. Also at this location is the beginning of the Sunset Trail on which you will follow along the west shore of the island for a half mile. Along the way on the right you will find a grave of an unknown British sailor who perished in the American Revolution. The Sunset Trail ends at Chase Way, a dirt road. Stay to the left here and follow the road along the shoreline. The road passes Chase Beach before winding to the right. At the end of Chase Way turn left onto Bay Avenue and follow it to the parking area at Pulpit Rock.

 

NOTE: If you plan on hiking on Prudence Island, be known that the island is not commercialized. There are no restaurants, lodging, or transportation services. Once you are off the ferry you are on your own. Bring everything you will need for a day hike with no services.

 

Updated trail map can be purchased at NBNERR at South Prudence.

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Along The Division Wall Trail

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Brown House Glen Farm Trail – Portsmouth

  • Brown House Glen Farm Trail
  • Linden Lane, Portsmouth, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°33’17.53″N, 71°15’3.56″W
  • Last Time Hiked: July 12, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.7 miles
  • Fairly easy, some small hills.

 

At the extreme northerly end of the Sakonnet Greenway on Linden Lane there are two kiosks. One is for the Greenway itself and the other is for the lesser known Brown House Glen Farm Trail. The route follows mostly roads and tree lines and is not overly defined. There are some trail markers, but they are far between. The walk itself covers some quite beautiful and historical property. Starting from the parking area directly across from the northerly terminus of the Greenway, walk east down the paved and aptly named Linden Lane. The narrow paved road is flanked by stone walls under a canopy of linden trees. To the right are the fields of the Newport Polo Grounds. At the intersection, continue straight passing an old house, known as the Red Cross House, on the left. The house was occupied by the farm superintendent and during World War II volunteers rolled bandages here. Continuing straight the road is now dirt, crosses a small brook, and bends to the right before coming to Glen Farm Road. Turn left here and follow the paved road to its end, passing a few residences along the way. Turn right onto Glen Road and almost immediately on the right is the path to the wooden footbridge. After crossing the bridge stay to your right and follow the tree line keeping the recreation areas to your left. Soon you will came to some old farm structures. Stay to the right here then continue to follow the tree line southerly, then easterly, before turning northerly making your way around a hilly field with a sheep shed in the middle. Soon you will come the kiosk at the far end of the trail. From here, turn left and follow the tree line (and power lines) up the hill back to the farm structures. From here continue straight retracing your steps back to the footbridge and Glen Farm Road. On the way back turn right at utility pole 11 and follow the dirt road into the barn area of the farm. This area is still active so use caution while exploring the area. Some of the buildings (not in use) are literally crumbling here and others are used for horses. The stone barns date back to the early 1900’s. The road then turns to the left passing an indoor rink to the left before coming to the Red Cross House once again. Turn right here and follow Linden Lane back to the parking area.

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Glen Farm

Laurel Loop – Voluntown

  • Laurel Loop Trail
  • Fish Road, Voluntown, CT
  • Trailhead:  41°33’3.44″N, 71°49’48.04″W
  • Last Time Hiked: June 23, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 3.8 miles
  • Fairly easy, trails can be muddy.

 

Starting from a parking area along Fish Road about a eight tenths of a mile from Route 49, follow Fish Road easterly for a few feet until you come to where the Nehantic Trail crosses the road. Here you will turn right and follow the blue blazed Nehantic Trail for just a few feet before coming to the Pachaug-Nehantic Crossover Trail. This trail, on the left is blazed blue/red and there is very good signage here. The trail itself is at first very narrow winding through a forest floor of vibrant and tall ferns. You will shortly come to a road crossing where there was once a toll booth. The blue/red blazed trail continues ahead on the other side of the road. It slowly climbs uphill through canopies of mountain laurel and tall trees before descending gently. Look closely on the right for an old cemetery. Beyond the cemetery on the left the trail bends to the left, downhill and over a small stream before coming to some old and rather impressive foundations on the left. Beyond the foundations the trail splits. To the right the crossover trail continues to the right. Turn left here to follow the Laurel Loop. Signage (at the time of this hike) is very well marked. The remainder of the Laurel Loop Trail is now blazed blue/yellow and is now following an old cart path. Soon you will see a house on the left. The trail turns right just before the road and continues through the woods winding through an area of low shrubs including blueberries. The trail soon swings to the west and crosses Tarklin Hill Road. Continuing straight across the road the trail then follows another, slightly overgrown, cartpath flanked with even more mountain laurel. The trail meanders northwesterly for a bit before swinging south and then west. Along the way you will cross a seasonal brook, see a large open field to the right, cross a wooden bridge over another stream, and walk through a pine grove, before coming to another road crossing at Hill Road. The last stretch of trail continues across the road westerly into the woods before turning to the south. The trail then comes to the road intersection near the toll booth. Turn right here and follow Fish Road westerly back to the parking area.

 

Map can be found at: Laurel Loop

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Foundations Along The Laurel Loop

Capwell Mill Pond – West Greenwich

  • Capwell Mill Pond – Big River Management Area
  • Burnt Sawmill Road, West Greenwich, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°38’39.57″N, 71°36’27.08″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 17, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.7 miles
  • Fairly easy with some difficult navigation.

 

This is yet another beautiful hike in the Big River Management Area. The trails here are numerous, unmarked, and can be difficult to navigate. With that being said, it is not advisable to do this hike without a reliable map, an understanding how to read it, a sense of direction, and absolutely be sure to use GPS tracking in the case you need to back track. This hike starts from a small parking area along Burnt Swamp Road before the gate by the Capwell Mill Pond Dam. It is about three tenths of a mile from Nooseneck Hill Road. After passing the gate you will see the dam on the left. Shortly after the dam follow the narrow trail to the left. It climbs slightly uphill into a grass field before winding into the tall pines. Soon a trail comes in from the right. Stay to the left here and you will cross a bridge. The view, overlooking a tributary of the pond is quite pleasant. After the bridge the trail splits, continue straight. The trail slowly climbs uphill through a lush forest of pines. Be aware of your trail intersections for this walk. At the next trail intersection continue straight again following the main trail. You will continue to climb slightly uphill. This section of trail can be quite wet after a heavy rain. You will soon pass a stone wall. Just after the wall is a narrow path to the left. Ignore it for this hike and continue ahead. You will soon pass a second stone wall and then the trail winds a bit before coming to a large boulder at a trail intersection. This is about the one mile mark. Ignore the trail to left and continue straight on the main trail as it starts to bend to the right. Slow down and start looking for the next trail intersection about one tenth of a mile after the large boulder. As the trail starts to turn to the right by a mossy rock with a tree growing on it there is a trail on the left. It is narrow, but defined enough to be noticed. Turn left here and follow the trail as it starts downhill. Soon the trail ends at another well defined trail. There will be a white blaze on the tree at the intersection. Turn left here. In a few yards you will come to another intersection with a tree blazed white. You will want to continue straight, but first follow the trail to the right to the bridge crossing the stream called Mud Bottom Brook. The slight detour is well worth it. Take a moment here. The babbling brook drowns out all other nearby sounds and you are out in the middle of nowhere nearly a mile from any civilization. Return up the hill to the tree with the white blazes and turn right. After making the turn and following the trail you will pass a stone wall on the left. The stone wall then flanks the trail to the right for a bit before the trail starts to descend downhill leaving the stone wall behind. The trail then starts its slight bend to the left passing a boulder in the middle of the trail. The boulder is a good reference point and is just the right height to sit for a moment and take in the nature around you. From here the trail continues downhill and bending to the left. You will start getting your first glimpses of the pond through the trees on the right. Passing another stone wall the trail splits. They rejoin in a few yards where the trail splits yet again. At this split stay to the right. There is also some mountain laurel scattered around in the area. Continuing ahead the pond is still to the right through the trees and there is another stone wall on the left. The trail turns to the left crossing the stone wall and then to the right meandering to and from the pond. A trail soon comes in from the left, stay to the right and continue to the end of the trail. Turn right and you will cross the bridge overlooking the tributary of the pond once again. Just after the bridge turn right onto the trail that will lead you back to the dam and parking area. Blaze orange is required during hunting season.

 

Map can be found at: Capwell Mill Pond (Map 1), (Map 2).

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Pines, Stone Walls, And The Pond.

Ponaganset Covered Bridge Trail – Glocester

  • Ponaganset Covered Bridge Trail
  • Anan Wade Road, Glocester, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°51’59.71″N,71°42’43.31″W
  • Last Time Hiked: April 15, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 2.0 miles
  • Fairly easy with some elevation.

 

The cross country course behind Ponaganset High School in Glocester may be one of the best kept secret trails in the state. Open to the public when not in use for track meets and other school events, this trail offers a nice 2 mile stroll through some beautiful wooded property that is zigzagged with small seasonal streams. The bridges across these streams are the highlights of this walk, one being a covered bridge. For this walk, you start from the north parking lot of the High School by the superintendents office. Stay to the right and make your way to the football field and track. On the right is the trailhead marked with a sign. Follow the stone dust trail and you soon come to the covered bridge. Continuing, the trail follows the perimeter of a ball field before turning slightly to the right and uphill. At the top of the hill the trail turns to the left and slightly downhill to a four way intersection dubbed “Grand Central Station”. For this walk take the second left. You will follow a loop trail the traverses through the southern end of the property eventually returning to the four way intersection. From the intersection continue straight up and over the hill, back down to the covered bridge, returning to the parking lot.

 

Map can be found at: Ponaganset Covered Bridge Trail.

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Covered Bridge at Ponaganset

Town Pond – Portsmouth

 

This out and back trail is well maintained and follows the west shore of Town Pond on one side and Founders Brook beyond the shrubs and thickets on the other side. The trail is accessible from an unmarked parking area on Anthony Road and the trail starts from the left side of the lot. The shrubbery along the trail serves as a haven for birds of all sorts. There are also utility poles here with nests for ospreys here. Hawks, owls, a great blue heron, ducks, and swans were all observed here at the time of this walk. The trail ends at the railroad tracks and across the way is the Bertha Russel Preserve which is essentially a tidal marsh protected for wildlife. This area is also significantly historical as this is approximately where Anne Hutchinson founded the colony which became Rhode Island in 1638. Founders Brook Park is nearby and has monuments commemorating the event.

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From the end of the trail looking over the Russel Preserve

Caroline E. Judson – Smithfield

  • Caroline E. Judson Trust Property
  • Williams Road, Smithfield, RI
  • Trailhead:  41°54’34.26″N, 71°33’24.73″W
  • Last Time Hiked: January 15, 2018
  • Approximate distance hiked: 1.5 miles
  • Fairly easy with some significant elevation.

 

At the end of Williams Road is a small parking area for a couple of cars. The trail head is just to the right of the Land Trust sign. The trail winds downhill flanked by stone walls and old barbed wire fencing. Along this strip of wooded land on each side are large fields. At the end of the trail you can catch a glimpse of Stillwater Reservoir through the woods. The trail to the right leads into one of the large fields before dead ending near the property line with Hebert Health Center. The field is a good spot to watch birds circling above. The trail to the left leads further into the woods slowly winding down to a wooden bridge that crosses a beautiful cascading stream. The stream at the time of this hike was particularly high in velocity due to a recent snow melt. The trail then continues, following above the stream, into the Connors Farm Conservation Area at the blue blazed trail. A loop through Connors Farm, itself a beautiful hike, would add distance to the hike. From here retrace your steps back to the parking area at the end of Williams Road. A deer was spotted here at the property as well as chipmunks and a pair of red tailed hawks.

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Cascading Stream From the Footbridge.

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